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Thread: Calling all frame quilters...

  1. #1
    Senior Member vicki75's Avatar
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    Ok, I went to the Phoenix Quilt Show and the LQS had a booth with New Joy quilt frames that work with 5 or 6 different regular sewing machines i.e., Juki TL 98Q, Brother 1500, Babylock QCP, etc. The representative told me that some quilters will start a quilt, quilt it half way, then flip the quilt and start quilting from the other end. This avoids running out of quilting space at the end of the quilt since you are limited to a 9 inch throat. She couldn't explain it clearly because she had never done it herself.

    My question is...How in the world does that work? How do you keep the quilt from bunching up in the middle? How do you turn it around when it's half quilted? I can't wrap my brain around it. I hope someone out there has done this and can tell me if it works?


    Can anyone

  2. #2
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    Ugg! A local quilter did this with one of my quilts. She didn't turn it but started in the middle and did one side and then the other. It left sorta a fold line, not a quilting line but the flow of the quilting line seemed to start over. I did not like it at all but it was a utility quilt so I wasn't that upset. I haven't let her do any more of my quilts. I told her why and she said that was the way all the quilts looked when machine quilted, the way she was taught to do by her LA rep. Statler taught her this? I don't think so.

  3. #3
    Senior Member vicki75's Avatar
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    Well...I was afraid something like that could happen. I just don't understand how you could get a nice flow to the quilt. I wish I could figure it out...My dad is a genius and this is driving him crazy. He knows how bad I want a long arm and he's trying to help me figure out if this alternative would work or if it would be a waste of money. I would hate to spend $2000 just to realize I should've waited til I could afford the real deal. I'm just not patient! LOL

  4. #4
    Super Member rexie's Avatar
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    What if you rolled it up and started quilting from the inside out?

  5. #5
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    That is not something I would want to do.

    Knowing this is good enough reason NOT to invest in a 9" arm quilting machine. This is one reason people do research on what is available before they spend their money. Took my 8 months to figure that out, after hearing quilters say what frustration they had when they got to the bottom (end) of the quilt.

    I cannot imagine taking the frame apart so you could move the poles with the quilt attached to the leader cloth. It would be a 2 person job - and who wants to waste their time taking the frame apart with every quilt? No me!!!!

  6. #6
    Senior Member Shelley's Avatar
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    That sounds (to me) to be a horrible idea! I avoid turning quilts (putting the sides on the rollers after quilting the body) to do that borders - I do it when necessary, but I really look for ways to avoid it. I can't imagine trying to do that on every quilt.

    Can you load your quilt with the length on the rollers so that you have less bulk on the take up roller?

  7. #7
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    i have a new joy with janome 1600DP i only get 5 inches by the time the quilt is less than half way done. i want a long arm. there is a long arm show in may (13 14th) in overland park mo. and going to take two day and see which one i will buy i will try as many as they will allow. i would never turn a quilt i did have one my little nice started on the machine and i had to put it on the frame half stated it's impossible.

  8. #8
    Super Member Boston1954's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BellaBoo
    Ugg! A local quilter did this with one of my quilts. She didn't turn it but started in the middle and did one side and then the other. It left sorta a fold line, not a quilting line but the flow of the quilting line seemed to start over. I did not like it at all but it was a utility quilt so I wasn't that upset. I haven't let her do any more of my quilts. I told her why and she said that was the way all the quilts looked when machine quilted, the way she was taught to do by her LA rep. Statler taught her this? I don't think so.
    This is the kind of thing that keeps me from going to a professional. The other is that I cannot afford it anyhow.....

  9. #9
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    There are many home quilting systems that have been designed for those who cannot afford the expensive long arm machines. Not everyone can be a professional, but many can quilt their own quilts in the comfort of their own homes.

    Since the 9" arm quilters were the first on the market, you may be surprised that various companies have moved from 13" to 15" to 17" arm machines. There are also 18" and 20" available. Used with the proper frame these can give a quilter very satisfying results.

    I have used a Bailey 13" Home Quilter for 2 years. I have no regrets over the size I purchased. My quilts are made for charities and I seldom do King size quilts anymore, but I have been able to handle them easily with this size machine.

    So don't give up on looking for a home quilting system. They do not need to break the bank. Do lots of research. I spent 8 months asking questions before I made my choice. This is not a purchase decision to be made quickly and regretted later. Good equipment for the home quilter is being made all the time. It can only get better.

    If I can do this at age 75, so can anyone else. I made 40 quilts this past year and everyone was given to my favorite charity.

  10. #10
    Senior Member OdessaQuilts's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boston1954
    This is the kind of thing that keeps me from going to a professional. The other is that I cannot afford it anyhow.....
    I have a friend who only charges a penny an inch; VERY reasonable for machine quilting, I think, and she does a lovely job. I wish I could get more business to her so she can make a profit. If not, the IRS will consider her business a "hobby" (a pretty expen$ive one, when you consider how pricey those longarm machines can get), and I don't want that to happen to her. It would just devastate her.

    And I don't think you should be concerned about hiring a pro ... if you check out their work, you should be comfortable with the skill/quality you see, and be happy with the price, too.

    HTH,

    Odessa

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