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Thread: does putting thread in the freezer work?

  1. #1
    Senior Member BeckyB's Avatar
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    does putting thread in the freezer work?

    I am having trouble with my thread free motion quilting and was wondering if putting it in the freezer will help?
    Thank you
    Becky
    It is easier to be wise for others than for ourselves.

  2. #2
    Super Member virtualbernie's Avatar
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    Never heard of this one, gonna watch to see what others say.
    Bernie

  3. #3
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    Actually, as bizarre as it sounds, I have a friend with 2 longarms who has done this and reports success. I would call her an expert, she quilts as many as 30 quilts a month, and she was having problems with one particular thread. She called the manufacturer who instructed her to put it in the freezer overnight. She rolled her eyes but figured she had nothing to lose, so she did, and it worked! She said it sewed like a dream the next day. I do not know which thread it was or why it worked.

  4. #4
    Senior Member BeckyB's Avatar
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    Thank you sew much for this info...I am so frustrated that I will put it in the freezer and quit for tonight:{
    Becky
    It is easier to be wise for others than for ourselves.

  5. #5
    Super Member virtualbernie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BeckyB View Post
    Thank you sew much for this info...I am so frustrated that I will put it in the freezer and quit for tonight:{
    Becky
    Let me know how it works--looks like I'll be putting my thread in the freezer too.
    Bernie

  6. #6
    Super Member Nanamoms's Avatar
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    I've read on my embroidery groups that putting thread in the freezer will restore moisture and keep it from drying and breaking. Haven't tried it myself yet.

  7. #7
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
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    Sorry, but if you have to do this with your thread to make it sew properly it is either too old to use or junk!!! If you use quality thread, you won't waste you time.

  8. #8
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
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    And just how can a frost-free freezer add moisture?? Their function is to remove moisture from the air inside the freezer. Sounds like an old trick that never changed with the upgrades in technology.
    The Earth without art is just "Eh".

  9. #9
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    Here is a little different take on this idea. Wet your spool of thread and let it drain off on the counter, then put it into the fridge in the salad crisper. Seems to work!

  10. #10
    Super Member MacThayer's Avatar
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    This may be way off topic, but I used to put my nylons and panty hose in a container of water and freeze the overnight, and I'll swear they lasted longer and didn't snag as easily. This suggestion came from the manufacturer, and was meant for brand new hose. I think if we enlisted a chemist, he/she could tell us what the freezing process does to the fibers in the materials that are frozen.

    I hear you when you note that the technology has changed, and "frost free" freezers remove moisture instead of adding it. But we haven't determined yet if it's the addition of moisture or the act of freezing that is providing the beneficial help for the thread, and it sounds like it's the freezing alone. If you're concerned about adding a bit of moisture, you could always do as I did, and freeze it in a container of water, or not as drastic, just a sealed plastic bag with moisture in it.
    That would solve the problem.

    This is not the first time I've heard it suggested that I put some kind of material into the freezer - dry or wet - for at least 24 hours to obtain a beneficial result. I'm thinking there has to be something to it. If it works, then I say "go for it!"
    Why argue with success?

    Cheers!
    MacThayer

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