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Thread: does putting thread in the freezer work?

  1. #26
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BeckyB View Post
    Well Ladies......I am sewing great with the thread that I put in the freezer! I can not explain it but it seems to be working!
    Thank you for all your input...it was much appreciated
    Becky
    Glad to hear it! So, is your freezer a frost-free model?

  2. #27
    Senior Member BeckyB's Avatar
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    frost free...but after the comments about moisture I put a tiny bit of water on the cardboard spool.
    It is easier to be wise for others than for ourselves.

  3. #28
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    Thread in the refrigerator

    A quilt teacher once told me to store cotton threads I'd had for some years into the refrigerator for a few days. Something about the thread being "dry" and the moisture in the refrigerator puts the moisture back again. I have had reels of threads for many many years and I do put the container of threads in the refrigerator from time to time. I've never had a problem with them, I also throw the polyester threads in the refrigerator too for a little holiday.
    By the way, I put silk garments in the freezer to freeze before I iron them, and years ago when I used to damp down the washing prior to ironing, if I couldn't get the ironing done that day I would store the whole damped down lot in the chest freezer. It didn't dry out and I didn't have to re-damp it all down again.
    Does anyone still damp down their ironing?

    Regards,
    Anna from Oz

  4. #29
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    I recently attended a Sharon Schamber workshop and she recommends dunking the whole spool of thread in mineral oil from the drugstore. You then wipe of the outside. It actually oils your machine and the thread also becomes lubricated. I've actually tried it and it really works. She says she never has trouble with her machines any more.

  5. #30
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    I've been hearing about this for years and many of my friends have done it successfully.

    Once I discovered Mettler embroidery cotton 60wt for handpiecing, Aurifil cotton 50wt for machine piecing, and Bottom Line poly 60wt for the bobbin I donated most my other threads. I keep finding more which I'll get rid of some day.
    Last edited by gollytwo; 04-06-2012 at 05:36 AM. Reason: spelling

  6. #31
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    I would be VERY careful about using mineral oil with some machines. I have a HV Diamond and would never do that.
    Quote Originally Posted by yweiss View Post
    I recently attended a Sharon Schamber workshop and she recommends dunking the whole spool of thread in mineral oil from the drugstore. You then wipe of the outside. It actually oils your machine and the thread also becomes lubricated. I've actually tried it and it really works. She says she never has trouble with her machines any more.

  7. #32
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    Am a longarmer too and when I have a spool of thread that keeps shredding for no reason-after I have done a complete check/maintenance of machine....I will spritz the spool with some water.....just enough to dampen it and it will stop misbehaving. And, yes, putting in fridge overnight has been done, but sometimes just a small spritz and a ziplock bag while you have a cuppa will tame that thread.........

  8. #33
    Super Member sniktasemaj's Avatar
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    When I was a child, we hung our clothes on a line to dry. In winter, when they froze, they were much softer. Perhaps its the same, that freezing softens the fibers.

  9. #34
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    this is interesting as never heard this before

  10. #35
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    I had never heard of this before, but love the lively discussion!
    Penny aka PLS 1946

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by yweiss View Post
    I recently attended a Sharon Schamber workshop and she recommends dunking the whole spool of thread in mineral oil from the drugstore. You then wipe of the outside. It actually oils your machine and the thread also becomes lubricated. I've actually tried it and it really works. She says she never has trouble with her machines any more.
    Now, that sounds really messy and scarey!

  12. #37
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    According to Bob Purcell of Superior Threads, this is an old wives tale. The freezer actually takes moisture from the thread causing it to dry out and making it more brittle. Quality thread does not break....of course, the needle, tension, etc., play a large part......And while all machines are different, they will all use the same threads as long as the proper needle, tension, etc. is employed......I'm not an expert, but I do believe Bob knows his stuff. You can go to www.superiorthread.com for more information. I have no affiliation....just a fan....

  13. #38
    Super Member quiltingshorttimer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wendiq View Post
    According to Bob Purcell of Superior Threads, this is an old wives tale. The freezer actually takes moisture from the thread causing it to dry out and making it more brittle. Quality thread does not break....of course, the needle, tension, etc., play a large part......And while all machines are different, they will all use the same threads as long as the proper needle, tension, etc. is employed......I'm not an expert, but I do believe Bob knows his stuff. You can go to www.superiorthread.com for more information. I have no affiliation....just a fan....
    What I was told was you put the thread into a baggie into freezer and then let thaw--the thawing will cause it to draw moisture into the thread, which will make it more supple. Never tried it though!

  14. #39
    Super Member BarbaraSue's Avatar
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    Not only does freezing remove moisture, but colder things are constricted more so than warm. Maybe that is the benefit to look for. I don't think it can hurt the thread, so give it a try.
    To make lots of quilts, is to have lots of scraps, and I do, and I do.
    BarbaraSue

  15. #40
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    I guess you could test the freezer method by winding two bobbins of the same school of thread, put one in the freezer and then see which one sew better.
    I remember mother freezing the dampened clothes prior to ironing and the clothes ironed much better. I know from experience with church linens that 100% linen must not be dried in the dryer, instead, put the damp linens in the freezer in a zip bag and iron them with a dry iron. NO starch. Your linen will be crisp and beautiful. Works well for cotton too. Remember that bugs tend to like starch.

  16. #41
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    It does work to put thread in the freezer. Thread is not necessarily junk or too old when it won't behave. Why do we use Thread Heaven or bees'wax to "condition" thread? Sometimes it just needs a little help.

  17. #42
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    Whoa, good point! We did this as well growing up, actually just put in a clothes line and thank you for the reminder!!
    BTW they smell sooooo good. (Nice memories Momma)
    Beautiful Columbia River Gorge

  18. #43
    Super Member Olivia's Grammy's Avatar
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    I've put thread in the freezer before with good results. I have a frost free freezer.
    We would worry less about what others think of us if we realized how seldom they do.

  19. #44
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
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    I guess I'm doing something wrong. I've never had trouble with thread.
    The Earth without art is just "Eh".

  20. #45
    Super Member debbieoh's Avatar
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    it worked for me with embroidery machine thread. Had trouble with the thread sherding , after being in the freezer it sewed great

  21. #46
    Senior Member sandypants's Avatar
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    I will have to try this. Just hope hubby doesn't think they are some kind of a popsicle. ):

  22. #47
    Senior Member diamondee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anna from Oz View Post
    A quilt teacher once told me to store cotton threads I'd had for some years into the refrigerator for a few days. Something about the thread being "dry" and the moisture in the refrigerator puts the moisture back again. I have had reels of threads for many many years and I do put the container of threads in the refrigerator from time to time. I've never had a problem with them, I also throw the polyester threads in the refrigerator too for a little holiday.
    By the way, I put silk garments in the freezer to freeze before I iron them, and years ago when I used to damp down the washing prior to ironing, if I couldn't get the ironing done that day I would store the whole damped down lot in the chest freezer. It didn't dry out and I didn't have to re-damp it all down again.
    Does anyone still damp down their ironing?

    Regards,
    Anna from Oz
    Funny, I am only able to iron for QUILTING. but if the clothes come out wrinkled, in the dryer they go with a damp towel. smooth out and fold while still warm.

  23. #48
    Super Member katesnanna's Avatar
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    Not necessarily so Candace. I had a brand new R&A black that shredded like you wouldn't believe. I used the freezer trick and no more trouble.

  24. #49
    Super Member katesnanna's Avatar
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    Good one ghostrider. Sometimes you just have a win. Thanks for the laugh.

  25. #50
    Super Member barri1's Avatar
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    If you are adding moisture to the thread, are you adding moisture, and causing rust in the machine? Isn't there a thead lubricant?

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