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Thread: does putting thread in the freezer work?

  1. #51
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by katesnanna View Post
    Not necessarily so Candace. I had a brand new R&A black that shredded like you wouldn't believe. I used the freezer trick and no more trouble.
    You should have returned it! I've never had thread that needs any special care because I buy good thread. Life is too short to play games with my freezer. Proper threading, tension and needles will do wonders.

  2. #52
    Super Member justflyingin's Avatar
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    I would be interested to know if many people have success with this!

  3. #53
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    I keep my silk applique and embroidery threads in baggies, the snack size, to retain the moisture.

  4. #54
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    If dryness afflicts thread and fabrics - how well do textiles survive in hot, dry areas?

    As compared to damp, cool ones? (I'm thinking musty, moldy and/or mildewy would be more of a problem here)

    If I lived in a hot desert, would I need to go around spritzing everything that was made of a natural fiber?

    I really do want an answer - - - -

  5. #55
    Senior Member BeckyB's Avatar
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    how well do textiles survive in hot, dry areas?

    Quote Originally Posted by bearisgray View Post
    If dryness afflicts thread and fabrics - how well do textiles survive in hot, dry areas?

    As compared to damp, cool ones? (I'm thinking musty, moldy and/or mildewy would be more of a problem here)

    If I lived in a hot desert, would I need to go around spritzing everything that was made of a natural fiber?

    I really do want an answer - - - -
    I looked on the internet and found out nothing......?????
    It is easier to be wise for others than for ourselves.

  6. #56
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    My only question here would be --- if it's the moisture that makes sewing with ( what could be nothing more than old thread ) easier --- then what happens when the quilt is done and the moisture goes away? You still have old thread in your quilt and have defeated the purpose, I would think.

  7. #57
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Granpaquilts View Post
    My only question here would be --- if it's the moisture that makes sewing with ( what could be nothing more than old thread ) easier --- then what happens when the quilt is done and the moisture goes away? You still have old thread in your quilt and have defeated the purpose, I would think.
    I don't think we were specifically speaking about OLD thread, just thread that was not behaving well as it was going through the machine, i.e. breakage. The friend I had mentioned earlier had purchased the thread directly from the manufacturer only a few weeks before using it to quilt.

    No one seems to know exactly why this works, the moisture theory was just that - a theory.

  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nanamoms View Post
    I've read on my embroidery groups that putting thread in the freezer will restore moisture and keep it from drying and breaking. Haven't tried it myself yet.
    I tried this with my thread that I was having trouble with for embroidery. At first I thought it was working great then it started breaking again. I went last weekend and bought larger needles, sharps and now my freestanding lace designs are going great. I'm using polyester thread and I left it in the freezer for a few months. I didn't want to use my expensive thread on the lace when it would be wasted so now it's working great. I heard one person who teaches FMQ say to put you cone of thread on the table if you are having thread breaking problems; sometimes it comes off the spool differently and that seems to make a difference.

    I thought at first mine was dry thread as well after reading all the post last fall but I still had the same problems when I bought new thread. Changing the needle size, type and I also slowed it down (which I had already tried) gave me perfect pieces. Finally.
    Last edited by romanojg; 04-16-2012 at 12:17 PM.
    Judy

  9. #59
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    I keep my betteries in the freezer and used to put my mylons there, but freezing thread is new to me. QB comes through again.
    http://www.oregonquilting.net
    I choose to give my life away for things that last forever

  10. #60
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    Frabric and the freezer

    Quote Originally Posted by MacThayer View Post
    This may be way off topic, but I used to put my nylons and panty hose in a container of water and freeze the overnight, and I'll swear they lasted longer and didn't snag as easily. This suggestion came from the manufacturer, and was meant for brand new hose. I think if we enlisted a chemist, he/she could tell us what the freezing process does to the fibers in the materials that are frozen.

    I hear you when you note that the technology has changed, and "frost free" freezers remove moisture instead of adding it. But we haven't determined yet if it's the addition of moisture or the act of freezing that is providing the beneficial help for the thread, and it sounds like it's the freezing alone. If you're concerned about adding a bit of moisture, you could always do as I did, and freeze it in a container of water, or not as drastic, just a sealed plastic bag with moisture in it.
    That would solve the problem.

    This is not the first time I've heard it suggested that I put some kind of material into the freezer - dry or wet - for at least 24 hours to obtain a beneficial result. I'm thinking there has to be something to it. If it works, then I say "go for it!"
    Why argue with success?

    Cheers!
    When we used to dampen our clothes to iron them and couldn't get to them in a timely fashion we always put them in the freezer so they would not "sour". They ironed so much easier.

    Nancy

  11. #61
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    Here's a new twist: There's a similar discussion on another board I belong to, and the suggestion there is to dip your cone of thread in pharmaceutical-grade mineral oil. Apparently Sharon Schamber does this, it's one of the things she teaches it in her classes. She dips, wipes the excess off, and sews away! I have a friend who is a Homesteader dealer and she does this with her thread. I asked her if the oil leaves stains on her fabric and she said no. I'm going to try this on a cone of Superior Rainbow I've been struggling with.

  12. #62
    Super Member Ruby the Quilter's Avatar
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    I agree with Candace. If you have to do this something is wrong.
    Quilting in the Desert

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