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Thread: does putting thread in the freezer work?

  1. #1
    Senior Member BeckyB's Avatar
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    does putting thread in the freezer work?

    I am having trouble with my thread free motion quilting and was wondering if putting it in the freezer will help?
    Thank you
    Becky
    It is easier to be wise for others than for ourselves.

  2. #2
    Super Member virtualbernie's Avatar
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    Never heard of this one, gonna watch to see what others say.
    Bernie

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    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    Actually, as bizarre as it sounds, I have a friend with 2 longarms who has done this and reports success. I would call her an expert, she quilts as many as 30 quilts a month, and she was having problems with one particular thread. She called the manufacturer who instructed her to put it in the freezer overnight. She rolled her eyes but figured she had nothing to lose, so she did, and it worked! She said it sewed like a dream the next day. I do not know which thread it was or why it worked.

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    Senior Member BeckyB's Avatar
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    Thank you sew much for this info...I am so frustrated that I will put it in the freezer and quit for tonight:{
    Becky
    It is easier to be wise for others than for ourselves.

  5. #5
    Super Member virtualbernie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BeckyB View Post
    Thank you sew much for this info...I am so frustrated that I will put it in the freezer and quit for tonight:{
    Becky
    Let me know how it works--looks like I'll be putting my thread in the freezer too.
    Bernie

  6. #6
    Super Member Nanamoms's Avatar
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    I've read on my embroidery groups that putting thread in the freezer will restore moisture and keep it from drying and breaking. Haven't tried it myself yet.

  7. #7
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
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    Sorry, but if you have to do this with your thread to make it sew properly it is either too old to use or junk!!! If you use quality thread, you won't waste you time.

  8. #8
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
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    And just how can a frost-free freezer add moisture?? Their function is to remove moisture from the air inside the freezer. Sounds like an old trick that never changed with the upgrades in technology.
    The Earth without art is just "Eh".

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    Here is a little different take on this idea. Wet your spool of thread and let it drain off on the counter, then put it into the fridge in the salad crisper. Seems to work!

  10. #10
    Super Member MacThayer's Avatar
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    This may be way off topic, but I used to put my nylons and panty hose in a container of water and freeze the overnight, and I'll swear they lasted longer and didn't snag as easily. This suggestion came from the manufacturer, and was meant for brand new hose. I think if we enlisted a chemist, he/she could tell us what the freezing process does to the fibers in the materials that are frozen.

    I hear you when you note that the technology has changed, and "frost free" freezers remove moisture instead of adding it. But we haven't determined yet if it's the addition of moisture or the act of freezing that is providing the beneficial help for the thread, and it sounds like it's the freezing alone. If you're concerned about adding a bit of moisture, you could always do as I did, and freeze it in a container of water, or not as drastic, just a sealed plastic bag with moisture in it.
    That would solve the problem.

    This is not the first time I've heard it suggested that I put some kind of material into the freezer - dry or wet - for at least 24 hours to obtain a beneficial result. I'm thinking there has to be something to it. If it works, then I say "go for it!"
    Why argue with success?

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    MacThayer

  11. #11
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghostrider View Post
    And just how can a frost-free freezer add moisture?? Their function is to remove moisture from the air inside the freezer. Sounds like an old trick that never changed with the upgrades in technology.
    I have 2 freezers, one is frost-free and one isn't. Maybe it depends on what kind of freezer you have. I've emailed my friend for more details about her experience. I did a google search on the topic and all I found was ONE website that said to prolong the life of your rayon thread, put it in the freezer. However, there's no explanation as to why, and I doubt any of us quilters are using rayon thread for piecing and quilting.
    Last edited by Peckish; 04-04-2012 at 10:55 PM.

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    very interesting

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    Senior Member echoemb's Avatar
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    I had a commercial embroidery business for a long time and at times putting the thread in the freezer was one of the "tricks" we used if we were having problems with thread. I always used the same brand of thread but at times we would have problems and this seemed to work. I don't know why but it did.

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    Senior Member BeckyB's Avatar
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    After I get off work I will try the thread that has been in the freezer over night and let you know if it worked!
    Becky
    It is easier to be wise for others than for ourselves.

  15. #15
    Super Member Tink's Mom's Avatar
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    It sounds like a pretty good trick. Will try it with a varigated thread that has given me trouble before.
    Tink's Mom (My name is really Susie)

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    Putting on my science hat here....

    A lot of issues we have with threads is to do with the heat build up from the friction of sewing. the more layers the more friction the more heat and therefore the more damage to the fibres leading to fraying, shreadding and breakage.

    Soooooo if you put the thread in the freezer it goes through the machine cold and therefore more heat has to be generated to get the thread to a point where it shreads/ melts or frays.... It gives you more time to get the thread to work.

    It would be interesting if a spool placed in the freezer worked just out of the freezer but if left in the warm overnight misbehaved first thing the next day then actually behaved after another spell in the freezer....

    interesting.

    Please keep us up updated.
    Becks

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    I know these things sound odd but they work. When I was trying to get info off my old hard drive my son told me to put it in the freezer and of course I though he was joking. He was not. Many things can be done like this and I do not know why or how they work but they do.
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    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    When I was in high school, my neighbor at the time had a monogramming business before home monogramming machines became available. Her machines were industrial size. She ordered all her thread from Italy and kept it in the freezer. She had a small chest freezer just for her thread. I don't know if it was frost free (probably not) and the thread was put in the freezer in the boxes it came in. I never asked why, I wasn't interested in sewing at the time.
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  19. #19
    QKO
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    It probably doesn't have as much to do with removing or adding moisture as it does with the fact that most things contract when cooled. The fibers might just contract enough to run more smoothly through the machine.

    We do this all the time when changing wheel bearings on our motorcycles -- freeze the new bearings overnight first and they go into the races with fewer issues.

    However, I'm not sure how long the benefit would last with thread -- it would seem that it would warm quickly and you'd lose any contraction you had from it being in the freezer.

    So, I'm with the poster that said "Use a quality thread and you won't have as many issues." :-)

  20. #20
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cheezythequiltmaker View Post
    Soooooo if you put the thread in the freezer it goes through the machine cold and therefore more heat has to be generated to get the thread to a point where it shreads/ melts or frays.... It gives you more time to get the thread to work. Becks
    This sounds interesting, but the website I found that discussed putting the rayon thread in the freezer said to let it come to room temperature before using. So, I'm back at square one for understanding why this would work.

  21. #21
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    use this method to Rehydrate older cotton or silk threads!

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    Super Member SueSew's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghostrider View Post
    And just how can a frost-free freezer add moisture?? Their function is to remove moisture from the air inside the freezer. Sounds like an old trick that never changed with the upgrades in technology.
    My thought exactly. If you put it in without a plastic container it will just suck OUT all the moisture.

    Like cats suck out babies' breath ...but maybe if you suck out the moisture it will shrink a little and work better. Another old wives tale?

    LOL Seriously I'm glad it works, damp or dry. I live in a humid summer climate and hopelessly dry in winter - can't get anything to stay ironed in one season and everything dry and static-y in the other.

    Maybe you can revive it like a cookie - stick an apple slice in the container?
    SueSew
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  23. #23
    BMP
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    I have heard of it but that would really confirm to my husband I had lost it. He would never let me live it down if he saw I was stoing thread in the freezer ...

  24. #24
    Senior Member BeckyB's Avatar
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    Well Ladies......I am sewing great with the thread that I put in the freezer! I can not explain it but it seems to be working!
    Thank you for all your input...it was much appreciated
    Becky
    It is easier to be wise for others than for ourselves.

  25. #25
    Senior Member BeckyB's Avatar
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    Oh and p.s. it was older 100 percent cotton mercerized
    It is easier to be wise for others than for ourselves.

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