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Thread: Free Motion Quilting Let's Chit Chat!

  1. #101
    wishiwerequilting's Avatar
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    I guess if it is not coming easily to go FMQ, then you should see if you have done everything on the FM check list:
    1. properly sandwiched practice piece
    2. machine set up with proper needle, proper thread and foot, with feed dogs dropped. Good lighting.
    3. machine bed level with table or surface you are working on to prevent "drag" on quilt.
    4. gloves or rubber fingers
    5. super slider (or similar cover) for machine bed to decrease friction
    6. after all that...i ithink it is practice, practice, practice.

    Personally I find it most helpful to mark my design with a very visible line (Such as blue water soluble marker or chalk) to follow. Once you get that down, then you can design without any markings, particularly with background fillers. This is a personal thing...each person is different.
    I recommend if you are having problems to make sure all your obstacles are out of the way.

    It can help to practice tracing designs on paper or using a dry erase board until the "pattern" you are doing enters the "memory" of your hands. it does happen. That's why it is easiest to start with things that are familiar to your hands, such as your name, stars, etc.
    To stipple, take paper and try to make the stippling shape (like a puzzle piece) with a pencil or pen without lifting it off the paper. Once you can do that, you can do it on fabric.

  2. #102
    Member Marlene1's Avatar
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    Hi,

    I bought the Bernina 820 almost one year ago and have had all kinds of trouble with the BSR skipping stitches. Took it back and had a heavier duty spring placed in the BSR. This issue is also addressed on their website and there is a site your repair person can go to about this issue and how to adjust your machine.

    This BSR on the 820 does not like when you use 505 for example to fuse your sandwich together. It doesn't like Heat n Bond lite when you fuse an applique and want to stitch inside the applique. I am now trying to find a product called Fuse and Fix to see if this will correct the problem.

    I have taken several classes on free motion quilting and really enjoy it if the machine/BSR works properly. Don't seem to have a problem if I thread baste my quilt instead of spray baste.

    Free motion quilting just takes lots and lots of practice. Don't give up-keep practicing.
    Marlene
    marlenegren@gmail.com
    PS: Use BSR 1 with the foot control, use 1/2 speed, single stitch plate. Hope this info. is helpful.

  3. #103
    Super Member purplefiend's Avatar
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    I've been doing free motion quilting since 1992.
    Sharon W. in Texas

  4. #104
    Super Member purplefiend's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tortoisethreads
    I am still learning. I tend to stress out while I'm machine quilting. The first 2 quilts I did on the machine kept puckering and folding on the back. Ugh, it made me nuts. Now, I stop every few stitches and feel the back to make sure. I like the control of hand quilting, but I like the stippling effect of machine quilting.
    You have to make sure when you're basting your quilt that you get the backing taut so you don't get puckers when you're quilting. I use the size #1 curved quilter's safety pins.
    Sharon W. in Texas

  5. #105
    Super Member purplefiend's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by taiboo
    I'm looking for a beginner pattern for FMQ...can anyone suggest one? Easier the better as this is my first time doing it LOL
    Kimberlie,
    A big meander type of quilting is good for a beginner.

  6. #106
    wishiwerequilting's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by quilter53
    When using a darker thread either for the back or the front sometimes the other thread shows. Do I need to adjust the tension? I have a Viking D1.
    possibly. I use very fine threads for machine quilting...such as Mettler 60/2 ply embroidery cotton thread, Masterpiece thread or Bottom Line thread. That way if the thread does show a bit, it is not very noticable b/c it is fine thread. Never use poor quality thread for machine quilting!
    This was a trick I learned from Deb Wagner...that she liked the quilting to complement the piecing and not stand out on its own. There are others who would disagree with that and would like to have the quilting stand out and they use variegated thread and really make it pop. But if you are starting out and not so confident in your ability, i like the blending in concept. ;)

    Try to select a thread which blends with the majority of your fabrics in your blocks. It may be a grayish or taupe color.
    When you select backing fabric, try to select a busy backing (until you are confident and want to show off!) that won't show your stitching that much and then try to have a color which blends with the majority of the top.
    (so in other words, if you have a rather dark top, don't use a light backing) That way, if you have some show through of the bobbin, you won't see it as much. Bobbin thread should match the backing as best as possible.
    When selecting thread, try to have your top with you and your backing with you and pull one strand out to lay it on the fabric, as the spool laying on the fabric will look very different than one thread.
    when all else fails, you can use clear thread. However, it is not always fun to work with and i don't recommend it for beginners.
    JMHO, as always....i'm sure there are others who approach it differently and you will get lots of suggestions from them on this digest...

    One other thing...which i feel is very important...make sure your machine bed is level with the table. So if you have a sewing cabinet, use it. If not, please rig something up so that your quilt is not bumping up to get on the bed of the machine. This puts a lot of "drag" on the quilt and it makes it much more difficult. :thumbdown: You really want to have your quilt top supported as you are quilting. (that means no 4 legged helpers sitting on them either!)

    So put on some relaxing music, and give it a whirl. I hope this helps!
    Good luck!

  7. #107
    Junior Member windycitygal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by craftybear
    I just found this link for free pattern ideas for free motion quilting

    http://www.meliscellaneous.com/misc/...ng_Designs.pdf
    Karen: Thanks for the link! I just started with free motion quilting around Christmas-it is really lots of fun.

  8. #108
    Super Member purplefiend's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rosalyne
    Hi i'm roz. I use a single hole plate. Set machine for medium speed and move hands a liitle slower. This is what I read and tried and it works really well. Have fun!
    I also use the single hole needle plate and a spring darning
    foot and that helps a lot. I quilt with a Viking Sapphire 875,
    I have also used older Berninas and even a treadle machine.
    Sharon W.

  9. #109
    Super Member kwiltkrazy's Avatar
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    Music really helps. Then just start quilting, before you know it you'll relax. It also helps to use quilter's gloves. But, the more you do it the more relaxed you will become. Remember when basting with pins to pin close enough together, 3". I always do my straight lines first, this stabelizes the quilt, then do your fmq.

  10. #110

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    I went to a shop today that has the Handiquilter longarm. The lady let me try it for my first time. She stood close. I had been doing free motion on my home machine. It was a fabulous experience, but alas, I will be using my own machine to do the free-hand stipling.

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