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Thread: Starching or Sizing??? any suggestions??

  1. #11
    Super Member magpie's Avatar
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    sorry i was curious

  2. #12
    Super Member magpie's Avatar
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    Eaglebeak, you could also use a press cloth or parchment paper to protect your iron and ironing board cover.

  3. #13
    eaglebeak1960's Avatar
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    I went online looking for the Mary Ellen's it is like $42.00 a gallon OUCH!!!!!!!!

    can I get it cheaper??

  4. #14
    eaglebeak1960's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jodimarie
    I am not a pre-washer....my choice....but I am a firm believer in using Magic sizing on EVERYTHING before I cut a strip or square. I spray on a pretty good amount onto the peice of fabric that I'm getting ready to cut, not wet but dampish and then hot iron in every direction I care to go. Nothing easy, I use a hot iron and go to town onto that piece of fabric. In 30 years of quilting, I've never had a top shrink more than th 1-2 percent you find after the first washing and drying when finished before using.

    I buy Magic sizing at WalMart for less that $1.00 a can and it will last through about 2 quilts. I also use it to press blocks and to press the entire quilt top before starting the sandwiching process.

    jodi in leavenworth
    thanks Jodi...

    that is what I was/am having a problem with Magic SIzing gummed up everthing.

  5. #15
    Super Member quiltinghere's Avatar
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    Spray your fabric with your choice of starch or sizing and let it set a minute or so - then it'll be absorbed into the fabric threads where it counts!

  6. #16
    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eaglebeak1960
    I went online looking for the Mary Ellen's it is like $42.00 a gallon OUCH!!!!!!!!

    can I get it cheaper??
    Yes you can get it cheaper. Use a 40% off coupon on joanns.com.

  7. #17
    Moderator kathy's Avatar
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    be sure to shake the sizing can good before each use, I don't have a burning or gumming problem with it, I did with starch

  8. #18
    eaglebeak1960's Avatar
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    thanks Sissor Queen. Kinda out it today having a DUH moment when I replied to this.

    I am trying to get it with out having to pay for shipping. Money tight this time of year.( for all of us I bet).

  9. #19
    Super Member tjradj's Avatar
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    When I use spray starch, I spray one side of the fabric, but iron on the other side. It keeps my iron clean.

  10. #20
    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by magpie
    Vodka is made by the process of distillation of a fermented substance--often potatoes and rye or wheat grain--and less often, sugar beet molasses. Most vodka was traditionally made from potatoes and corn, but in recent years, most high-quality brands of vodka has been distilled from cereal grains. The potatoes and grains are heated until the starch is released and converted to sugar. Then this substance, called a mash, is fermented and heated to a high temperature to allow distillation to occur. The substance is then distilled multiple times until all of the spirit is extracted. Multiple distillations allow for a higher proof. Water is added at the end of the distillation process to decrease the alcohol content, and then the vodka is ready to be bottled and sold

    Read more: How Is Vodka Made? | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/how-does_4574426...#ixzz1819rTKeL
    Which means vodka is sugar. Sure sugar might stiffen it a bit but it's still bug food.

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