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Thread: Starching or Sizing??? any suggestions??

  1. #1
    eaglebeak1960's Avatar
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    ok I am confused I used to use sizing on my fabric when I pulled it out of the dryer (I prewash everything). BUT!!! I have a problem with it I do not like starch or sizing. What it did to my ironing board and bottom of my iron was like putting glue on em!!! never worked right after using sizing.. I have stopped using it. It is an extra cost that never seemed to work for me..

    I need help How do I use it properly??

    How do I keep my iron and board cover from looking and acting like it has glue on it??

    thanks for your help

    Chris

  2. #2
    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
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    Use "Mary Ellen's Best Press."

  3. #3
    Super Member thepolyparrot's Avatar
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    Yes, that stuff is magic, isn't it? Doesn't ever seem to burn or get sticky or leave any residue at all - I don't know what's in it, but it smells like heaven, too. I use it to iron my clothes, not just quilt blocks.

  4. #4
    eaglebeak1960's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scissor Queen
    Use "Mary Ellen's Best Press."
    where can I get it besides the web???

  5. #5
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    I am not a pre-washer....my choice....but I am a firm believer in using Magic sizing on EVERYTHING before I cut a strip or square. I spray on a pretty good amount onto the peice of fabric that I'm getting ready to cut, not wet but dampish and then hot iron in every direction I care to go. Nothing easy, I use a hot iron and go to town onto that piece of fabric. In 30 years of quilting, I've never had a top shrink more than th 1-2 percent you find after the first washing and drying when finished before using.

    I buy Magic sizing at WalMart for less that $1.00 a can and it will last through about 2 quilts. I also use it to press blocks and to press the entire quilt top before starting the sandwiching process.

    jodi in leavenworth

  6. #6
    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eaglebeak1960
    Quote Originally Posted by Scissor Queen
    Use "Mary Ellen's Best Press."
    where can I get it besides the web???
    You're best bet is probably to order it thru Jo-Ann's with a 40% off coupon.

  7. #7
    Power Poster Sadiemae's Avatar
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    Our Hancock's and LQS both carry Mary Ellen's Best Press. If you use it a lot, it is good to purchase by the gallon. If you go to the search button and search, there are also recipes for making your own using Vodka. No, not to drink. lol It is a potato product and works well.

  8. #8
    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sadiemae
    Our Hancock's and LQS both carry Mary Ellen's Best Press. If you use it a lot, it is good to purchase by the gallon. If you go to the search button and search, there are also recipes for making your own using Vodka. No, not to drink. lol It is a potato product and works well.
    Vodka is not starch. It's also bug food.

  9. #9
    Super Member magpie's Avatar
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    Vodka is made by the process of distillation of a fermented substance--often potatoes and rye or wheat grain--and less often, sugar beet molasses. Most vodka was traditionally made from potatoes and corn, but in recent years, most high-quality brands of vodka has been distilled from cereal grains. The potatoes and grains are heated until the starch is released and converted to sugar. Then this substance, called a mash, is fermented and heated to a high temperature to allow distillation to occur. The substance is then distilled multiple times until all of the spirit is extracted. Multiple distillations allow for a higher proof. Water is added at the end of the distillation process to decrease the alcohol content, and then the vodka is ready to be bottled and sold

    Read more: How Is Vodka Made? | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/how-does_4574426...#ixzz1819rTKeL

  10. #10
    Power Poster Sadiemae's Avatar
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    Magpie, you are faster than I am at research.

  11. #11
    Super Member magpie's Avatar
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    sorry i was curious

  12. #12
    Super Member magpie's Avatar
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    Eaglebeak, you could also use a press cloth or parchment paper to protect your iron and ironing board cover.

  13. #13
    eaglebeak1960's Avatar
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    I went online looking for the Mary Ellen's it is like $42.00 a gallon OUCH!!!!!!!!

    can I get it cheaper??

  14. #14
    eaglebeak1960's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jodimarie
    I am not a pre-washer....my choice....but I am a firm believer in using Magic sizing on EVERYTHING before I cut a strip or square. I spray on a pretty good amount onto the peice of fabric that I'm getting ready to cut, not wet but dampish and then hot iron in every direction I care to go. Nothing easy, I use a hot iron and go to town onto that piece of fabric. In 30 years of quilting, I've never had a top shrink more than th 1-2 percent you find after the first washing and drying when finished before using.

    I buy Magic sizing at WalMart for less that $1.00 a can and it will last through about 2 quilts. I also use it to press blocks and to press the entire quilt top before starting the sandwiching process.

    jodi in leavenworth
    thanks Jodi...

    that is what I was/am having a problem with Magic SIzing gummed up everthing.

  15. #15
    Super Member quiltinghere's Avatar
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    Spray your fabric with your choice of starch or sizing and let it set a minute or so - then it'll be absorbed into the fabric threads where it counts!

  16. #16
    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eaglebeak1960
    I went online looking for the Mary Ellen's it is like $42.00 a gallon OUCH!!!!!!!!

    can I get it cheaper??
    Yes you can get it cheaper. Use a 40% off coupon on joanns.com.

  17. #17
    Moderator kathy's Avatar
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    be sure to shake the sizing can good before each use, I don't have a burning or gumming problem with it, I did with starch

  18. #18
    eaglebeak1960's Avatar
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    thanks Sissor Queen. Kinda out it today having a DUH moment when I replied to this.

    I am trying to get it with out having to pay for shipping. Money tight this time of year.( for all of us I bet).

  19. #19
    Super Member tjradj's Avatar
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    When I use spray starch, I spray one side of the fabric, but iron on the other side. It keeps my iron clean.

  20. #20
    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by magpie
    Vodka is made by the process of distillation of a fermented substance--often potatoes and rye or wheat grain--and less often, sugar beet molasses. Most vodka was traditionally made from potatoes and corn, but in recent years, most high-quality brands of vodka has been distilled from cereal grains. The potatoes and grains are heated until the starch is released and converted to sugar. Then this substance, called a mash, is fermented and heated to a high temperature to allow distillation to occur. The substance is then distilled multiple times until all of the spirit is extracted. Multiple distillations allow for a higher proof. Water is added at the end of the distillation process to decrease the alcohol content, and then the vodka is ready to be bottled and sold

    Read more: How Is Vodka Made? | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/how-does_4574426...#ixzz1819rTKeL
    Which means vodka is sugar. Sure sugar might stiffen it a bit but it's still bug food.

  21. #21
    Power Poster Sadiemae's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scissor Queen
    Quote Originally Posted by magpie
    Vodka is made by the process of distillation of a fermented substance--often potatoes and rye or wheat grain--and less often, sugar beet molasses. Most vodka was traditionally made from potatoes and corn, but in recent years, most high-quality brands of vodka has been distilled from cereal grains. The potatoes and grains are heated until the starch is released and converted to sugar. Then this substance, called a mash, is fermented and heated to a high temperature to allow distillation to occur. The substance is then distilled multiple times until all of the spirit is extracted. Multiple distillations allow for a higher proof. Water is added at the end of the distillation process to decrease the alcohol content, and then the vodka is ready to be bottled and sold

    Read more: How Is Vodka Made? | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/how-does_4574426...#ixzz1819rTKeL
    Which means vodka is sugar. Sure sugar might stiffen it a bit but it's still bug food.
    If you have a bug problem, you wouldn't want to make your own. I don't have bug problems.

  22. #22
    Super Member EasyPeezy's Avatar
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    I make my own starch. In a large bowl or pot, stir 1/2 cup cornstarch into
    1 cup of cold water. Stir in boiling water (2 quarts for heavy solution;
    4 quarts for medium and 6 quarts for light solution).

    If you only need a small amount then half or quarter above quantities.
    Sometimes I add a bit more water for the heavy solution as it gets
    a bit too thick. You can try and adjust as you wish.

    When the cornstarch solution is cool, I use a paintbrush to apply it on
    my fabric (stir the solution often or shake if it's in a spray bottle).
    Let is soak for at least 30 mins. If I don't have time to iron
    I just put everything in a ziploc and put it in the fridge for the next day.
    If it's too wet I roll the fabric in a towel first and iron on the wrong side
    with a cloth on top so that the starch doesn't stick to my iron. When
    the heat has absorbed most of the humidity then I continue to iron
    without the cloth. Hope this helps.

    By the way, I finally tried Mary Ellen's Best Press. I wasn't too impressed.
    It's ok for small jobs. I think I'll keep using my cornstarch mixture. :-D

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by eaglebeak1960
    Quote Originally Posted by jodimarie
    I am not a pre-washer....my choice....but I am a firm believer in using Magic sizing on EVERYTHING before I cut a strip or square. I spray on a pretty good amount onto the peice of fabric that I'm getting ready to cut, not wet but dampish and then hot iron in every direction I care to go. Nothing easy, I use a hot iron and go to town onto that piece of fabric. In 30 years of quilting, I've never had a top shrink more than th 1-2 percent you find after the first washing and drying when finished before using.

    I buy Magic sizing at WalMart for less that $1.00 a can and it will last through about 2 quilts. I also use it to press blocks and to press the entire quilt top before starting the sandwiching process.

    jodi in leavenworth
    thanks Jodi...

    that is what I was/am having a problem with Magic SIzing gummed up everthing.
    **************
    Occasionally I will have a piece of fabric ''stick'' to the board. I just ''peel'' it up, repray and iron again. I use the June Taylor pressing boards and not a big regular ironing board and I do designate one pressing board for ''spray use''. I would guess it lasts about 2 years or so before it is shinny and slick....from all the spray build up but for about 8.00 at JoAnns when quilting notions are half off, I figure that is a small price to pay for the great results that I get from Magic spray sizing. I would NOT quilt with out it and buy a case at a time, so I never fun out!!

    jodi in leavenworth

  24. #24
    Super Member oatw13's Avatar
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    You can drape a sheet or other press cloth over your ironing board before you press. Then spray the fabric and let the sizing or starch soak in a bit. You can even let it dry. Then simply wash the press cloth when you are finished.

    I just take off the ironing board cover and wash it when it gets too sticky or dirty. lol

    You can also clean the iron be ironing over a paper bag or piece of wax paper. Or, you can buy drops to clean the plate of your iron at most stores in the laundry aisle.

    Or, use the Mary Ellen's. It smells wonderful.

  25. #25
    Super Member sak658's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scissor Queen
    Quote Originally Posted by eaglebeak1960
    Quote Originally Posted by Scissor Queen
    Use "Mary Ellen's Best Press."
    where can I get it besides the web???
    You're best bet is probably to order it thru Jo-Ann's with a 40% off coupon.
    hancocks has it too, sign up for there mailing list, it has coupons.

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