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Thread: Starching or Sizing??? any suggestions??

  1. #26
    Super Member QuiltnCowgirl's Avatar
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    Ok - as a fairly new quilter I am now wondering when & why I was supposed to be doing this?

  2. #27
    Super Member gale's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EasyPeezy
    I make my own starch. In a large bowl or pot, stir 1/2 cup cornstarch into
    1 cup of cold water. Stir in boiling water (2 quarts for heavy solution;
    4 quarts for medium and 6 quarts for light solution).

    If you only need a small amount then half or quarter above quantities.
    Sometimes I add a bit more water for the heavy solution as it gets
    a bit too thick. You can try and adjust as you wish.

    When the cornstarch solution is cool, I use a paintbrush to apply it on
    my fabric (stir the solution often or shake if it's in a spray bottle).
    Let is soak for at least 30 mins. If I don't have time to iron
    I just put everything in a ziploc and put it in the fridge for the next day.
    If it's too wet I roll the fabric in a towel first and iron on the wrong side
    with a cloth on top so that the starch doesn't stick to my iron. When
    the heat has absorbed most of the humidity then I continue to iron
    without the cloth. Hope this helps.

    By the way, I finally tried Mary Ellen's Best Press. I wasn't too impressed.
    It's ok for small jobs. I think I'll keep using my cornstarch mixture. :-D
    It seems like that would attract bugs worse than vodka. If you have a bug problem, that is.

  3. #28
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    If you let starch or sizing dry into the fabric, you will find that your iron and cover will stay cleaner :D:D:D

  4. #29
    Super Member EasyPeezy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gale
    It seems like that would attract bugs worse than vodka. If you have a bug problem, that is.
    I try to keep a close eye on this. ;)

  5. #30
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    I was told by a quilting teacher to use sizing because starch attracts silver fish. I have not seen any silverfish in years but am afraid to take a chance, don't want little holes in my quilts.

  6. #31
    Power Poster Sadiemae's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ibequilting1
    I was told by a quilting teacher to use sizing because starch attracts silver fish. I have not seen any silverfish in years but am afraid to take a chance, don't want little holes in my quilts.
    I was curious about these so I googled. It explained why I had never heard of them. They require a humididty above 75%, which we never reach.

  7. #32

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    I got mine at Hancock Fabrics and just love to use it. By far the best ever.

    dude

  8. #33
    Super Member girlsfour's Avatar
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    Best Press is best!!!! If you live near a Hancock Fabrics, watch their ads and buy it when it goes on sale. Or support your local quilt shop and purchase it from them.

  9. #34
    community benefactor stitchofclass2's Avatar
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    I was told that starch is a food product and if you use it on your quilt and then store it, it could be eaten by critters. Just passing this along for what it's worth.

  10. #35
    Super Member quilt3311's Avatar
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    When I spray the sizing on the fabric I let it rest until the fabric absorbs the stuff. then press with hot iron. I don't have any problem with gunk on the iron that way.

  11. #36
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    Sizing has a higher scorching temperature than starch and I find that even if I need 2 coats it works better. Two light coats are better than 'saturating' the fabric. Also, I spray on one side, then flip it over and press on the other side.

    I was taught in heirloom sewing that if you use sizing before you mark the fabric with a water soluable pen your marks don't 'penetrate' the fibers and is removed much more easily.

    Peggy
    Freezing in Fla where we're supposed to break 3 records in 24 hours. (Two record lows and one record minimum (high)!

  12. #37
    Super Member girlsfour's Avatar
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    I am told that regular starch has sugar in it. So, if you plan to store your fabric for an extended period of time, skip starching when pressing. Best Press does not have sugar in it.

  13. #38
    Power Poster Sadiemae's Avatar
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    I wash my quilts as soon as they are finished, so whatever I use is washed away.

  14. #39
    Super Member misseva's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tjradj
    When I use spray starch, I spray one side of the fabric, but iron on the other side. It keeps my iron clean.
    agree with above plus - i use my hand to wipe down the fabric and/or just smush it together, then iron. it's the unabsorbed starch/sizing that's sticking to your iron.

  15. #40
    Super Member misseva's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EasyPeezy
    I make my own starch. In a large bowl or pot, stir 1/2 cup cornstarch into
    1 cup of cold water. Stir in boiling water (2 quarts for heavy solution;
    4 quarts for medium and 6 quarts for light solution).

    If you only need a small amount then half or quarter above quantities.
    Sometimes I add a bit more water for the heavy solution as it gets
    a bit too thick. You can try and adjust as you wish.

    When the cornstarch solution is cool, I use a paintbrush to apply it on
    my fabric (stir the solution often or shake if it's in a spray bottle).
    Let is soak for at least 30 mins. If I don't have time to iron
    I just put everything in a ziploc and put it in the fridge for the next day.
    If it's too wet I roll the fabric in a towel first and iron on the wrong side
    with a cloth on top so that the starch doesn't stick to my iron. When
    the heat has absorbed most of the humidity then I continue to iron
    without the cloth. Hope this helps.

    By the way, I finally tried Mary Ellen's Best Press. I wasn't too impressed.
    It's ok for small jobs. I think I'll keep using my cornstarch mixture. :-D
    are you actually using cornstarch like we cook with or the old timey starch that my mother and i used to use?

  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by EasyPeezy
    By the way, I finally tried Mary Ellen's Best Press. I wasn't too impressed.
    It's ok for small jobs. I think I'll keep using my cornstarch mixture. :-D
    I wasn't keen on the Best Press either. It just didn't seem to do the job. I will continue to use sizing.

  17. #42
    Super Member EasyPeezy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by misseva
    Quote Originally Posted by EasyPeezy
    I make my own starch. In a large bowl or pot, stir 1/2 cup cornstarch into
    1 cup of cold water. Stir in boiling water (2 quarts for heavy solution;
    4 quarts for medium and 6 quarts for light solution).

    If you only need a small amount then half or quarter above quantities.
    Sometimes I add a bit more water for the heavy solution as it gets
    a bit too thick. You can try and adjust as you wish.

    When the cornstarch solution is cool, I use a paintbrush to apply it on
    my fabric (stir the solution often or shake if it's in a spray bottle).
    Let is soak for at least 30 mins. If I don't have time to iron
    I just put everything in a ziploc and put it in the fridge for the next day.
    If it's too wet I roll the fabric in a towel first and iron on the wrong side
    with a cloth on top so that the starch doesn't stick to my iron. When
    the heat has absorbed most of the humidity then I continue to iron
    without the cloth. Hope this helps.

    By the way, I finally tried Mary Ellen's Best Press. I wasn't too impressed.
    It's ok for small jobs. I think I'll keep using my cornstarch mixture. :-D
    are you actually using cornstarch like we cook with or the old timey starch that my mother and i used to use?
    Cornstarch for cooking.

  18. #43
    Super Member Mariah's Avatar
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    I have learned at our guild to use Sizing. Starch has a protein-base, and moths, ect, are attracted to it. Sizing is not filled with those properties. I have never had any problem with moths finding my quited items.
    Good luck!
    Mariah.

  19. #44
    Senior Member olebat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EasyPeezy
    I make my own starch. In a large bowl or pot, stir 1/2 cup cornstarch into
    1 cup of cold water. Stir in boiling water (2 quarts for heavy solution;
    4 quarts for medium and 6 quarts for light solution).

    If you only need a small amount then half or quarter above quantities.
    Sometimes I add a bit more water for the heavy solution as it gets
    a bit too thick. You can try and adjust as you wish.

    When the cornstarch solution is cool, I use a paintbrush to apply it on
    my fabric (stir the solution often or shake if it's in a spray bottle).
    Let is soak for at least 30 mins. If I don't have time to iron
    I just put everything in a ziploc and put it in the fridge for the next day.
    If it's too wet I roll the fabric in a towel first and iron on the wrong side
    with a cloth on top so that the starch doesn't stick to my iron. When
    the heat has absorbed most of the humidity then I continue to iron
    without the cloth. Hope this helps.

    By the way, I finally tried Mary Ellen's Best Press. I wasn't too impressed.
    It's ok for small jobs. I think I'll keep using my cornstarch mixture. :-D
    What memories! I'm in the process of writing a series of articles about my earliest days of quilting, when I was about 6. I remember mixing the cornstarch and dipping my finger in the mixture and rubbing the seams and edges of the Sunbonnet Sue before pressing. I hated that I had to wait until after supper before we could do that, but it was summer time, and there was no fire in the stove to heat the irons. Ironing could only be done after breakfast, or after the supper dishes were done. My mother had an electric iron and used liquid starch - But Granny, Ah, yes, corn starch and irons on the wood stove.

  20. #45
    Super Member JAGSD's Avatar
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    Does Best Press come with no scent? or is it all scented?

  21. #46
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    I wouldn't trust the Internet source of the information that said silverfish require high humidity.

    I grew up in the desert where the humidity is rarely higher than 30 percent and is frequently lower and my mother was in a constant battle with silverfish.

    froggyintexas

  22. #47
    paristx's Avatar
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    Leah Day at Daystylesdesign.com has a great video on her website about starching and since I've seen it I haven't had any problems when I starch my fabric. Very detailed info. I was doing it all wrong before. Here's a link to the video: http://www.daystyledesigns.com/starchfabric.htm

  23. #48
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    I make my own starch. I used a recipe I found here on the QB. I use stay-flow, water and fabreeze. I adjust the amount of starch depending on how stiff I want the fabric... usually 1/2 starch to all the liquid.

  24. #49
    Super Member Jill's Avatar
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    I have used sizing for years without any problems. I like it much better than starch. I was sandwiching a quilt today using basting spray today and noticed one area just was not sticking at all. I tried it again with the same result...then noticed I was using sizing instead of basting spray!

  25. #50
    Super Member IBQUILTIN's Avatar
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    The trick that works for me is to WAIT a minute or so for the starch or siing to soak in before ironing. It doesn't seem to gunk up as bad, and clean your iron with salt on a dry washcloth every so often

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