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Thread: another dog?

  1. #1
    Senior Member Catherine Marie's Avatar
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    In April 2010 we had to relocate our 9 year old schnauzer because of a family issue.
    The issue has been resolved but our little guy now lives somewhere else and the rescue group that took him keeps everything confidential anyway. I know for a fact though that he is in a comfortable home and the new family loves him dearly.
    Anyway, I can't seem to live without a dog in the house. We would like to rescue an older puppy or dog from a rescue group. But I'm afraid.
    Who has rescued a dog either from a shelter or rescue group and when it is an older dog, how do you get to know them or train them or rehabilitate them? My husband, I'm afraid, will expect a dog that is instantly trained and no bother and all of the training will be on my shoulders, which is ok, but am I up for the work? I hope so. But is there anyone who can give me some hints. And I think I know about the joy I'll feel because I've rescued, etc. just give me a reality check on this one...thanks.
    PS You can see from my avatar the little guy we had to relocate. He is the gold standard for every dog we see/meet.

  2. #2
    bj
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    Super Member bj's Avatar
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    We lost our boxer to a long battle with cancer and heart disease. We just adopted a one year old puppy from a boxer rescue group. Here in Austin, they have adoption events where several of the dogs will be and you just see if one bonds with you. My dh got hold of this one and it was love at first site. You just have to be prepared for health issues (ours is lightly heartworm positive and we are dealing with that). They will be able to tell you if the dog you choose is good with kids, other dogs or cats. We are really enjoying our dog. He was very quiet at first, but is coming out of his shell some now. You can tell he didn't get much attention because he wants to sit right by you, touching some part of you all the time. He was very underweight, which is not unusual in a rescue dog, but is eating well and gaining weight. He is crate trained and mostly house trained. We take him out pretty often, but he has had a couple of accidents. Good luck.

  3. #3
    Power Poster CarrieAnne's Avatar
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    Oh, this is one of my VERY favorite topics.....
    One of my very favorite dogs, was little Sugar, a Hurricane Katrina rescue. My little JRT had just died, and our lab needed a new friend. I found her picture at Petfinders...its funny, I saw her, and KNEW I wanted HER. I emailed then called the lady...she had been in a vet clinic for almost a year, w/ a bunch of other dogs. They thought she was a JRT/Pug mix, and she was so goofy looking.
    We drove two hours to Barrington , Ill, to see her....they werent supposed to let me take her home til they did a home visit, but they knew I loved her, and let me.
    It really was great, she was trained well...did have a few accidents in the house, til I KNEW her. She would go to the door and stare at it, never bark. I always figured she must have been taught not to bark. Perhaps she lived in an apartment.
    I took her everywhere, people got a kick out of her, she was so ugly she was cute....huge eyes, overbite, chubby....
    She lived with me two and a half years, til she started to get real sick...vet sent her to a specialist in Madison, they did tons of tests, couldnt really find anything, so they put her on steroids. helped for a while, but then she became diabetic, and got pancritis, and her liver gave out. Man, did I cry....she really was the greatest little dog. Vet figured she was elderly when I got her...no one really knew.
    PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE rescue if you can! There are so many diamonds in therough out there. So many new pet searches too....you can say what size, type, age,almost anything.I must have called the rescue a hundred times to askquestions...but SO worth it! You do have to do your reseach to make sure the new pet will fit your family, but I know in my case, it went really smooth!!!!!!!!
    Good luck with your search, if I can help in any way, holler at me!!!!!!!

  4. #4
    Super Member raptureready's Avatar
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    We adopted, or should I say she adopted us, a Bassador that had been rescued from an abusive/neglectful home. The first few weeks she was extremely timid, wouldn't let us pet her, would cower when we tried, but was housebroken even though we were told she had been an outside dog. When she realized that she was going to fed and loved, she became very protective of her new family--to the point of being a little over aggressive. Now that we've had her for a year, she's realized that she's here to stay and has calmed down and become a wonderful addition to our family. We can even let the grandchildren around her without fear. She's so happy now. Humans always need time to adjust to any new situation (you had to adjust when you had a baby didn't you? and when they left home? lol) It's the same with animals, they need time to adjust.

    half lab, half basset

  5. #5
    Power Poster CarrieAnne's Avatar
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    Bassador, LOL, I was wondering what that was. I bet its a great dog...labs are so nice, and bassets, who couldnt love a basset, lol?
    I wanted to say, most people I know that get rescues say the dogs nearly worship them! I think they are SO thankful to have a good home!!!!!!!!!!

  6. #6
    Super Member janRN's Avatar
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    Patches, the dog in my avatar is my "I'm never getting another dog" dog. We lost our Dalmatian and I swore I'd never be able to love another dog without comparing him to the one we lost. Nine months after losing him, a patient came in crying; she found a part Dalmatian starving and tied to a tree stump--would I please take him. I called DH and said go to Walmart, get dog things, we're getting a dog (this was Christmas Eve.) He was not happy to say the least but I told him we're getting this dog (we make all big decisions together but not this one!) Got Patches who was 20 lbs, missing part of an ear, has a chunk out of his tail, and no hair on one leg. Brought him home-no accidents, LOVES to eat actually dances when we're putting food in his bowl. He's now at normal wt of 65 lbs and he fit in like he was born here.
    It was much easier to get an older dog (no clue how old Patches is).
    I like the idea of spending time with a few dogs to see how they react to you and others. I didn't have that opportunity and just got plain lucky.
    Rescued dogs do come with some baggage: mine is deathly afraid of loud noises, gun shots, hammers, etc. Talk to the rescuers and ask about stuff like that.
    Good luck and bless you for doing this. I thank God everyday for Patches--I can't imagine my house without him.

  7. #7
    Super Member shaverg's Avatar
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    We did adopt an American Eskimo when he was 9 mo, he is now 14. The first two weeks were great and then he started to bite. We don't, have children so we had him professionally trained, but have still had problems for the whole 13 years. They think he may have been a puppy mill pup. He is my avatar. Although I would not trade a day, it has been heartbreaking. Most people do not have this problem. But please make sure you are ready for another dog. If you had to let a dog you had for 9 years be relocated for some reason, please question if you are really ready. If there is any chance you would have to do that again, don't adopt a pet. Our Jake is family, we decide what we do by how it will affect him, our life has been dictated by him for 13 years, but we love him dearly. And for us he has been the best and smartest dog we have ever had, but it has been a trying 13 years.

  8. #8
    Power Poster CarrieAnne's Avatar
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    Ja, your story is so great! I love Patches!
    Shaverg, your story is so heartbreaking, but I really want to say tis great that you have stuck by him, and tried the proffesional trainers and all...must be so hard.....

  9. #9
    Super Member shaverg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CarrieAnne
    Ja, your story is so great! I love Patches!
    Shaverg, your story is so heartbreaking, but I really want to say tis great that you have stuck by him, and tried the proffesional trainers and all...must be so hard.....
    Pets are family members and a true commitment. I hate to see anyone take an animal that has already been through so much taken into a home that is not truely ready. We did think we might have to have Jake put to sleep, which broke our heart he just refused to let anyone in our house and could be so vicious for such a little dog. His eyes would just glaze and he would go balistic. We even had them do xrays to see if maybe he had a brain tumor and if we had to give him up we were going to drive him to Best Friends, they take in unadoptable dogs. We were going to offer them a big donation if for some reason they didn't think they could take him. But found a way to work with him for 13 years. What is funny is he loves anyone that is our family, won't tolerate anyone else still to this day.

    I also recommend crate training. It is a blessing. I have always had dogs and never had a crate trained dog until Jake. I will never have another dog that is not crate trained again.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Catherine Marie's Avatar
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    So far the idea of rescuing and adopting is becoming clearer to me and also the idea of keeping an older dog/puppy from a fate...well who knows what, is indeed a worthy undertaking from you accounts.
    Your experiences have been most heartening. I know that these dogs can come with baggage as I know others who have rescued. My own little guy was 7 mos. when we got him from a breeder. And there were some early experiences he just never let go. ( He would cower when I took out the fly swatter to get a bug!)
    As far as being ready, there is no question that I am. He had to leave because of a serious health issue with my newborn grandson. I heard from many who were on on side of the fence or the other about relocating but in order for me to be the kind of Nana I am, it was then 'the easiest hardest decision' I had to make.
    I did hear through the Schnauzer Rescue who said our guy was welcomed into a wonderful home and the new family didn't know what they did before they got him but then they would not have had 'the perfect individual' ( their words)that he indeed is.
    It wasn't the best situation but our grandson comes first.

  11. #11
    Super Member shaverg's Avatar
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    Catherine Marie, I didn't mean to sound harsh. But when you mentioned your husband might expect a dog that is trained, I guess I read betwwen the lines to say may not meet his expectations. I just didn't want to see another pup adopted and it not work out.

    Trust me we had to think seriously about possibly giving up Jake and I wondered at times if we had made the wrong decision, but glad we stuck with him. So I do know there are times when there is not other choice, I understand your previous decision. So it sounds like even if a dog did not meet your dh expectations you would still hang in there.

    I have to admit, I will be thinking twice about adopting another shelter pup, with all we have been through with Jake. But when he is gone, which we hope is quite a while from now. There will not be another for a while. Which makes me sad, but dh, who loves Jake just as much as I do. Doesn't want the chance the heartache we had with our Jake.

  12. #12
    Power Poster MadQuilter's Avatar
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    We adopted a 2 1/2 year-old black lab/hound mix Heidi and a 1 1/2 year old same breed Sadie. Both have issues. Heidi has treat aggression and it took a lot of patience to work through that. It's not 100% but she only growls at me when she is in the moment right after she has killed a rat. At least she will trade up for a Greenie. lol

    Sadie is an unbelievably independent dog. She knows her name but does not always listen when called. She is a sweet girl though.

    I think you can get a feel for the dog at the shelter. (I go by intuition a lot).

    We were looking at another dog, and the shelter worker advised against it. Saids she was a bit "off"

  13. #13
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    If dh is not "with you" on this - I would think long and hard about it.

    I adopted another cat and my dh has been an ish about it for over 15 years.

  14. #14
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    Catherine Marie,

    We adopted our dog Ricky from the Hamilton Burlington Humane Society in March of 2009. He came up with 129 other dogs from central Lousiana. He is the best dog... he doesn't bark, sleep on our bed, have acciedents in the house... nothing. If you didn't see the dog bowls you wouldn't know he's here. We also have 3 cats, whom he gets along with extremely well.

    Even though BARK no longer brings dogs to Hamilton, we would adopt through them in a heartbeat. We nearly went to CO at Xmas to get a Great Pyr we picked out...

    This morning Stephen said that Ricky adopted us, we didn't adopt him.

    Ricky is a Maremma Sheepdog X (looks like a golden retriver/great pry mix) he only sheds twice a year so it's not to bad.

    The only issue I have to say is Ricky still doesn't like our trailer. He only eats on the couch from your hand!

    Ricky ran away from the boys last July 1st after they didn't listen to me. Thier dad found him 5 miles away at the bottom of a 40 ft ravine 11 hours later. He still had his leash on and everything. I am so greatful someone was looking out for us and Ricky, because it took the boy's dad 20 years to convince me to get a dog!

    I hope you'll get another dog soon, check out HBHS they usually have a good selection and are easy to deal with.

    Theresa

  15. #15
    a regular here hazeljane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Catherine Marie
    So far the idea of rescuing and adopting is becoming clearer to me and also the idea of keeping an older dog/puppy from a fate...well who knows what, is indeed a worthy undertaking from you accounts.
    Your experiences have been most heartening. I know that these dogs can come with baggage as I know others who have rescued. My own little guy was 7 mos. when we got him from a breeder. And there were some early experiences he just never let go. ( He would cower when I took out the fly swatter to get a bug!)
    As far as being ready, there is no question that I am. He had to leave because of a serious health issue with my newborn grandson. I heard from many who were on on side of the fence or the other about relocating but in order for me to be the kind of Nana I am, it was then 'the easiest hardest decision' I had to make.
    I did hear through the Schnauzer Rescue who said our guy was welcomed into a wonderful home and the new family didn't know what they did before they got him but then they would not have had 'the perfect individual' ( their words)that he indeed is.
    It wasn't the best situation but our grandson comes first.


    Catherine-

    My husband and I run a small non-profit Italian Greyhound rescue. I think if you go through a rescue group that fosters its dogs, instead of holding them in a kennel situation like a pound, you might have better luck.

    We try very hard to match up the dog's needs and the family's needs/wants, because the last thing we want is for the dog to be back into the cycle of rescue. So most of the time, the foster parent is familiar with: potty habits, trainablility, issues with kids/cats/other pets, personality and need for attention/exercise, etc. Often someone calls me because they have fallen in love with the picture on Petfinder, but the dog that they're looking for is not that dog. If there is not a dog here that meets the family's needs, I often use my connections to see if I can find them one.

    A dog that has been fostered has at least the beginning of training, and you will have a whole lot more information with which to make a decision.

    Good Luck!

    Maggie

  16. #16
    Super Member MissM's Avatar
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    I would recommend rescue dogs any time. We have rescued two. A Minpin named Little Bit we rescued from an elderly lady who was dying of cancer and couldn't keep her any more. She is so attached to my DH, she "cries" if he so much as steps out into the garage where she can't she him. The other one we rescued is Bella, a Jack Rat who the local humane society had rescued when the owners moved away and left her tied to a tree with no food or water. She is so attached to me, she sits in my chair all day while I am gone to work and the minute I come home she is attached to my side until I leave in the morning. In the picture below she is sitting on top of Alice, our Doberman, who will be 15 years old on July 6. We have had her since she was 6 weeks old.

    Little Bit & Her Bone
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    Bella on Top & Lady Alice Below
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  17. #17
    Senior Member Catherine Marie's Avatar
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    You people are awesome. How kind you have been to answer my request so thoroughly. Also, kudos to you for rescuing dogs and puppies from all sorts of places. No doubt your dogs feel the extra love given to them because of their rocky histories. I'll be keeping you posted.

  18. #18
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    Many years ago an office manager rescued a Doberman male from a
    research lab on the CA coast, and had him in her office. For some reason,
    someone gave her our name since my old Dobie had gone on to that Rainbow
    Bridge a couple of years before. So Kurt came into our lives, he was quiet and
    very cool, at least until he could trust us. Obviously a pure bred,well trained
    and even with his nails clipped, no owner could ever be found. We gradually
    fell in love with him, and with his calm, quiet manners he was still a savage
    guard when our young daughters walked him and stayed out till nearly dark.
    He even was invited to my son's kindergarten class to show the kids how a
    dog should act. Even at one baby sitting chore in a not so nice address, the
    single mother asked if both Kurt and my daughter could baby sit!!

    Other Dobies we took in were characters in their own right, but Kurt was the
    finest one of all. And the vet said that I did things right, I, myself, was pack
    leader, and everyone had to obey me. Otherwise, you will have a huge, very
    powerful juvenile delinquent that will not listen to you at all, and could be dangerous to others.

  19. #19
    Senior Member Sandy1951's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hazeljane
    Catherine-

    My husband and I run a small non-profit Italian Greyhound rescue. I think if you go through a rescue group that fosters its dogs, instead of holding them in a kennel situation like a pound, you might have better luck.

    We try very hard to match up the dog's needs and the family's needs/wants, because the last thing we want is for the dog to be back into the cycle of rescue. So most of the time, the foster parent is familiar with: potty habits, trainablility, issues with kids/cats/other pets, personality and need for attention/exercise, etc. Often someone calls me because they have fallen in love with the picture on Petfinder, but the dog that they're looking for is not that dog. If there is not a dog here that meets the family's needs, I often use my connections to see if I can find them one.

    A dog that has been fostered has at least the beginning of training, and you will have a whole lot more information with which to make a decision.

    Good Luck!

    Maggie
    I've been looking at rescue groups in Ohio for a new dog recently. We lost our beloved little 11-year-old Pekingese, Sammy, a few months ago. We moved in January from a house with a fenced in backyard to a house with no fence, which is also on a major highway. I was terrified that Sammy would get on the highway and be hit. At first we only took him out on a leash, but then we started taking him out without the leash, but we always stayed with him. He was very good and never went near the highway...until the time he did. My daughter and son-in-law and one of my granddaughters were visiting. I was getting dinner on, but I told my daughter I needed to take Sammy out before we ate. My daughter asked her husband to take him out for me. I cautioned my SIL to watch him closely, which he said he would. Well, in all the commotion of getting everyone fed I didn't realize he didn't bring my little Sammy back in the house. My daughter had been hammering a lot as she helped me hang pictures and Sammy had stayed back in the bedroom all afternoon. I just assumed he went back there. While we were eating, I said to my SIL, "You did bring Sammy back in, right?" I honestly thought he did and Sammy had gone back to the bedroom. I almost died when my SIL jumped up and said, "I think so, didn't I?" Well, no, he didn't. We found my sweet little buddy on the other side of the highway with his head smashed in. He was blind in one eye and this was the side that was hit. Whoever was driving didn't even stop.

    Sammy was such great company for me. I'm home all day and I used to talk to him constantly. He understood everything I said and he always stayed with me. I miss him so much; losing him broke my heart.

    Anyway, I've been thinking I might be almost ready for another dog, so I've spent quite a lot of time looking at sites for rescue groups, pounds, and humane societies. I've noticed a huge difference between the descriptions of dogs from some of the rescue sites than from those at pounds or humane societies. Like Maggie said, the descriptions of dogs from the better rescue sites that are in foster homes are much more complete and include potty habits, trainability, issues with kids/cats/other pets, personality and need for attention/exercise, etc. I can't get a dog that will be aggressive toward our granddaughters or three cats. And I prefer getting one that is already housebroken, although I realize there might be some accidents during the adjustment period. I don't want a puppy mill dog.

    There's a rescue group about 18 miles from us that seems to be one of the best ones I've checked out. They've had two dogs recently that fit all my criteria, but in both cases someone else applied and received adoption approval before we had a chance to apply. I plan to check the site more often and I think based on what Maggie said, I'll also contact the woman who operates the rescue group so she can be on the lookout for a dog that will fit our family.

    Catherine, thanks for bringing this up and Maggie, thanks for your good advice. Also thanks to everyone else who posted.

    My sweet little Sammy
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  20. #20
    Super Member quilter1's Avatar
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    We took in a Golden Retriever who has been used to make puppies. Poor little thing was used up and still under 2 years old. The owner begged us to take her and find a family or she was going to the pound, so we agreed. Next day we took her to the vet, bad news, she had about a week to live and it would cost a bundle to save her. What do you do? She had a non functioning thyroid, massive skin infections and other issues. She was so weak that she had to be carried up 6 stairs. Well you know the end of the story, she found a family all right- here with us. She bonded with my DH, who sat with her in the tub and massaged her infected skin with soap and lotion for days. She recovered and is now absolutely beautiful, a healthy white Golden with adoring eyes. We have had her now 4 years and just adore her. She has bonded with our other 2 Goldens really well. They are such good dogs! That's our Anna, she suits her name, so gentle. Jonah and Sam love her too.

  21. #21
    Super Member shaverg's Avatar
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    OMG, Sandy, your story breaks my heart.

  22. #22
    Senior Member Sandy1951's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by shaverg
    OMG, Sandy, your story breaks my heart.
    Thanks, shaverg, for caring. I was crying the entire time I wrote it. (Maybe I'm not ready for another dog.) The day after Sammy was killed I asked my DH if he had any idea why our SIL was so careless. I just couldn't believe he left him outside, especially after I cautioned him to watch Sammy closely. Their dog was here, too, and he brought her back inside. How could he forget Sammy? My DH and SIL were working outside the entire day while my DD and I worked inside. When I asked my DH how he thought it happened, he said SIL had been drinking beer all day. I'd noticed my DH was in a grouchy mood when he came in; he didn't say anything that night, but when I asked him what he thought the next day, he said SIL had been drinking beer all day and he kept breaking equipment and doing stupid things because he was drinking so much. My DH reminded me that SIL seems to have some adult ADD and the drinking makes it worse. I had no idea he was drinking that much or I would never never have let him take Sammy out. I know my DD thought she was helping me out by asking him to take the dogs out because I was tired and trying to finish up dinner, but I should have gone with my gut instinct and taken them out myself. After they went outside, my 5-year-old granddaughter and I went into the living room to close the drapes as it was getting dark. We saw Sammy doing his business out the side window, then scampering off towards the garage. I told Morgan, "See, I knew Sammy had to go. Mothers always know when their little boys need to go potty." That was the last time I saw him alive.

    Our 8-year-old granddaughter had gone to stay overnight with a friend. The next day she told me she wished she would have been here because she would have watched Sammy and brought him in. She would have too, bless her heart.

    My DH felt guilty because he'd promised me he would build a fence for Sammy before we got moved, but he didn't get it done. There was just too much to do.

    I know Sammy wouldn't have lived many more years as he was 11 and 13 is the average life span for Pekingese dogs. He also had health problems and was on medication. Still, he loved life and he loved us. I really do miss him so much.

  23. #23
    JJs
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    We adopted two retired breeders. They were NOT back-yard breeders - they lived in the home, but were not pets.
    Had attention every day but not cuddled.
    Anyway, one is three and the other is 4 - tiny, toy poodles, and they are both fantastic. So if you can find a retired breeder that was not living in a crate in a backyard jammed with lots of crates....
    These two had always had their shots, saw the vet, been spayed when we got them, etc...

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