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Thread: Hubbard Squash

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    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
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    Hubbard Squash

    I was gifted with two of these Hubbard Squashes. I gave one to my DD and she and her family had family fun by putting theirs in a clean trash bag and dropping it off the deck to the driveway to break it up for baking. I prefer baking mine whole, so did that yesterday while quilting. After the quilting, I was too tired to scoop and mash it last night, so did that this morning. Since the temp today will not go above zero, I'm using my deck to freeze the six large packages. This should last me a good long time... yummmm
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    Nancy in western NY
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  2. #2
    cjr
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    I grew up in PA rural. These were a wintwer staple. Hard to come by here. But I would not trade the sunshine for squash. Enjoy!! May I pop in when you are serving your hubbard?? Love them
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    Super Member SouthPStitches's Avatar
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    Oh those Hubbard squash! Definitely the best tasting and textured of the winter squash but so much work. They grow so large, it would be easy getting a hernia carrying them around. Surprised your driveway doesn't have cracks in it now. Almost need to run those stinkers through a table saw to get them in half as no ordinary knife will do the job. You have some good eating ahead of you. Do you add butter, brown sugar, salt and pepper?

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    Mmmmm, good! I like to do freezer bags full of butternut squash but I cut them in chunks raw. A lot of people find it difficult to cut up squash but I cheat. I use a huge butcher knife and my kitchen hammer. You need a butcher knife that has the metal all the way through the handle and big enough that the tip extends past the squash. I hold the knife handle while hitting the knife tip to go down through the squash. After it is in slices, it is easier to peel for the freezer bag.

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    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SouthPStitches View Post
    Oh those Hubbard squash! Definitely the best tasting and textured of the winter squash but so much work. They grow so large, it would be easy getting a hernia carrying them around. Surprised your driveway doesn't have cracks in it now. Almost need to run those stinkers through a table saw to get them in half as no ordinary knife will do the job. You have some good eating ahead of you. Do you add butter, brown sugar, salt and pepper?
    i would love to add those ingredients.... unfortunately, i'm on a diet for the next few months
    Nancy in western NY
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    That kept you busy during this below zero cold spell. Always wondered how people cut them up. Off the deck onto the driveway sounds good to me! Stay warm.

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    Super Member wraez's Avatar
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    I don't think I have ever eaten this kind of squash but I know my dad says he loved the way his mom (my grandmother) made it when he was a kid ... they had a large farm and a large garden.

    I remember gramma making a tasty pie she called 'ground cherry' pie ... the fruit was green and had a papery-lantern like covering ... she grew them in her garden too.
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    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
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    Oh my Husband used to do all the cooking and had a garden. We ate a lot of Squash. Now I cook and don't do squash. pretty though!!

  9. #9
    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wraez View Post
    I don't think I have ever eaten this kind of squash but I know my dad says he loved the way his mom (my grandmother) made it when he was a kid ... they had a large farm and a large garden.

    I remember gramma making a tasty pie she called 'ground cherry' pie ... the fruit was green and had a papery-lantern like covering ... she grew them in her garden too.
    the Hubbard tastes very much like the Butternut, which is my all-time favorite.

    you brought back memories with the ground cherries. i had to look it up... the true name is Physalis. the source i found says that it can be used as a hallucinogen and is outlawed in Louisiana for purposes other than decoration
    Nancy in western NY
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    " I prefer baking mine whole..."

    question: if you bake it whole, isn't there a chance it could explode in the oven if there's no vent for steam to escape?
    Like a potato can explode in the oven if there are no vent slits.

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    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by postal packin' mama View Post
    " I prefer baking mine whole..."

    question: if you bake it whole, isn't there a chance it could explode in the oven if there's no vent for steam to escape?
    Like a potato can explode in the oven if there are no vent slits.
    I suppose that is a possibility. I've never had it happen to me, thankfully. This particular squash, on the side touching the ground, there seemed to be a hole from something. Maybe that helped.
    Nancy in western NY
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    Super Member Chasing Hawk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by postal packin' mama View Post
    " I prefer baking mine whole..."

    question: if you bake it whole, isn't there a chance it could explode in the oven if there's no vent for steam to escape?
    Like a potato can explode in the oven if there are no vent slits.
    Perhaps a cordless drill with a small bit would help.
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    Super Member Snooze2978's Avatar
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    I had a bunch of butternut squash to prepare for the freezer. I used an electric knife to cut and peel it before I baked it and froze. Sure beats hurting the hands with a regular knife.

    Suz in Iowa

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    One year we grew them and they were enormous! Had to get a wheelbarrow out to get them from the garden to house. Then how to get into them? Axe was useless and we finally resorted to the drop it from the second story method :-) We had about 50 of them and donated most to the Mission for Thanksgiving dinner. Still had enough in the freezer for a year.
    Maggie

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    Don't know if this tip will work for Hubbard squash, but it works for acorn squash - microwave for one to two minutes, let cool briefly, then cut with large butcher knife. You may want to rotate the squash after one minute in the microwave. Works like a charm for acorn type.

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    UUUm! What a biggie squash - love squash, and you just reminded me I have a butternut in my cupboard waiting for the right moment - which I think will be this afternoon, since it's so cold I want an excuse to turn on my oven. Thanks!
    KEEP CALM and CARRY ON!!

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    Smart thinking!!
    Grandma of 5 beautiful grand kids, 4 crazy cats & 1 dog!

  18. #18
    Super Member ube quilting's Avatar
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    I love this squash. Very old variety you don't see it in stores but at farmers markets or grow yor own. Delishious!
    We always called them Blue Hubbards but may be a different variety.
    I like the idea of smashing them off the deck to break them for roasting!
    peace

    EDIT: For those who try to peel BN squash or any squash for that matter. Save some time and don't.

    Just cut a small piece off the largrer end so it is flat. Stand it up and use a good heavy butcher knife to cut through the length of the squash.

    Scoop out the seed ball. place the squash cut side down on oiled baking pan and bake at 350 or 400 degrees untill a fork goes through it. The meat of the squash will just scrape right out of the skin after it cools enough to handle and you don't even have to mash it.

    Love squash and treat it right . Don't boil it!
    peace
    Last edited by ube quilting; 01-25-2013 at 06:48 PM.
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