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Thread: I couldn't believe this.

  1. #26
    Super Member Sandygirl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tartan View Post
    Wow, who knew quilter's are keeping the whole iron industry afloat!

    Esp when you read " no one irons anymore"! Or..." no one sews anymore!". Lol!

    to be fair...I have never churned butter...
    sandy
    Sandygirl

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  2. #27
    Super Member Sandygirl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by K-Roll View Post
    This is a true story. A man called our emergency services complaining about his girlfriend who "hit him with a smoof."
    A what, sir? She hit you with what?
    "She hit me with a damn smoof!"
    Please describe it to me, I don't understand.
    "A smoof! A smoof! You know, what you use to smoof your clothes with..."
    He was talking about an iron. I will never forget it. I love language and dialects, and this was a new one on me and I've been around for a while.
    I only use my smoof for quilting, too, unless I get antsy and decide to smoof our cloth napkins.
    Maybe "smooth" your clothes? Imassumevthat the girlfriend wanted to smooth things out?

    Sandy
    Sandygirl

    Janome 9900 / Janome 9700 / Janome Decor 3050 / Janome 1100D serger
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  3. #28
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    It's a scary world they are inheriting.

  4. #29
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    I was a home economics teacher before becoming a full time homemaker when our family came along. I felt valued in every sense of the word. With facts and numbers I could show your that when you employ homemaking skills you probably don't need a second salary. We had everything we needed and our sons participated in sports (costly) and belonged to other groups. We were never in debt and never paid for a car on time. Our only debt was our mortgage and our house was paid off by the time we retired. Today, all of the homemaking skills are abandoned or purchased and debt abounds in the lives of most young people. Sad for me to see.

  5. #30
    Junior Member janjanq's Avatar
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    If I didn't piece quilts I might not have an iron either. I use my dryer as my iron. I have a steam function in my dryer and it does a pretty good job of getting the wrinkles out. (Of course since I've been retired my wardrobe consists mostly of t-shirts and jeans.) I also use spray wrinkle releaser.

  6. #31
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    to be fair...I have never churned butter...
    sandy[/QUOTE]

    True for me too...I never milked a cow and never sheared a sheep's wool and never cut wood with an axe. My nan and grandpa did that. I learned to iron, cook and bake and do household chores. With a big family everyone had to help. It was my job to do all the ironing. I hated it and still do. The younger generation have fewer kids and they have more conveniences to help with everyday chores so they don't learn the things that we needed to learn. The younger ones also have skills I will never learn. They are technically savvy whereas I can barely use a computer for e-mail and visiting quilting websites. Every generation has changes and new things bring new challenges.

  7. #32
    Junior Member janjanq's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by quilterpurpledog View Post
    I was a home economics teacher before becoming a full time homemaker when our family came along. I felt valued in every sense of the word. With facts and numbers I could show your that when you employ homemaking skills you probably don't need a second salary. We had everything we needed and our sons participated in sports (costly) and belonged to other groups. We were never in debt and never paid for a car on time. Our only debt was our mortgage and our house was paid off by the time we retired. Today, all of the homemaking skills are abandoned or purchased and debt abounds in the lives of most young people. Sad for me to see.
    When my daughters were In high school I was dismayed that home ec class no longer existed. To me that was one of the most important classes! I think both boys and girls should be required to take classes that teach topics like cooking, child care, money management, housekeeping, home repair, etc.

  8. #33
    Super Member fivepaws's Avatar
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    I believe it. The only time I use my iron is when I am quilting or ironing freezer paper together for templates. Haven't ironed in years. Thank goodness!!
    All my grand-children have paws.

  9. #34
    Super Member Wanabee Quiltin's Avatar
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    Things are different now. My grandsons came over once and I asked them to make their own sandwiches from the spread I put on the table. They didn't know how to do it. Ages 9 and 12 ! They are now 10 and 13 and have never made a bed or swept a floor, don't know much of anything household related. I don't think their mother owns an iron either. My husband came from a family of 4 boys and one girl. The boys lived at home until they were really old (my DH was 41 when he married). When wash and wear came out, his mother told the boys (really men at that time) that she wasn't ironing their clothes anymore. She ironed her clothes but gave up on all the boys clothes and that was about 40 years ago. So I think a lot of people don't use irons anymore for clothes. And then I have a friend who irons every single thing, including her husbands work jeans. Good Grief.

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by sandy l View Post
    It's a scary world they are inheriting.
    inheriting and creating more.....on a discussion panel on a tv show the topic was AI - artificial intelligence. The forecast for its use/expansion is a bit frightening.

    Of my two daughters, I have one that could survive on a mountaintop and the other who is too busy with her job to do mundane things, and therefore her two daughters are oblivious of the bare essentials of life......if it's not on the Internet or you can't order it on line, it's just not worth it! That's their philosophy......

  11. #36
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    I am 70 years old and when I was young I ironed people's clothes and other items for 10 cents per piece

  12. #37
    Super Member AZ Jane's Avatar
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    I was wearing a t-shirt one day and someone asked if it was new. Of course, I said no, had it for years, why?? Because it had those lines in it like new clothes. ???????? OH!! I actually fold my clothes!! LOL, the type, where you fold in the sides then twice in the center. Bahahahahahah
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    Better to do something imperfectly, than nothing perfectly.
    Done is better than perfect.

  13. #38
    Super Member Dodie's Avatar
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    I don't know why after all this time but it still amazes me what these kids do not know in this day and age as through a conversation one little girl said to me "what is a picnic" in another conversation with a church going mother a little boy ask "what is a hymn" it is so sad that this stuff is all going by the way side no woner there are so many mixed up kids out there.

  14. #39
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    It does make one wonder at how untrained young folks are today. They can work their electronic toys and computers, but cooking? What's that. Then there's sweeping, ironing, mowing the lawn, etc. Thankfully, my kids were taught life survival skills and they passed those on to my grandkids.

  15. #40
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    Janjaq: I am with you that Home Ec and shop should still be taught in schools. Also parenting classes, money management, etc. No one seems to think these skills are important any more, and then wonder why they are always in debt, etc. My daughter, who sews. frequently is "gifted" with expensive clothes that just need a tiny bit of sewing like hemming over long pants, sewing a button on, etc.

  16. #41
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    How sad! I learned to iron clothes at a very young age. I still iron my blouses and all my husbands shirts. I make them and are made of cotton. I think most people live in t-shirts so no ironing is necessary.

  17. #42
    Senior Member Cactus Stitchin's Avatar
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    When I was working my company had an agreement with a dry cleaners to pickup laundry and drop off cleaned and pressed clothing twice a week. There was a designated location to drop off your large blue duffle bag and pickup your finished laundry. In addition to dry cleaning, they also washed and pressed shirts and pants. You would be surprised how many people brought in all their outer garments to be cleaned and not just executives. I also remember one man who wouldn't drop off or pickup his own laundry. He had his assistant call his wife to come from home to do that chore.

    Also, many companies with large campuses, Nike comes to mind, have a dry cleaners/laundry business onsite so employees can drop-off and pickup the same day.

  18. #43
    Super Member cashs_mom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tuckyquilter View Post
    I'm no longer amazed at the lack of information the younger generation(s) have. IN ALL AREAS.
    I'm there with you. The house next door to me is for sale and I dread getting a pair of the little "snowflakes" that seem to be moving in this neighbor. OMG, the things they don't seem to understand that I have always considered common knowledge . . .
    Patrice S

  19. #44
    Senior Member sJens's Avatar
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    So believe this as my iron has never seen a shirt or pants. LOL I do have a friend that irons sheets and underclothes maybe she like them warmed up!

  20. #45
    Super Member jetayre's Avatar
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    I worked in a grocery store for ten years and the floors had to be done and the bathrooms. I had to show every kid that was hired how to sweep, mop, and clean!!! Boys AND girls. They didn't like to do bathrooms (neither do I) but it was part of the job. I was told they did not have to do that because it was their mother's job....I would ask what if their mother was sink or gone.....someone else would do it!!

  21. #46
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    A different generation. Sixty years ago we received an iron as wedding gift. Try doing that now !!!!!!!!!!

  22. #47
    Super Member redstilettos's Avatar
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    ROFL...that cracked me up!

  23. #48
    Super Member plainpat's Avatar
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    The old days were not always better to the people who lived them.My Dad's father left his
    Mom with a son & 4 DDs.There were no jobs for women,no baby sitters.She took in washing & ironing.

    Dad,being the oldest at 8 yrs,picked up & delivered clean,ironed clothes with a wagon.He found a job at 13, delivering big chunks of ice on his shoulder.The money helped his Mom raise her family,with never a penny of support from their Dad.

    He often helped with ironing & did his own shirts all his life.

    I try to catch myself from mentioning how good things used to be.It's all relative.JMO
    Pat

  24. #49
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    Thank Heavens for no iron fabric. I had to starch and iron DHs National Guard uniforms. I sure envied wives who sent them to the cleaners but it was money we didn't have. I took my sewing machine to our DIL's house so I could shorten some curtains and I asked her to find her ironing board and iron. She had to think awhile to remember where it was stored. 😧

  25. #50
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    This a true story.
    A good quilter friend of mine was flying back from Tampa last week and sat by a young woman on the plane who had just graduated with a degree in fashion design and something else tagged on to the name of the degree. In making conversation my friend told the young woman that she had graduated with a Home Economics degree and was a quilter and an heirloom garment maker. The young lady proceeded to tell her that that degree was not needed in modern times because all that stuff could be learned on You Tube.

    And I can testify to the fact that these young women practice their art of so called "homemaking" like they indeed learned it on You Tube too. Friends this is really sad. If they had an iron they could not use it.

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