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Thread: I couldn't believe this.

  1. #51
    Super Member madamekelly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Onebyone View Post
    Same sadness as the neighbor boy some years ago who came to my house and I was taking cookies out of the oven. He was flabbergasted that cookies could be made at home. He had no idea. His mother laughed and said her oven hadn't been turned on in years. The family moved and I don't know if the youngster ever go home baked cookies again.
    I had the same experience once when taking bread out of the oven. Neighbor girl said "I did not know you could make bread." Lol.
    If you always do, what you have always done, The results never change. Change is the wings you give yourself.

  2. #52
    Super Member Chasing Hawk's Avatar
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    I cook from scratch whenever possible. Usually 95% of the time vs. packaged or take out food. The grand kids are amazed when I bake and it's not a mix out of the box. I made a cheesecake this past weekend, out came the stand mixer, measuring cups and spoons as well as the food processor. My grand daughter looks at it all and says....."all that for a cake?" I chuckled and went on to explain that this is better and alot more fun that opening a box.
    Everyone is born right handed, only the gifted overcome it.
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  3. #53
    Super Member cashs_mom's Avatar
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    I don't think anyone said the *old days* were better. I just heard people expressing that it was a shame that people didn't teach children basic living skills now. And women were still ironing after they started working as far as I know. I don't think everyone quit ironing in the 50's.
    Patrice S

  4. #54
    Super Member cashs_mom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by trolleystation View Post
    A different generation. Sixty years ago we received an iron as wedding gift. Try doing that now !!!!!!!!!!
    I may actually do that for the next wedding I'm invited to! Let them figure it out.
    Patrice S

  5. #55
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    well at least I can say my daughter has an iron and my GKs know what an iron is....she just doesn't use it and they don't know what it's used for....(ok...ok...ok...maybe a slight exaggeration)!

  6. #56
    Super Member Onebyone's Avatar
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    to be fair...I have never churned butter...
    ..I never milked a cow and never sheared a sheep's wool and never cut wood with an axe.
    But the difference is you know what a churn does, and you know where milk come from and that sheep have to be sheared. Probably before age 12 too.
    I love my life!

  7. #57
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    HA! You reminded me of when I was 14 and ironing in the living room while watching TV and waiting for a phone call from my boyfriend.. Phone rang and of course I answered the iron. Bright red cheek for a while, so glad it didn't blister. After than, the phone stayed on the end table. (This was back in the days before cell phones, of course).

  8. #58
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    I remember as a little girl, mom always made homemade noodles. Once when a neighbor lady was over, she was absolutely flabergasted that my mom could "make" noodles. She always thought they grew on trees, were picked and dehydrated and placed in plastic bags for sale. And THIS was in the 50's.

  9. #59
    Super Member cashs_mom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Onebyone View Post
    But the difference is you know what a churn does, and you know where milk come from and that sheep have to be sheared. Probably before age 12 too.
    That's exactly it Onebyone. I never milked cows or dressed chickens like my mother did on the farm but I know what it is and I know that people did it. It just seems like there's an awful lot of knowledge that isn't passed down anymore. Remember, those who don't know the mistakes of history are destined to repeat them. Pass your knowledge on. Even if it's just what an iron does.
    Patrice S

  10. #60
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    So many of the young people are so clueless about things we take for granted. They know technology we may have a problem with but I see what schools are NOT teaching kids today and think things really need to change, back as they used to be and (like history classes, reg. math etc) and kids would be better educated, and many parents are just as clueless, as this has gone on for a long time. Years (early 70's)ago had a student at a costly university come into our gas station and ask how much air they should put in their tires, they were going 150 miles home. I personally prefer common sense and parents that teach that to their kids.

  11. #61
    Super Member cashs_mom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carol34446 View Post
    So many of the young people are so clueless about things we take for granted. They know technology we may have a problem with but I see what schools are NOT teaching kids today and think things really need to change, back as they used to be and (like history classes, reg. math etc) and kids would be better educated, and many parents are just as clueless, as this has gone on for a long time. Years (early 70's)ago had a student at a costly university come into our gas station and ask how much air they should put in their tires, they were going 150 miles home. I personally prefer common sense and parents that teach that to their kids.
    Well said, Carol
    Patrice S

  12. #62
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    I'll never forget the time I was about 12 years old, and went in to a fast food restaurant with my mom and dad. (Both had been raised on farms. My dad milked cows, my mom tended sheep.)


    This was well before you could order vegetarian food and have people understand "no meat." My mom said she wanted a cheeseburger without the burger.

    The cashier (maybe 16 years old) said they couldn't make it that way. (Clearly, because they never HAD, the girl assumed it was impossible.) Never wanting to leave a person in their ignorance if she has a teaching moment, my mother seized the opportunity. (Mind you, a lunch crowd was forming behind us.)

    Mama said, "Where does cheese come from?"

    The girl : "I don't know. The store?''

    Mama: "I mean, before the store, do you know where it comes from?"

    Girl: No....?

    Mama: It comes from a cow.

    With a puzzled look, and I kid you not, the cashier asked, "Really? How do they get the cheese out of the cow?"

    I don't know when I had ever heard my mother cackle so hard in public as that moment. Even my dignified daddy couldn't contain his laughter. He told me later he pictured squeezing Velveeta out of ole Bessie.
    Last edited by zozee; 03-22-2017 at 10:41 PM.

  13. #63
    Senior Member mtkoldra's Avatar
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    my neighbor's grandson came over to my yard and seeing cloths hanging on the line he asked, what are they? I said that I am drying my laundry and he said 'duh, it is 2016 and you still are drying laundry outside?
    I thought, poor kid, he has never smelled sheets fresh from the line. Not important thing, but what a pleasure!

  14. #64
    Super Member quiltingshorttimer's Avatar
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    someone said something about kids not learning lots of basic skills. While I wholeheartedly agree that some kids don't get exposed to much--either because their families are so wealthy that they hire everything done, or so poor that there is true depravity of experience. I was an educator for 34 years and saw both! I live in a rural community(but worked in the suburbs) and we are in the country. I do think that many kids in that environment do get exposed to the kinds of chores we are talking about--my kids know how to drive a tractor, a stick shift, attach a trailer and load it (distribution of weight, etc); split wood, tend a fire (we sometimes lose power for days on end), dig holes, handle horses, cows, chickens, change a tire (we are on gravel so when it's graded we can count on at least one flat--my kids used to time their tire changes like a pit crew when they were in school!). My son started doing his own laundry when my daughter was learning in prep for college, both cook, clean (although that is debatable!), paint, my son welds, does construction (he and I built a shed/coop when he was in 9th grade), etc.

    I worked with families that would not let their kids do any of these things--worried that the neighbors would think they were too poor to afford help! And then on the other end of the spectrum, those that simple did not have to opportunity to do any of those things.

    Good parents raise self-reliant kids--but the definition of what's needed to be self-reliant has changed. That's both good and bad!

  15. #65
    Super Member cashs_mom's Avatar
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    I was talking to a lady I know today and this subject came up. She said her granddaughter was taking Home Ec and learning to *cook*. The school's idea of teaching them to cook was teaching them to use a microwave. I shudder to think what they would do if they were teaching them to sew.
    Last edited by cashs_mom; 03-23-2017 at 07:14 PM.
    Patrice S

  16. #66
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    Things are different these days. Even though my daughter grew up with an iron she hated using one and still will say she doesn't know how. She had to get used to them when she started quilting, even though she's only done a few block quilts I have gotten the importance of ironing in her. Two weeks ago my iron died, I had picked up my grandkids and told them we had to go to Walmarts because I needed to sew and couldn't because my iron was broken. They didn't ask any questions, they know by being around me enough.
    Judy

  17. #67
    Super Member cashs_mom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by romanojg View Post
    Things are different these days. Even though my daughter grew up with an iron she hated using one and still will say she doesn't know how. She had to get used to them when she started quilting, even though she's only done a few block quilts I have gotten the importance of ironing in her. Two weeks ago my iron died, I had picked up my grandkids and told them we had to go to Walmarts because I needed to sew and couldn't because my iron was broken. They didn't ask any questions, they know by being around me enough.
    Well, good for them!
    Patrice S

  18. #68
    Senior Member roguequilter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Teddybear Lady View Post
    I must admit, my iron only gets used for my quilting. I use my dryer to fluff out wrinkles on our clothes. I will occasionally press wrinkles out of clothes if the dryer can't do it. haha
    pretty much what i do too. once in a while i have to iron one of hubbys longsleeved work shirts because the sleeves twist up in dryer. but i told my son i was going to buy a small iron to keep at his place dor when i'm there sewing with the grands. he said "great! i've got a couple of shirts i'd like to iron too!" so then i asked him what he used as a iron surface ..he said a bathtowel on his dryer (borrows girlfiends' iron). very small apartment, no room to store board. so ..for christmas i got him one of those ironing pads with magnetic corners to sit on top of dryer. you'd have thought i just bought him his first car!
    the rogue quilter - in from wandering in the sun and snow with camera in hand.

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