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Thread: Janome 6600 - - can I make this work?

  1. #1
    Super Member meyert's Avatar
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    Janome 6600 - - can I make this work?

    I have a Janome 6600 and I love it. The only problem that I have gotten into is that the bed is too big - - no arm sleeve room, or whatever it would be called. I was going to patch a pair jeans and I can't get into the leg of the jean to sew. Is there a way to do this with the Janome 6600? I am hoping that I am missing something. Do any of you guys know?

  2. #2
    Moderator kathy's Avatar
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    I always open the seam to get to the area to patch, much easier

  3. #3
    Super Member meyert's Avatar
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    Thank you for your reply .. and I did of that. But how would I sew the seam back up if the leg doesn't fit over the bed of my machine???? Maybe I am just thick headed???

  4. #4
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    i have the same machine & dont use the open arm that often, but when i need it....what i found works is when patching, i have to do it in stages in order to make sure there is nothing on the underside that i dont want included in the sewing...just try & 'squish' all the unwanted area away from the sewing foot...sew one seam, remove & reset the sewing area, then return to under the foot....and i use the smallest foot possible...not the walking foot as too much surface is needed to accommodate that foot...good luck

  5. #5
    Super Member meyert's Avatar
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    Thank you for your replies....I have tried "squishing" (technical term)... I got frustrated, gave up and picked up my sister's Singer.. this one will fit in the pant leg. I am going to give it a whirl after dinner.

  6. #6
    Super Member amyjo's Avatar
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    you would turn your pants leg inside out to sew the seam. I take the inside seam open and that makes it easier to have a patch put in so you don't sew any unwanted parts together.

  7. #7
    Super Member DogHouseMom's Avatar
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    In short ... no. The 6600 while a great machine, is not a dress-makers machine and therefore not great for small circular pieces (like cuffs). The base of the Janome is solid steel.
    May your stitches always be straight, your seams always lie flat, and your grain never be biased against you.

    Sue

  8. #8
    Junior Member
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    You are looking for a free arm machine with removable base. The Janome 6600 is not one of those machines.

  9. #9
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    Good idea borrowing your sister's, saved a lot of frustration......best thing companies did was design the free arm.....

  10. #10
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    A free arm machine really doesn't help with the long vertical seam on pants....it does for "round" sewing like cuffs, hems, but I do hems on my 6600 anyway. For jeans and pants, I open the inside seam to do patches, then turn inside out and seam it back. Then hem on the machine.

  11. #11
    Super Member purplefiend's Avatar
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    I learned to sew on a flat bed machine, wasn't a quilter back then. I didn't have a free arm machine until I bought my Bernina 1031 in 1992. There are some things that cannot be sewn using the free arm, like cuffs and sleeves on baby clothes; they're too tiny.
    You need to find a sewing instruction manual from the 1950s and earlier to learn stuff like that.

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