Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: Live chickens and wool batting

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    9

    Live chickens and wool batting

    I am a beginner / intermediate quilter. I just finished a quilt with wool batting. Wool is expensive and I hate to toss unusable in the trash. I was wondering if chickens would use it in their nests for winter. My friend has a few chickens and thinks if there were any chemical's in the batting since the chickens walk around in chicken poop battings should not hurt them. Would chickens use this to line their nests? This has been a hot topic among us suburbia quilters. Thanks Judy

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Carolina
    Posts
    872
    I have chickens, and have never seen them make a nest. If I have straw in the nest box, they'll scratch it to make a dip to set in. They will scratch dirt to make a dip to set in. But they do not bring material into an area to build a nest. Some people I know save up tiny scraps to fill dog beds they make for shelters, perhaps this would be a more appropriate use for it.

  3. #3
    Super Member zozee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    9,021
    I'd think it would be good in pincushions and mug rugs.

  4. #4
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Chula Vista CA
    Posts
    6,731
    Chickens do nest but they are not gathers like birds that fly. And when I suggested about throwing some of my scraps out for birds I was told it was not a good thing to do by Rangers in Yosemite. Can't remember the exact reason but was told not to do it, so I don't anymore. I agree with Zozee, use it to make other smaller items. A friend of mine took my left over batting for purses.

  5. #5
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    8,929
    Quote Originally Posted by quiltingcandy View Post
    Chickens do nest but they are not gathers like birds that fly. And when I suggested about throwing some of my scraps out for birds I was told it was not a good thing to do by Rangers in Yosemite. Can't remember the exact reason but was told not to do it, so I don't anymore. I agree with Zozee, use it to make other smaller items. A friend of mine took my left over batting for purses.
    Re: thread/fab scraps for birds nests......a no- no because thread could wrap around fledglings legs, throat......and scraps of fabric do not dry as quickly as the dried foliage, grasses, twigs the birds naturally use, hence pneumonia.....
    That's what I understand.....

  6. #6
    Senior Member ibex94's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Brandon, MS
    Posts
    818
    Quote Originally Posted by Geri B View Post
    Re: thread/fab scraps for birds nests......a no- no because thread could wrap around fledglings legs, throat......and scraps of fabric do not dry as quickly as the dried foliage, grasses, twigs the birds naturally use, hence pneumonia.....
    That's what I understand.....
    First time I have heard this! I'll stop leaving my strings and threads outside for the birds. drat. I hope I haven't inadvertently caused a poor quality of life for the critters.

  7. #7
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Western Wisconsin
    Posts
    12,952
    Blog Entries
    1
    How large are the wool scraps? I was going to get rid of some batting scraps and then realized I could cut them down into 6.5" squares for a rag quilt cut with the Accuquilt rag quilt die. Wool batting would work well for this purpose.

    It's true that fabric scraps (and even cotton batting scraps) are not good for birds. They retain moisture too long compared to twigs and grasses, which means that baby birds develop pneumonia.

    I don't save really small scraps of batting and fabric anymore. Some people do collect them and, when they have enough, use them to stuff small pet beds. Some animal shelters will take that type of pet bed (call first, though, as shelters vary in what they want).

  8. #8
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    23,153
    Assuming your batting is needled (sort of like felt, but fluffier) you could sew the pieces together. Wool is a great filler for pot holders.

  9. #9
    Super Member Tiggersmom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    2,321
    Don't know about chickens but it would make fabulous pages in needle books.
    Jennifer: Organized in my dreams.
    🌷RIP dear Tigger....you are missed!
    Buddybear's Mom ...Yorkie Fur Baby

  10. #10
    Super Member zozee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    9,021
    If you don't want them,offer them for sale on this board. Someone will want them!

  11. #11
    Super Member quiltsRfun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    8,689
    Blog Entries
    1
    I sew together the larger pieces to use in baby quilts. Smaller ones I use for FMQ practice sandwiches, zipper pouches and other small items.

  12. #12
    Super Member Sandygirl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    4,872
    Until you have almost been hit in the face with a dead bird dangling by a thread or string wrapped hanging on a pine tree limb, wrapped around their little leg...you may not understand the "harm" of donating your scraps to the nest-building cause. No, i have not left scraps out for the birds but, yes, i was almost struck in the face by a that dead bird .
    I can only imagine the terror of a long and frightening predicament that poor bird suffered. Leave nature alone! They survive just fine without our percieved good deeds.

    Sandy
    Sandygirl

    Janome 9900 / Janome 9700 / Janome 3160 QVC/ Janome 1100D serger, Juki 2020 Mini
    Singer Centennial model (inherited from my late, fav aunt!)

  13. #13
    Super Member ILoveToQuilt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    New Hampshire & Maine
    Posts
    2,890
    I actually burn my snips and strings (cotton or wool only) in my wood stove. Leaves no icky residue (like polyester) and burns down to a fine ash. This has been okay'd by my chimney sweep (who actually took some home for his stove!) as being safe to do since I have a very basic stove. Just a thought...

    My chickens always roosted in pine shavings. They dig a hole and plunk themselves down into it. They had access to roosting boxes, but preferred the shavings. My gals always laid their eggs in these holes. Never used straw or any other medium but shavings for them. They free ranged during the day and only slept in the chicken house at night.

    So this was my 2 cents....
    Anita

    The only place that housework comes before quilting is in the dictionary.

  14. #14
    Super Member caspharm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Nevada
    Posts
    6,967
    Another option is pet beds. I put my smaller scraps of batting in my scrap bag, which I then sew up as a pet bed.

  15. #15
    Super Member IBQUILTIN's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    North Fork Ca
    Posts
    8,253
    It would not be a good idea if there is any chance that it could become damp or wet. You would not want your chickens nesting in something that could hold water the way that wool can.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.