Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 5 1 2 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 105

Thread: multi-cultural

  1. #1
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    19,397
    It is so educational/interesting/fun to see the posts from various countries - I don't always know what's being talked about, but I love it!

  2. #2
    Moderator littlehud's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    SW Iowa
    Posts
    32,958
    It is amazing to me how far reaching this board is.

  3. #3
    Power Poster Lacelady's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Ireland
    Posts
    12,323
    Blog Entries
    19
    I am two rolled into one. I am UK born, living in Ireland.

  4. #4
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Out searching for some sunshine :-)
    Posts
    59,092
    Blog Entries
    1
    I love it!!! I have learned so much about so many things, it is awesome 8) 8) 8)

  5. #5
    Super Member Barbm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    blink and you've missed it
    Posts
    2,612
    we get some awesome vacations through pics of their hometowns too! I love looking at them all!!!

  6. #6
    Power Poster Ninnie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Athens Ga
    Posts
    11,448
    I love the pictures fro all over the world! and the stories!

  7. #7
    Power Poster Lacelady's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Ireland
    Posts
    12,323
    Blog Entries
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by Barbm
    we get some awesome vacations through pics of their hometowns too! I love looking at them all!!!
    You want pics of my home town? Well, there isn't much of it, and it's fairly spread out, but here is one of our cathedral, our one claim to fame.

    This is Achonry Cathedral ( my village). It's said to be the smallest cathedral in Western Europe
    Name:  Attachment-38081.jpe
Views: 9
Size:  61.0 KB

  8. #8
    Super Member Pats8e8's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Hesperia, CA
    Posts
    1,058
    Wow, that is beautiful, you are lucky to live in such an historic town.

  9. #9
    Super Member Pats8e8's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Hesperia, CA
    Posts
    1,058
    What are the little bubbles?

  10. #10
    Power Poster Lacelady's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Ireland
    Posts
    12,323
    Blog Entries
    19
    It's not big enought to call a town - no shops, no pub, no post office, no bus service but one small school. I'm not sure of the population but probably in the low hundreds. BUT I do agree with you, it is beautiful, though when I get to the point that I can't drive a car, then I will probably have to move.

  11. #11
    Super Member quiltsRfun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    8,023
    Blog Entries
    1
    Yes, the posts are fun. And I like to see all the different quilting styles depending on the area of the world where the quilter is located. Anyone else notice that?

  12. #12
    Super Member Barbm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    blink and you've missed it
    Posts
    2,612
    lacelady- that's a pretty cathedral. Worth visiting. small towns have a uniqueness about them. show us more?

  13. #13
    sunnyhope's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Oslo, Norway
    Posts
    443
    well i guess most know i m from Norway now; if u check out my blog; look for the chinchilla bit and it will take you to my old site with chinchilla information but there is also a few pages with information about Norway along with a bunch of photos :wink:

  14. #14
    Banned
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    7,302
    Blog Entries
    1
    Ooooh Lacelady, I love the photo of your village! Mom and I have been wanting to take a trip to Ireland. And I LOVE the cemetery. As a genealogist, they are one of my favorite places. Mom teases me that on our last trip I found every small cemetery between Texas and Ohio! LOL

  15. #15
    BlueChicken's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Gone
    Posts
    2,411
    That's beautiful lacelady! :-)

    What always cracks me up is how different the English language can be from one country to another. And then again, how similar some things are.

  16. #16
    Super Member Barbm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    blink and you've missed it
    Posts
    2,612
    I agree blue! sometimes I'm afraid of using our "slang" as it differs within regions of the state. Don't want to offend anyone.


  17. #17
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    19,397
    or how much "slippage" there can be in any communication between two people

  18. #18
    Power Poster Mousie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    17,211
    Quote Originally Posted by BlueChicken
    That's beautiful lacelady! :-)

    What always cracks me up is how different the English language can be from one country to another. And then again, how similar some things are.
    For example: Blues feet go clackety-clack,
    Over here in the states, the trains go clackety clack. :lol:

  19. #19
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    19,397
    what we call grocery "carts" in Minnesota are called "buggies" in Florida

  20. #20
    Super Member kwhite's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    North East USA
    Posts
    5,048
    It took me a while when I moved to Pa to grasp the 'localisms" too. The first time DH wanted to "red up" I was furious. Told him he isn't painting anything in my house red. Then found out that means cleaning up. We had been married for 10 years and we moved here and his whole vocabulary changed over night.

  21. #21
    k3n
    k3n is offline
    Power Poster k3n's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Somerset, England
    Posts
    10,712
    Blog Entries
    1
    Well as most of you know, I'm English but live in France with a Dutchman - oh when cultures collide! What fun! DH and I have had many amusing and annoying moments. For eg, the Dutch are quite direct and at first I used to get mad if he'd ask 'why are you chopping carrots like that?' I felt it as a criticism - but that's just the way they ask things. Not a good example maybe but I don't know how else to explain it! And of course between England and America there are some classic howlers like for example a 'fag' to me is a cigarette but to you, I think it's something else! And the front of a car is bonnet and the back, boot - I think you say hood and trunk. And the grocery carts - we call trolleys! I once said to QNC 'cheers big ears' which is just English slang for thanks and she said 'what's with my ears?' LOL And Blue calls everyone 'dude' male and female - I love that! In Ireland, a group of people can be 'lads' ( even girls! I call everyone 'mate' even the dog and cat (!) which is very 'Hampshire' where I was brought up. Vive la difference, I say!

  22. #22
    BlueChicken's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Gone
    Posts
    2,411
    Quote Originally Posted by bearisgray
    what we call grocery "carts" in Minnesota are called "buggies" in Florida
    We call them trolleys here! :-)

  23. #23
    k3n
    k3n is offline
    Power Poster k3n's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Somerset, England
    Posts
    10,712
    Blog Entries
    1
    Thought of something else - this thread is so interesting! If someone comes to the house - friend or family - and helps clear dishes or puts the kettle on or whatever, I LOVE it - so helpful etc... But Hans hates it and sees it as interference/ criticism that WE should be doing that! THAT'S typical Dutch versus English. The key is communication - that's the only way. Now if he says or does something that I don't get I ask him to explain his motivation and vice versa. You wouldn't think there could be so much difference between two such close countries! Of course, some things are differences between us two as individuals, but there is a national characteristic.

    Here in France, I've heard French people say English people are rude, because they don't shake hands or kiss everytime they meet but that's just not NORMAL for us! We just go 'hiya' and that's enough. But the French are much more formal. If I pass the neighour's house and they're in the garden, it's not enough to say 'good morning' and walk on - I have to go in and give them a kiss on each cheek and the kids too. The kids got used very early on to everyone kissing them all the time - even strange old ladies in the supermarket! In the UK, I'd have probably told them to back off but here it's just normal! :D

  24. #24
    k3n
    k3n is offline
    Power Poster k3n's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Somerset, England
    Posts
    10,712
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by BlueChicken
    Quote Originally Posted by bearisgray
    what we call grocery "carts" in Minnesota are called "buggies" in Florida
    We call them trolleys here! :-)
    Blue, the way you 'talk' always seems more similar to me than the American ppl on here - you use a lot of the same slang expressions as I'm used to. If you weren't upside down, you could almost BE English! :D But I bet you've got a cute accent! D Do you say 'sheila' and 'cobber' and all that like the Aussies or have you got your own words?

  25. #25
    BlueChicken's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Gone
    Posts
    2,411
    Far out... I'm not a huggy kissy kinda person... I'd never leave my house if I lived in France! LOL

    Over here it's very common for men to call each other "mate", or "bro".

    I can't think of anything else offhand.

Page 1 of 5 1 2 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.