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Need or Want: Food Processor

Need or Want: Food Processor

Old 02-26-2014, 03:02 PM
  #51  
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As soon as I use my FP I wash it!
If you wait to wash it food sticks on it. If you wash it first the food will rinse right off no hassles.
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Old 02-26-2014, 03:09 PM
  #52  
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I have a Cuisinart Duet - one motor base and blender or food processor interchanges. I use the FP most for grating - cheese, cabbage for slaw, cranberries for sauce at Thanksgiving/Christmas, ect. cuts a lot of the work out. All of the puecfes are dishwasher safe, although I casefully wash the blades by hand. The blender is a really nice one too.

I bought it at Costco for $50 several years ago when my blender died.
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Old 02-26-2014, 04:08 PM
  #53  
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I got a basic cuisinart when models changed about 12 years ago. I got the outdated model. Works great. I don't use it on a regular basis but like having it when I need it. I also use it to make powdered laundry detergent. It is just soap and washes off.
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Old 02-26-2014, 04:13 PM
  #54  
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Haven't used my FP daily but I do like mine. Love everyone's comments on here so far.

Thanks BDawn for your tip for easy cleaning on FP.

PS: I have made bread in my Kitchen Aid mixer and my FP until I got my breadmaker. I throw the dry ingredients in, make an indent for the yeast, pour liquids around the outside edge of dry ingredients, plug it in, set it on the dough setting and press start! An hour and a half later I take the risen dough out, punch it down, shape it, let it rise again and turn the oven on. Nothing simpler INHO.

Last edited by SewExtremeSeams; 02-26-2014 at 04:21 PM.
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Old 02-26-2014, 05:03 PM
  #55  
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Well I use mine for making scalloped potatoes, hummus, onions, cheese shredded and the like. I have 2, a 9 cup and 11 cup. I found the 11 cup at Goodwill for 5$ it needed a new lid. I ordered it for 45$ from the manufacturer. The unit was 225.00 new. When I do hummus every other week , the 11 cup is the best. Depends what you eat and cook. When I buy onions and on the ball I shred all of them and freeze them in small batches. Saves time when I am working 40 to 60 hour weeks.
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Old 02-26-2014, 06:46 PM
  #56  
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Originally Posted by callen View Post
I respect the opinions on this board so much that I need your help. For those who have a food processor - what are your main uses for it? Is it one of those appliances that will sit on the counter just for looks or am I just missing the needs vs wants for one? I would appreciate your input on this issue - obviously not an earth shattering decision but have very mixed opinions on this appliance. Also, what brand do you like best? I am leaning towards a Cuisinart 9 cup model because I have read several negative reviews on KitchenAid small appliances. I thank you so much for your help.
I had a cuisine-art years ago and loved it. I did make pizza dough in it but mine was not large enough to do bread dough. I used it practically nonstop in the summer when I was preparing vegetables from the garden. The motor was still going strong by the time I had worn out the bowls and blades. Wish I still had it.
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Old 02-26-2014, 07:51 PM
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I have & use 3, small one for chopping nuts, onions, & any small quantities, medium for slicing, chopping, mostly vegetables, large because I can garden produce and salsa in summer. Makes short work when I can 50 or 60 quarts of salsa or stewed tomatoes each year. Not worth the clean up to use large or medium for small jobs, takes too long & too hard on medium size to use for canning so what size depends on what you're going to use it for. The inexpensive ones last just as long as the higher priced ones as long as you use it for what it's intended cause it's the blades that get dull and plastic pieces that wear out or crack first. One usually lasts about 5 years or so for me & by that time they've come out with a better model anyway. Only 2 seniors in this household, one with diabetes so food production and diet have a high priority.
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Old 02-26-2014, 09:11 PM
  #58  
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I have the cusinart mini from hsn. I am gluten and soy sensitive and use it constantly to make rice flour. cornmeal and other stuff.
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Old 02-26-2014, 09:19 PM
  #59  
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I have used food processors for more than 30 years and would really miss it. The first was a Braun that I got with S&H Green Stamps when we lived in Florida, and after more than 25 years a part broke and could not be replaced. I bought a Kitchenaid and the handle broke after only about a year, guaranteeing that I will never again buy that brand of anything! I got another Braun and I'm happy with it.

I use it several times a week, and sometimes several times in a day, especially around the holidays. It saves time, and the parts go into the dishwasher, so there's no complaint about clean-up.

Let's see how many things I can think of that I do:

Mixing the wet ingredients for banana bread.
Making hummus and other dips.
Making a strawberry health shake (1 cup buttermilk, 2 cups frozen berries, a bit of Splenda).
Pumpkin shake (vanilla ice cream, pumpkin pie spice, canned pumpkin)
Orange or chocolate buttercream frosting. Some other flavors come out tasting a little raw, but those two are great.
Pureeing all sorts of things.
Mine has a juice reamer, which I don't often use because there are just the 2 of us, but if I wanted a lot of juice, that would be good.
Pie crust. Don't over mix it!
Grating carrots.
Grating cheese.
Slicing potatoes for scalloped potatoes.
Chopping nuts or almost anything else that needs chopping or mincing.
Chicken salad (or beef or ham salad)
Quick bean soup: Puree a can of beans and cook it with another can of beans left whole plus whatever other ingredients your recipe calls for. It gives the soup a great texture in a hurry.
Before I had my bread machine, I used the food processor to "knead" yeast dough, and it works pretty well. I would recommend looking for a recipe that's tailored to that method because there is limited capacity. I don't remember what recipe I used.
Oddly, I don't usually use it for deviled eggs because I usually only make a few and find it easier to drop the yolks and other ingrds. into a Seal-a-meal bag, work them around by hand and then cut a corner off to fill the eggs - less mess.

I can't think of any others off the bat, but you get the idea. I would rank it right up there with the microwave among things I appreciate in the kitchen. At first you will tend to follow your old habits and tend to forget about it, but if you remind yourself to consider whether something could be simplified with this machine, you will be surprised how often it could. It's best to have it out where you won't have to do too much digging around to get at it. Read the manual and start by using recipes in it first to familiarize yourself. Have fun.
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Old 02-26-2014, 09:28 PM
  #60  
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I have the Kitchenaid 12 cup food processor. I use it with a slicing disc to slice potatoes for many recipes, Au Gratin, Fried Potatoes, Potatoes Galette. I also use it to make Coleslaw, and Salsa (try Ree Drummond, the Pioneer Woman's recipe..yummy). I also use it to make sauces and salad dressings. If you do a lot of cooking from scratch you might want to buy one. I like the Kitchenaid, but I am not impressed by the manual.
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