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Thread: Would you... theoretically speaking?

  1. #1
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    Would you... theoretically speaking?

    Just a quick question ...
    I'm in the process of writing a modern quilting project for 4-Hers (9-21). One of the topics is where to get the fabric the members use. At the price of fabric it would be a pretty expensive project to run - asking families to buy fabric and cutters and rulers etc.
    I had thought of asking quilters in the area to donate their "What was I Thinking" /over-stash fabric (as well as encouraging the kids to pickup cotton shirts etc at thrift stores).
    I mentioned it to the quilters in my circle and got positive responses except for one lady. Her thought was "Why do they want our cast-off? If I don't want it why would they?"
    I'm one of those there is no ugly fabric, you just haven't cut it small enough quilters. I work with lots of fabric that have been donated to me and it is surprising what appeals to someone else or how different settings change the appeal of "ugly".
    Your thoughts?
    GrannyLady - Having too much fun dressing my grandaughters.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Panchita's Avatar
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    One man's trash is another man's treasure?

    Maybe ask for donations and then see what you get... Some fabric may be unsuitable for many reasons (too old, wrong weight, really, truly ugly) but some (hopefully most!) may be fine.

    Perhaps if you don't advertise it as the 'ugly fabric throw out', but rather 'donations for a 4H project' the objector may no longer object?
    Quilting is my vice



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  3. #3
    Super Member OhCanada's Avatar
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    I think it is a good idea. Just because I may not like a particular fabric doesn't mean it won't appeal to others.
    Valerie

  4. #4
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    I would go with your suggestions of where to get fabric as there are a lot of kids whose families just don't have the money to buy it in their budget. It would also teach the kids that being thrifty and recycling is a good thing that can have awesome results.
    Fabric is like money, no matter how much you have it's never enough.

  5. #5
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    I see nothing wrong with your suggestions. As someone else mentioned 'another man's trash...'. And how many threads just on this board have there been about 'well, I bought this tool and I really don't like it'. I'm sure there are plenty of generous folks out there more than willing to help out your students. Good luck with the program.

  6. #6
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    Speaking as a former Extension Office Secretary (this was the office that ran the 4-H program in SD) if they go to the thrift shop and buy shirts or use what was I thinking fabric they could probably use it in another project under recycling.
    As I have grown older, I've learned that pleasing everyone is impossible, but pissing everyone off is a piece of cake.

  7. #7
    Super Member Jeanne S's Avatar
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    I like your idea. It would be really helpful for the families with limited resources. You could give them the option of bringing their own fabric if they want, and this would cover those that didn't like your collections or had access to other fabric they like better. It is just for learning projects anyway, probably won't be family heirlooms. Encouraging recycling is always a great idea too.

  8. #8
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    I think you have an opportunity to teach 2 things w this project. 1) the obvious....the sewing project, and 2) have them keep a record of their materials and costs. Then discuss expenses and cost-cutting ideas, etc. (this could include borrowing tools as opposed to buying them, sharing tools, the source of the fabric..gifted , thrift store, WalMart, LQS.)
    Many young people don't get this sort of experience at home or school.

  9. #9
    Power Poster ManiacQuilter2's Avatar
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    Who can afford to buy over $100 in supplies when first starting to quilt? When I started, I took hand me downs. These are still difficult financial times. I would ignore that woman. I make most of my charity quilts from donations.
    A Good Friend, like an old quilt, is both a Treasure and a Comfort

  10. #10
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    I would go with Bonnie Hunter projects and use clothing. They are kids and nearly everyone has old clothes. Then the rotary cutters, mats and rulers could be shared. The only personal expense would be batting, thread, backing (unless you went with old sheets). If you purchase batting by the roll while on sale at J's, it is pretty low cost per foot.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by toverly View Post
    I would go with Bonnie Hunter projects and use clothing. They are kids and nearly everyone has old clothes. Then the rotary cutters, mats and rulers could be shared. The only personal expense would be batting, thread, backing (unless you went with old sheets). If you purchase batting by the roll while on sale at J's, it is pretty low cost per foot.
    Our mission sewing group has been using (second hand from thrift stores)mattress pads for batting.

  12. #12
    Super Member roguequilter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SuzzyQ View Post
    I mentioned it to the quilters in my circle and got positive responses except for one lady. Her thought was "Why do they want our cast-off? If I don't want it why would they?"
    I'm one of those there is no ugly fabric, you just haven't cut it small enough quilters. I work with lots of fabric that have been donated to me and it is surprising what appeals to someone else or how different settings change the appeal of "ugly".
    Your thoughts?
    i would have responded to that member .....cast-offs are treasures! i was a member of a row robin last year. every row i did, even the row for my own quilt, was done with fabrics i've recieved as cast-offs. my mil church quilter group sends me their scraps and don't wants. every row i made in the rr was exclaimed over & loved. i recently have started my grad daughters, at their requests, sewing quilt blocks & one finsihed a doll quilt. all made w cast-off fabrics. they loved all the different varieries of colors, shapes, subject matter. one girl has fallen i love w concept of fussy cutting and some children fabric that i find hideous is a tresure to her for her fussy cutting adventures. i recently was gifted four large garbage bags of beautiful & not so beautiful (to my eyes ) fabrics, new & some very old (36" wide) ..most has found home in my stash and growing stash of fabric collection i am making for the grand treasures according to the tastes in colors & prints they've shown to be to their liking, and to a couple of quilting friends whose taste in colors and prints differ from mine. my point is, of course others would want your cast-offs!! especially those starting out on this quilting adventure & those with tastes that differ from our own. and when it comes to recycled thrift store clothing ...i started with that as my main fabric source, and continue to hunt the thrift stores for plaid shirts, mens white dress shirts for special projects. good stuff!!
    the rogue quilter - in from wandering in the sun and snow with camera in hand.

  13. #13
    Super Member Neesie's Avatar
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    Not all "what was I thinking?" fabric is ugly. Sometimes it simply doesn't go with anything else, one has.
    Neesie


    By all means let's be open-minded, but not so open-minded that our brains drop out.
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  14. #14
    Super Member Tiggersmom's Avatar
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    ignore the one woman. Your idea is great and maybe those that want to help will "loan" some of their extra quilting supplies in case this is a one time project the families are not out tons of money for rulers etc.
    Jennifer: Organized in my dreams.
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  15. #15
    Super Member ILoveToQuilt's Avatar
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    Love the idea of donations. There is no such thing as "ugly" fabric in my world, just haven't found the right project for it yet. I would also list the options for buying fabric (Walmart, Hobby Lobby, Hancock's, JoAnn and the LQS) in your area.

    Enjoy your project! The 4-H kids are great and they come up with some awesome things. I've seen some of their quilts and garments at local fairs and I am blown away by them.
    Anita

    The only place that housework comes before quilting is in the dictionary.

  16. #16
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    It is possible that some of the donated stuff might be unusable for what you have in mind - but it is also likely that a lot of it will be usable.

  17. #17
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    Theoretically, yes! I already give fabrics that i've figured out I won't be able to use up before I die to groups. It's just sitting on a shelf, taking up space otherwise. If someone can get some use out of it, why not?
    A quilt is like a good life. It's full of mistakes, but, in the end, it looks pretty good.

  18. #18
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    Maybe they might also have some old rulers, cutters, thread they didn't like, etc. that could be donated and used. Wouldn't hurt to ask.

  19. #19
    Super Member sparkys_mom's Avatar
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    I just filled a big bag with fabric that I know I will never use. There is nothing wrong with it but I bought it when I was first starting out and my tastes have changed a lot. I was making lots of charity quilts for kids and in a more traditional way. I still make them but they are modern now and more solids and modern fabrics so no point in having them take up shelf space. The fabric will go to a group that makes lots of quilts for hospitals, hospice, etc. And yesterday, I just gave a friend a large self healing cutting mat that I no longer need. By all means, recycle!!
    Pat

  20. #20
    Super Member barri1's Avatar
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    I like all your ideas.. I have used scraps from board members, and have bought shirts from thrift stores, and have made a bunch of scrap quilts not using patterns, and you are right that the fabric can turn from ugly to nice by cutting the pieces small.. I made five quilts for my staff, and two of my nieces using scraps, and and odd pieces, and everyone has gotten compliments on them.. I made 6.5" squares, and needed a template. Chain stitched the pieces as I went, so saved on thread, and it was just too easy to not do it..

  21. #21
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    If YOU don't teach these kids how to think "outside of the box", who will. When my DD was a toddler, I found myself on my own. Friends wanted to help so I was given a lot of things (and some of this was far from my taste), I was given a bed covering that I didn't have a use for. We had snow that year and my DD wanted to play outside, I didn't have a snow suite for her. But I had an overall pants pattern for a little one, and this print quilted bed thing (it was not home made). So I washed it and then pulled out the pattern and started cutting. Using my sewing stash I made a snow suite for a toddler from flannel and the bed cover. This outfit was very cute and I had people always asking "Ware did you get that outfit"? I made a couple more using different flannel to help change them up. I tried to teach my DD, that you can ALWAYS find a treasure if you look. Don't let the people stop you from helping these kids, because the kids will remember what you are taking the time to teach them for a life time.

  22. #22
    Super Member jbj137's Avatar
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    ***
    *** Go after the fabric any way you can.
    ***
    *** The kids will love it because they made it.
    ***
    *** Look out quilters, here comes another crop of future quilters.
    ***
    J J (jbj137)

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    G = girl R =raised I = in T = the S = South

  23. #23
    Senior Member sandybeach's Avatar
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    Why not approach your local Quilt Guild? Ours has "tons" of donated fabric and batting. Plus they have a stitch-in on one Saturday a month. Ask if perhaps on one of these stitch-in days there might be ladies that would volunteer their time and supplies to each help one of the 4-H kids with their project. That way they do not have to spend any money and can still complete the task.

  24. #24
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    You might contact a quilting store or Joann's, since it is for 4-H they may donate some end pieces or sale fabric, as for rulers, cutters and other supplies the kids themselves might know someone that quilts that has extra or old cutting mats that can be used on the back side. Teach them how to make their own templets from something recycled is a way to save money. Learning thrift at an early age is a life lesson.
    I think you have a fantastic idea.

  25. #25
    Super Member Wanabee Quiltin's Avatar
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    I think asking others for fabric is a great idea. Once I went to a yard sale and there was some really bright fabric for sale quite cheaply. My DGD was with me and loved the fabric. When I bought it, the two ladies asked me what in the world I would ever use it for, in their opinion, it was not worth anything. But my granddaughter loved it, so what I think and what others think are two different things. Go ahead and ask, if you lived closer to me, I'd donate.

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