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Thread: Another dilemma in taking classes

  1. #51
    Senior Member Patti25314's Avatar
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    I meant that to be Both sides of the smack up the side of the head!

  2. #52
    Super Member Lyncat's Avatar
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    This reminds me of first grade. When it was finally my turn to read aloud, I was reading way ahead in the back of the Dick and Jane reader and never knew what page I was supposed to be on. I've never been too great in sewing classes. I learn what I think is useful to me and tend to do my own thing or don't work on my own project and go around helping others. Oh well, it's still fun to hang out with everyone.

  3. #53
    Senior Member captlynhall's Avatar
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    I have only taken one class and had so much fun. Our teacher was really good, and supportive, but honest in a diplomatic way. I would hate for one bad experience to taint any ones attitude to taking live classes. I do so enjoy the tutorials on Missouri Star Quilt Co. and use their information regularly, but the time spent with other quilters, new and somewhat experienced, was worth every penny. I can't wait to take another.
    When a dying man asked his pastor "How long does it take to die?" his pastor's heartfelt reply was "A lifetime." Live life to the fullest, but stop now and then to enjoy the sunset.
    Lynda

  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by teddysmom View Post
    I'm always a little skeptical about taking classes for the reasons mentioned. I find "googling" will give me videos, etc that I can watch at my own pace and usually accomplish what I needed.
    Amen. Luckily I have a small quilt guild and another group that just gets together and sews that aren't like that. The others I avoid like the plague unless I really want to learn what is being taught. But I always have a prepared reason for leaving early if necessary cuz as some one else said more politely when I've had enough I'm out of there. I'm German and I'm old, that's my excuse and I'm stickin to it!
    Cheryl Robinson
    http://www.silverneedlestitching.com
    APQS Millenium Longarm with Intelliquilter

  5. #55
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    basically, i would have asked the teacher to step out and told her that sarcastic remarks makes for an environment that is not condusive to learning and afterall.. isn't that what this is all about? awful, some people are talented, but not teachers.
    <^..^> Jyll <^..^>

  6. #56
    Super Member Dolphyngyrl's Avatar
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    Thats kind of a bummer, all my classes and teachers are great. I would say to those who have had a bad experience don't give up. I would like someone said to just avoid that group for classes, go to a different shop or teacher

  7. #57
    Senior Member ctipton's Avatar
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    I have bad luck with classes,,, Do like the apology though liz I'll have to remember That ...Actually I think I remembered that at a class and was not invited back for the next class.. MY BAD

  8. #58
    Super Member quiltmom04's Avatar
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    As a teacher, it IS hard to find a good balance of what everyone knows. Sometimes quilters take a class just to socialize, and they really don't NEED instruction. Others are such beginners, I've had to help them thread the machine! It makes teaching the class very difficult, because what ends up happening is that you seem to have to teach an indivudual class for each student as they progress to the next step. I don't want to bore students to death, but also don't want to leave others behind. I've taken classes, too where I am much faster than the rest of the class, and it does makes it frustrating. Sometimes, in that instance, i will work on several of the class project at one time so i can keep working, and not just waiting. As my skills have gotten better over the years, I find I don't take nearly so many classes because there ARE a lot of things I can figure out on my own.

  9. #59
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    I much prefer taking classes through Craftsy for quilting and sewing. I find they are worth the $ ( I buy them when they are having a sale). I can go at my own speed and have it repeated when and if I want to. I can go ahead if I don't need that area of teaching. Plus no one bugs me if I don't do it their way or if I put a different spin on things.
    They are available if I need them. it just works for me and the way that I learn.

  10. #60
    Senior Member pdcakm's Avatar
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    have had both kinds of instructors mentioned, ie: can't deal with behinders or aheaders. also, have had many instructors who recognized the different levels and were able to help everyone. different people with different skills. regardless of the instructor i just try to keep a positive attitude, get as much as i can from them, then go home with a new project.
    just took a class from anelie belden on her thoroughly modern dresden. great instructor, great project. she gave group instruction, worked closely with each of us at our own level. for those who got each task done early she would come by and give additional instructions. for those who were struggling she would come to them and give additional help. love my new dresden plate table topper and plan to do more.
    hope you find an instructor you enjoy. keep trying as there is lots to learn out there.
    pdcakm alias pat
    If things go wrong, don't go with them. ~Roger Babson

  11. #61
    Super Member Pat G's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pdcakm View Post
    have had both kinds of instructors mentioned, ie: can't deal with behinders or aheaders. also, have had many instructors who recognized the different levels and were able to help everyone. different people with different skills. regardless of the instructor i just try to keep a positive attitude, get as much as i can from them, then go home with a new project.
    just took a class from anelie belden on her thoroughly modern dresden. great instructor, great project. she gave group instruction, worked closely with each of us at our own level. for those who got each task done early she would come by and give additional instructions. for those who were struggling she would come to them and give additional help. love my new dresden plate table topper and plan to do more.
    hope you find an instructor you enjoy. keep trying as there is lots to learn out there.
    I so agree with how you handle these classes. I do the same by just sitting quietly working on my project leaving the instr. free for the ones who need more help. I will ask if I really get stuck though. As others have said, I rarely take classes anymore since I've figured out how to do most things & watch lots of online videos.
    It's all for fun anyway so why ruffle anybody's feathers over it.

    I once taught crafts for a whole season in Ariz. We had a "mentally challenged" woman who was the first to sign up for every class for the following wk. She didn't care what it was but always came prepared. She'd demand my full attention if I let her but soon learned how to manage her which usually meant passing her on to another student. She was so enthusiastic we didn't want to discourage her.. But the biggest prob. was that she'd turn up at my front door sev. times during the wk.
    Her sewing was gluing parts to her base since nobody would let her use a sewing mach.

  12. #62
    Super Member 4EVERquilt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by teddysmom View Post
    I'm always a little skeptical about taking classes for the reasons mentioned. I find "googling" will give me videos, etc that I can watch at my own pace and usually accomplish what I needed.
    I'm with you teddysmom, only because I took a free-motion quilting class one time and it was very expensive. Not only was the instructor condesending, but would not help out when needed. So.... now I watch videos and this way if you forget something you can always go back and look at it again and catch up. I use alot of books too.
    will quilt 4EVER

  13. #63
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    I'm not the type to take many classes- can't afford to, and too many Quilt Police. I took one several years ago on machine quilting at the LQS. The instructor was rude. She spent more time showing off her small quilts and discussing her fee structure than actually teaching, and her quilting wasn't too terrific when seen up close. Almost an hour was wasted showing people how to thread their many different machines and looking in the manuals for how to adjust the tension- something the participants should have known before class. She disparaged my Brother machine as an inexpensive beginner model (60 stitches CS6000i), as everyone else had Janomes and Berninas. Some folks thought she was just being cute- definitely not. Got a few good tips, but Never took a class there or with her again. The instructor sets the tone for the class.
    On the other hand, I recently took a class with Bonnie Hunter in VT. Her patterns are so simple I didn't need a class but went for the fun, and had a great time. She did spend about 15 minutes helping several folks determine their true 1/4" seam alignment, and did it as a true teacher by explaining and showing how to make adjustments. Then we were sewing strips, listening to James Taylor, and having bits of Show and Tell from participants. Big difference. Some folks brought their 221's but I decided to leave mine home and bring the ever reliable Brother. Bonnie had already been teaching for 3 days straight and we were the last class, but she was very professional and didn't let it show how tired she must have been. I later caught up on her blog and she's been battling sciatica. Taking a class with her is worth the money for the experience.
    I wish instructors would have a class that meets maybe 45 minutes before the main class to help folks set up their machines, pick fabrics, gather supplies, etc. It is disheartening to waste good class time for those who are truly not close to being ready. An assistant could help the stragglers. I've spent time helping others in classes, but eventually have to do what I went to the class to learn or it's a total waste. I'm sure it's difficult for the teachers as well. I used to teach Nursing courses and being prepared was expected from Day 1 so precious class time wasn't wasted. Learning was encouraged, and those needing a bit of extra help could catch up another time. No sarcasm allowed!

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