Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 3 1 2 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 58

Thread: Bailey's Home Quilter

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    543
    In the June 2009 issue of McCalls Quilting there is an advertisement by Bailey's Home Quilting Machine Co. The machine advertised is called a long-arm machine. It has a 13" throat and appears to be used with the Grace quilting frame or used sittling on a table. Their web site shows a price under $1,600.00 which seems more reasonable than the George machine which has been advertised for aroung $7,000.00. Does anyone know anything about this machine??????

  2. #2
    Super Member tuesy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Home!.. Why? Where are you?
    Posts
    2,259
    HI...I don't know about this machine so much, but they do have a yahoo group for it, plus if you go to their website, you can find out more. http://www.baileyssewingcenter.com/homequilter.html HTH

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    543
    Yes, I did visit their web site, but it would be much better for actual users to tell about the machine -- how it works --- how well the company stands behind the warranty, etc. The price seems more economical than others and the web site did state that Baileys had utilized normal machine parts and then developed additional parts to create the 13" throat. I am wondering if other companies like Singer, Paff, Brother, etc are not in the process of doing the same.

  4. #4
    Moderator littlehud's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    SW Iowa
    Posts
    32,958
    I have heard good things about this machine and it seems Baileys stands behind their machines. I hope to have one someday.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Oh.
    Posts
    798

    I have the Bailey 13" Home Quilting Machine on a GMQ Pro frame.

    I have had it over a year and am happy with it. I, too, could not afford a long arm and wanting to be able to finish my quilts myself, decided to go the route of the Mid-Arm.

    I have noticed that anything that is longer than a 9" arm, is now being called a Long arm. I prefer to call this a mid-arm since it is not a REAL long arm and does not do all the things a Long-arm would do.

    Bailey also makes a 15" mid-arm machine. I chose the 13" because of my age and the amount of money I had to spend. It has done the job that I wanted to get done.

    June

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    543
    Thanks for the reply and info. Can the machine be used sitting on a table for free motion quilting???

  7. #7
    Moderator kathy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    on the Texas Coast
    Posts
    4,050
    I have the Bailey 15" on the GMQ Pro frame. love them both. I'm having a thread breakage issue right now, it only wants to use the Dual Duty spool that he sends with it and I refuse to use that on all my quilts! I'm just a bit stuborn :roll: I think it's mostly the operator :oops: . Mr. Bailey is great at customer service. Mine has a speed regulator, it's like cruise control, it just keeps the motor at a constant speed so all you have to worry about is moving it at the right pace to get uniform stitches. The carrige that comes with it has a place to put the foot pedal and operate it with your hand if you want to go that way, I upgraded to a lightweight aluminum carriage and there is no place to use the pedal so for basting I have to just hold it in my hand. I don't think it would work well on a table for free motion because it's small, like a free arm, no place to put your hands and move the quilt around. I think it's the perfect "starter" longarm. In a year or so I hope to get one with more bells and whistles but for now I'm happy with this one. I have learned to follow pantographs pretty well but I'm not very good at freehand stuff. YET!

  8. #8
    user3587's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Central Oklahoma
    Posts
    404
    I upgraded to a lightweight aluminum carriage
    Do you like this better. I have the Bailey 15" with the Little Gracie II. I'm not really fond of the carriage. It surrounds the machine too much. For a smaller machine it would be okay, it worked fine with our Babylock Quilt Pro, but the Bailey is longer so it's harder to reach around.

  9. #9
    Super Member LindaR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    2,943
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by okie
    I upgraded to a lightweight aluminum carriage
    Do you like this better. I have the Bailey 15" with the Little Gracie II. I'm not really fond of the carriage. It surrounds the machine too much. For a smaller machine it would be okay, it worked fine with our Babylock Quilt Pro, but the Bailey is longer so it's harder to reach around.
    did you have to modify the carriage to take the bailey? I have the original grace frame that first came out. Have never checked to see if the carriage need to be replaced?

  10. #10
    Cookn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    87
    Nana,

    I've read good and bad about the Bailey. It just doesn't seem to be heavy duty enough for our usage. One thing about the Bailey is that price isn't with a frame, so you will also need to purchase one of those.

    You do have an excellent dealer in Spring but they don't sell the Bailey. We are purchasing an Innova from them. The dealer principal is very supportive and offers an excellent training program when you purchase a machine from them. They sell the Voyager, TInLizzie, Nolting, and Innova. I recommend that you make an appointment and test drive a few machine to get a handle on what you like. They are also going to have a booth at the Kingwood Quilt Show this weekend. The nice thing about the Innova is that they are built in Spring (soon to be Conroe) and they are really great and knowledgeable about their machine and super responsive to user questions. It's part of what sold us on the machine. Excellent support from all parties involved.

    http://www.quiltfrog.com/

  11. #11
    user3587's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Central Oklahoma
    Posts
    404
    I think the Bailey is a good starter setup. You would hate to invest thousands of dollars in something and then find out you don't like to quilt or you're not getting your investment back (if going into business). If I like the quilting aspect of this "hobby" then I might consider something else, like the "Jewel". I've only been a piecer and not a quilter in the past. Stitch-in-the-Ditch on my home machine is as close as I've been to to actual quilting. I did a queen size "foldy stuff" and that about killed my arms. The quilt didn't even have batting but it was so heavy I really had a hard time with it. As long as I take excellent care of my presnet setup I think I can resell it to someone looking to get started with their own quilting if I decide to invest further into quilting.

  12. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    543
    Had no idea of this business. Thanks for the info. They are very near me -- just the other side of I 45.

  13. #13
    user3587's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Central Oklahoma
    Posts
    404
    LindaR
    No we didn't have to modify it. It fit fine. My DH is fine with the wooden carriage but I've been sewing for a long time and I feel like my machine is in a cage. I know it's a mind thing. I have shorter arms than DH so if I need to use the wheel I have to walk around the frame to the other side. With the upgrade to an aluminum carriage I wouldn't have to do that. I'm going to make me a "tool belt" to hold my tools so I don't need all that "stuff around the machine" DH likes the wooden carriage because the top holds scissors, threader, tweezers, etc. He has gone back to his old hobby of restoring old pickups so I don't think I will be seeing him around the quilting setup anymore so I guess I can take control and do things to my likeing. :lol:

  14. #14
    Cookn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    87
    Okie,

    You can make a neat tool holder, with curtain rods and a cookie sheet. Just get regular curtain rods that will go across the poles of you machine. I think it's the ones that go out to 28". Screw the cookie sheet to those with the bent part of the rods facing down. It will go right over your fabric poles and stay there until you move it. Because the rods are on the back of the cookie sheet, it has the lip which keeps everything in the sheet.

  15. #15
    Super Member LindaR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    2,943
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by okie
    LindaR
    No we didn't have to modify it. It fit fine. My DH is fine with the wooden carriage but I've been sewing for a long time and I feel like my machine is in a cage. I know it's a mind thing. I have shorter arms than DH so if I need to use the wheel I have to walk around the frame to the other side. With the upgrade to an aluminum carriage I wouldn't have to do that. I'm going to make me a "tool belt" to hold my tools so I don't need all that "stuff around the machine" DH likes the wooden carriage because the top holds scissors, threader, tweezers, etc. He has gone back to his old hobby of restoring old pickups so I don't think I will be seeing him around the quilting setup anymore so I guess I can take control and do things to my likeing. :lol:
    thats very interesting....right now Ihave a juki (9") and my DH connected handihandles to the front of the frame with the off/on switch and cutter on the left button. It works very well but we do have to roll alot. I would love to have more room, at least do a 12" block/one at a time. Thanks, something to think about LOL

  16. #16
    user3587's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Central Oklahoma
    Posts
    404
    I do have to say that is the one thing I miss that the Bailey doesn't have and that is a thread cutter. You know that's why I bought my first Babylock. I had a old Singer and didn't know machines did that. I was so fascinated by that thread cutter, but when I saw a machine thread itself I almost had to pick myself up off the floor.

  17. #17
    Moderator kathy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    on the Texas Coast
    Posts
    4,050
    Linda, to do a 12" design at the end of the quilt I think you'll have to have a real long arm. When I'm at the end of a queen size with traditional cotton (thin) batting, a 7" is about all I can get to on my 15". I have to walk around to get to the front or back of my machine, I can't reach the wheel from the front. That's one of the bells I want on a new one, thread pick up. :wink:

  18. #18
    user3587's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Central Oklahoma
    Posts
    404
    have to walk around to get to the front or back of my machine, I can't reach the wheel from the front.
    Even with the upgraded carridge you have to walk around? If it weren't for the wooden carriage I was thinking I could reach the wheel. I can get a finger on it now but no grip. I was hoping the upgrade would help with this problem. I was going to order an upgrade tomorrow, now I may not if you still have to walk around to take up the thread with the wheel.

  19. #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Oh.
    Posts
    798
    I think I missed something in this discussion.

    The trolley on which the machine sits, has a frame that "wraps around" and has a shelf on top. I find that adequate to lay out my tools. Sort of like the dentists' office. There are slots for your scissors. I keep one pair in there always, faithfully put them back after each snip. Then I keep my long tweezers for threading the needle, along with my magnifying eyeglasses so I can see to thread the needle, a crochet hook for fishing the bobbin thread when I pull it up to begin a line of stitching. I also have a small screwdriver (not sure why) and seam ripper (also for "fishing" threads)

    The Speed control (which came with my machine) can be attached on the front or the back of the frame. There is no need to use the foot control to operate this machine.

    I watched a long arm quilter pull her threads to the surface, at the end of her stitching, and snip them with the scissor. This works well for me.

    Depending on how tightly you wind the quilt, you will have various amounts of quilting space left at the tail end of the quilt. I made some single pantographs for filling blocks and started with a 12" design and finished by reducing it to 10" and just squeezed it in.

    For me, I love to do the free motion. I felt the pantograph designs, done from the back of the machine, are a bit tedious to keep the design running in a smooth motion. sometimes they were "jerky" looking, but once I began free motion quilting, I don't care to go back to doing the pantographs.

    Each quilter will expect certain things from their machine. I do not aim for Professional appearing quilt designs. I do not require blocks that are filled with feathers and designs. while they are beautiful, I do not have the need to spend hours getting every stitch in place and perfectly done. They are "professional" for a reason. I enjoy the free motion that appears to be a quilt done for fun! And since my quilts go into disaster areas around the world, the idea of hours of quilting is not compatible with my reason for making quilts in the first place.

    Each person who is considering the purchase of a quilting machine needs to evaluate exactly what they want to accomplish. I do not believe that the quilting machine should compete with a hand quilter.

    There are all sorts of styles and reasons. Think about it and then go for the machine that will give you the best results. If you cannot afford the machine you really want, modify your expectations. I did. I know I have about 10 years worth of quilts left in me, so I want to make as many as I can before I pass my machine and frame along to someone else.

    Someone mentioned a thread issue. Once you work out the kinks in the tensions, you should be able to use any kind of thread. I use only one brand in the bobbin case because the tension is set for that thread, so to save myself additional headaches, I buy that one brand for my bobbin winding. Otherwise, I have used JoAnn's cheaper cone thread with no problem. Like I have said previously, the problems I have encountered with the Bailey is usually operator related. Once you get the hang of it, it is a great little machine.

    Call Chuck. He is the greatest dealer to work with.

    June

  20. #20
    Super Member marla's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Charleston, SC
    Posts
    1,639
    They may exhibit them at quilt shows where you can try it. People I meet who bought longarms say it is not worth buying the cheaper longarms as they are harder to set up and do not work well.
    It's a lot to invest so do your homework.

  21. #21
    Member desertdebbe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Marana, Arizona
    Posts
    88
    Nana,

    I own a 13" Bailey and have loved it since day one.
    It is a very simple machine to own and operate. I bought mine
    because I could not find one person who owned one who didn't
    like it. Buying one is a purchase you will not regret. I would spend
    the extra amount and get the 15".

    I have a forum just for Bailey owners if you'd like to join and get
    others input. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Baileyquiltingmachines/

    Debbe

  22. #22
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Oh.
    Posts
    798
    Debbe, thanks for sharing and for telling us about the forum. That is such a neat idea.

    When asking for input on various machines and frames, I would like to hear from the actual owner/operator as opposed to getting feedback from those who "heard" something.

    Experience far outweighs hearsay!

    June

  23. #23
    Connie811's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Louisiana
    Posts
    16
    My First Bailey was a 13 now I own Bailey 15, My first frame was a Little Gracie 11 .. Now I have my Bailey 15 on a SuzyQ king ..I haven't had any problems with Bailey but I've found that it loves cotton thread.. top and bobbin more than any other kind.. Also I have found there is difference between the 13 and 15 Bailey's .. On the 15 I can use pantographs up to 11" but It's a sure thing if one would go with a 10" pantograph.. The last quilting turn most of the time is lots less room to quilt in .. still no problem to make adjustments .. As for Throat space, I can roll an oversize King under the throat. no problem there either!
    By the way, I have bought both of my machines sight unseen and I don't regret it at all.. These Bailey's don't have any bells or whistles but they're work horses!
    Connie in Louisiana

  24. #24
    Super Member butterflywing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    currently central new jersey
    Posts
    8,700
    have you considered other machines at all? if so, which ones?

  25. #25
    Connie811's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Louisiana
    Posts
    16
    Yes I did consider another machine at that time It was a Voyager 17 but then I had found out the largest machine that would fit Little Gracie11 would have to be a 16in throat.. Now even with a larger frame that can hold up to the size of an 18" Throat I'm staying with Bailey's
    Connie in Louisiana

Page 1 of 3 1 2 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.