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Thread: Batiks....colors running

  1. #1
    Senior Member ShabbyTabby's Avatar
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    Batiks....colors running

    I have a stash of Batiks but have not quilted with them yet. Should I wash them first and if so how. I'd hate to make a quilt and have it ruined...any advice will be appreciated.
    Families are like old quilts....although they tend to unravel at times...each can be stitched back together with love.

  2. #2
    Senior Member pinkberrykay's Avatar
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    If you are worried about then running soak them in Retayne so they colors are set before you wash in cold water.

  3. #3
    Super Member Rumbols's Avatar
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    I am completely self taught so don't know if this is correct but it is the way I do my fabrics. I wash them the way I would wash the quilt. I lump all the same type of colors together and put a color catcher in to catch the excess dyes. Then I dry the same way, with the regular setting on my dryer. Been doing this for 35 plus years. Hope this helps.

  4. #4
    Power Poster joyce888's Avatar
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    I rhink pinkberrykay gave you good advice. You can also use the "Color Catcher" sheets, found in the grocery store.
    Joyce

    Four things you can't recover: The stone.....after the throw. The word......after its said. The occasion.....after its missed. The time......after its gone

  5. #5
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    follow the instructions on a bottle of retayne---and throw in a couple 'color-catchers' from Shout- in the grocery store laundry isle. if the color catchers come out with color- rewash the fabrics- or sort out-figure out which one is the culprit & re-wash that one- rewash until there is no more bleeding before using in a quilt that will be laundered.
    i pre-wash all of my batiks---in a normal wash- with warm water & my regular detergent- some people (baby them) alot more than i would ever consider- i figure if they won't hold up to a regular wash- they are not going to hold up in a quilt....but that's me. when there is no bleeding apparent i toss them into the dryer- again on a regular cycle- i do not use fabric softener on them- if i might decide to use a fusable with them fabric softener can affect how well it works.
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

  6. #6
    Senior Member ShabbyTabby's Avatar
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    Thanks, I think I had better try to set the colors before I start cutting or piecing....
    Families are like old quilts....although they tend to unravel at times...each can be stitched back together with love.

  7. #7
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    follow the instructions on a bottle of retayne---and throw in a couple 'color-catchers' from Shout- in the grocery store laundry isle. if the color catchers come out with color- rewash the fabrics- or sort out-figure out which one is the culprit & re-wash that one- rewash until there is no more bleeding before using in a quilt that will be laundered.
    i pre-wash all of my batiks---in a normal wash- with warm water & my regular detergent- some people (baby them) alot more than i would ever consider- i figure if they won't hold up to a regular wash- they are not going to hold up in a quilt....but that's me. when there is no bleeding apparent i toss them into the dryer- again on a regular cycle- i do not use fabric softener on them- if i might decide to use a fusable with them fabric softener can affect how well it works.
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

  8. #8
    Super Member caspharm's Avatar
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    I've made the quilt and then washed it with about 4-5 color catchers.

  9. #9
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
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    I would strongley recommend you pretreat them with Retayne. As the cost of fabrics , specifically batiks... the cost of pretreating is minimal... The cost of finding out the hard way.... too high!

  10. #10
    Super Member QuiltnLady1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rumbols View Post
    I am completely self taught so don't know if this is correct but it is the way I do my fabrics. I wash them the way I would wash the quilt. I lump all the same type of colors together and put a color catcher in to catch the excess dyes. Then I dry the same way, with the regular setting on my dryer. Been doing this for 35 plus years. Hope this helps.
    This is what I do -- I don't like adding more chemicals to the cloth but like to get the excess dye out -- particularly the deep blue, red and black.
    QuiltnLady1

    When life gives you lemons, make lemonade.

  11. #11
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
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    Prewashing with Retayne is a great idea, but it's more complicated than just soaking a bunch of fabric. It takes very hot water and 20 minutes of agitation, either by hand or machine, for it to work properly. Here's the instructions.
    http://www.prochemical.com/directions/Retayne.htm
    The Earth without art is just "Eh".

  12. #12
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    How to make sure fabrics are colorfast:

    I just came across a very good article written by a woman who dyes a lot of her own fabrics. She did some research and found the best way to prevent the dyes in ANY fabric from running is to let them sit in a lot of water for at least 12 hours. You can read her article here:

    http://vickiwelsh.typepad.com/field_...d-fabrics.html

  13. #13
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    It depends a lot on the batiks. I don't normally prewash batiks, but I do test suspicious colors. First I rub a small piece against some white cloth to see if any color "crocks". Then I let a piece sit in a glass of water will to see if dye particles bleed into the water. Finally, I rub the damp batik against white fabric to see if any color transfers.

    Most batiks I do not bother to test, and most of those I test do not bleed. A bleeder gets a Retayne treatment. (A few batiks require two Retayne treatments. If the dye isn't stable after 2 Retayne treatments, it doesn't go into a quilt.)

    Another precaution I take is with the first washing of a quilt. I use Synthrapol and a *lot* of hot water for the first wash, along with several color catchers, so if there is any slight bleeding the excess dye goes out with the rinse water. I also am careful not to let damp fabrics sit next to each other; right after the washing machine, the quilt goes into the dryer.

    Maybe it's the brands of batiks I buy, but I have not found them to bleed any more than other fabrics. I know that home-dyed batiks can bleed a lot, though.

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