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Thread: Battery Operated Sewing Machine

  1. #51
    Super Member janetter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by quiltsRfun
    Quote Originally Posted by yolanda
    thanks again to everyone for their suggestions -- i will take along hand work of some sort --- still feeling silly for my post
    No need to feel silly. It was a good question.
    Definately do not feel silly. We camp to and it crossed my mind as well. Now I have an answer to a question I was to chicken to ask myself :lol:

  2. #52
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    I take my big machine with, I'm used to it and no how it works and nothing else will do.

  3. #53
    Super Member bjnicholson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by yolanda
    I didn't think of a handcrank - very nice! Actually I feel silly posting this and have decided to learn to crochet or bring along a swedish weave project I have waiting in a closet ;-)
    Ooooo, Swedish Weaving. I love to do that! Very relaxing...unless you count something wrong!

  4. #54
    Super Member janetter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by QBeth
    Quote Originally Posted by irishrose
    Quilters on the vintage site love handcranks for camping. I can't speak from experience, but it'd sew a better seam if you can find one.
    My significant other is into antique car shows. Personally, I can stand it for about 5 minutes but I want to be with him. Solution? Quilt while he gawks!

    Here's a picture of his '62 T-bird (on the left) and a $80, 000 restored Tbird on the right. In the middle is me and my hand crank. It was wonderful to be able to do SOMETHING while there. Plus, IMHO, I pulled in the crowds because people were curious about what I was doing. The funniest thing was how many didn't know about hand crank machines! :-)

    By the way, I made VERY sure that my umbrella, if it fell over, wouldn't come close to the $80K car!!! I also found it funny that the owner, who I'll call Mr. Old Grumpy, complained about my sewing taking attention away from his car! :roll: But, as I said, I was pulling in the crowds!! he he he
    LOVING IT!! my DH is a car buff too and has dragged my along wish I had thought of this then LOL

  5. #55
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    I think it was a good question as well, because I also have wondered a out these battery machines.

  6. #56
    Super Member jljack's Avatar
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    Ohhh!! I just asked DH, and our tent trailer will run my sewing machine!! Huh OH!!! :-)

    Yes, an older hand crank machine will probably be much better than battery operated. Good luck!!

  7. #57
    Super Member jljack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by QBeth
    Quote Originally Posted by irishrose
    Quilters on the vintage site love handcranks for camping. I can't speak from experience, but it'd sew a better seam if you can find one.
    My significant other is into antique car shows. Personally, I can stand it for about 5 minutes but I want to be with him. Solution? Quilt while he gawks!

    Here's a picture of his '62 T-bird (on the left) and a $80, 000 restored Tbird on the right. In the middle is me and my hand crank. It was wonderful to be able to do SOMETHING while there. Plus, IMHO, I pulled in the crowds because people were curious about what I was doing. The funniest thing was how many didn't know about hand crank machines! :-)

    By the way, I made VERY sure that my umbrella, if it fell over, wouldn't come close to the $80K car!!! I also found it funny that the owner, who I'll call Mr. Old Grumpy, complained about my sewing taking attention away from his car! :roll: But, as I said, I was pulling in the crowds!! he he he
    Hahaha!! Hey....what's my '62 Bird doing with you? I have one same color, only we're in CA!!! :-) I LOVE seeing you sitting there sewing. Great idea!!!

  8. #58
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    I don't think it is a silly post at all. I didn't know they made machines with batteries and I would have never thought of a handcrank machine. I say go for it.

  9. #59
    Junior Member yesyoucan's Avatar
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    make room for a trendle machine

  10. #60
    Super Member donnalynett's Avatar
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    If there isn't any electricity, can you run a generator where you camp?

  11. #61
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    the older i get, the more i love not camping. so, when we go, i make sure he parks us somewhere with electric hookup, and i bring a machine. sorry, love, i won't be riding that 30 mile trail with you, but i will be keeping the homefires burning--and QUILTING!!!! if there is absolutely no electric, i bring fabric, rotary cutters, and a mat. there will--no, there MUST be fabric. and if i must bring hook and yarn, he will do penance by stopping at a quilt shop somewhere along the line.

    it's a legit concern! i love doing many kinds of hand work, and have options--but there is nothing finer than cutting and/or sewing fabric in the fresh air and sunshine. and if it ends up smelling a little like wood smoke, that's ust a plus in my book!

  12. #62
    Super Member Happy Tails's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by yolanda
    PS.. of all places this board is where i thought for sure i'd find someone whos' thought of this or who could give me suggestions - i am taking the silence to suggest i do need some help ... :-) "Hi my name is Yolanda and I am addicted to making quilts..." ;-)
    OMG I can't stop laughing....we really all need serious help...lolol God love ya, I hope you get your piecing done...lolol

  13. #63

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    It will use A LOT of batterys. What if you cut out your quilt (NO batterys needed). Good luck!

  14. #64
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    get you a small generator, one that will run a 110 sewing machine ,not the computerized one ,, they are noisy but you can sew ,,how do i know,,,,,,,,, dont ask .. he he he

  15. #65
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    No question is too silly to ask. That is why we are here to share & learn. I love working on the cathedral window when I need to do hand work. I also loom knit. I have a sewing machine in the motorhome and sometimes use it on the picnic table. There is electricity where we camp.

  16. #66
    Super Member chuckbere15's Avatar
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    I take mine with me. We have a seasonal sit with electric. And I spend weeks at a time there.

  17. #67
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    Believe the battery operated ones do not make the regular sewing stitches and would not be very sturdy. And do not apologise for your post.

    Hugs

    Helen

  18. #68
    Power Poster Annaquilts's Avatar
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    I would see if you could find an antique hand crank or convert an old machine to a hand crank. I do english paper piecing and read a lot of quilt books.

    Now wouldn't this be the perfect hand crank to take along.
    http://wn.com/handcrank

  19. #69
    Power Poster Annaquilts's Avatar
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    Nice hand crank! What model is it?


    Quote Originally Posted by QBeth
    Quote Originally Posted by irishrose
    Quilters on the vintage site love handcranks for camping. I can't speak from experience, but it'd sew a better seam if you can find one.
    My significant other is into antique car shows. Personally, I can stand it for about 5 minutes but I want to be with him. Solution? Quilt while he gawks!

    Here's a picture of his '62 T-bird (on the left) and a $80, 000 restored Tbird on the right. In the middle is me and my hand crank. It was wonderful to be able to do SOMETHING while there. Plus, IMHO, I pulled in the crowds because people were curious about what I was doing. The funniest thing was how many didn't know about hand crank machines! :-)

    By the way, I made VERY sure that my umbrella, if it fell over, wouldn't come close to the $80K car!!! I also found it funny that the owner, who I'll call Mr. Old Grumpy, complained about my sewing taking attention away from his car! :roll: But, as I said, I was pulling in the crowds!! he he he

  20. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by quiltsRfun
    Quote Originally Posted by yolanda
    I didn't think of a handcrank - very nice! Actually I feel silly posting this and have decided to learn to crochet or bring along a swedish weave project I have waiting in a closet ;-)
    How about a hand piecing project?
    Do you know how to hand sew a 3D bow tie block?
    It is 5 squares, but you only sew 4 seams, and goes fast!
    I mean really fast!
    But, and there is always one of those...
    ifn you don't know how to make it, you are going to need somebody to teach you how.

    If you want another easy hand sewed block, cut a lot of two and a half inch blocks,and sew them into four patch blocks.
    Cut a lot of triangles, that have the longest side the same size as the four patches + plus generous seam allowance! Sew the four triangles around the four patches to make a very fancy looking "Square within a Square" block.

    After, trim all the blocks to the exact same size, and sew them all together, Now you have fooled everybody! You don't have to tell them how easy that "complicated" block really is!
    Easiest is to make it with lots of tone on tone small prints.
    Leave out the darks and lights...Use all medium tones, the colors will tell your story for you this time!

  21. #71
    Super Member slk350's Avatar
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    Bring a generator with you LOL

  22. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by milp04
    Quote Originally Posted by yolanda
    I am going camping and am considering bringing along one of those inexpensive battery operated sewing machines to do some piecing. Has anyone used one? Have any recommendations?

    Hi Yolanda,

    Typically sewers are not happy with these sewing machines.

    You could find out if your camping site is equipped with electric and take a 3/4 size machine depending on how long you plan on camping.

    This might be a good time to start a hand project to take along camping. There are several great options. One would be the GFG, Grandmother's Flower Garden. It's a great take along. The Cathedral Window is another hand sewing project. It can be started at home by machine and then worked by hand when away from home, another take along.

    There are several others that would be something to check into but I'm not able to put a name to them at this time. I'll repost if I think of them later.

    I personally like to spend outdoor time with some sort of handwork. I like the quietness of camping. I like to do redwork type stitching and have several in different colors so I don't get bored. I'm also thinking of starting a GFG to use up small scrap sizes. There was a nice posting of someone who had a nice plastic container to take along her project as she traveled.

    Good luck, enjoy camping.

    Pam M
    The posting you are talking about inspired me to start GFG. I am in the Bahama's right now & my project is with me. We also camp & this will be my take along project.

  23. #73
    Senior Member Quilter54's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by svenskaflicka1
    the older i get, the more i love not camping. so, when we go, i make sure he parks us somewhere with electric hookup, and i bring a machine. sorry, love, i won't be riding that 30 mile trail with you, but i will be keeping the homefires burning--and QUILTING!!!! if there is absolutely no electric, i bring fabric, rotary cutters, and a mat. there will--no, there MUST be fabric. and if i must bring hook and yarn, he will do penance by stopping at a quilt shop somewhere along the line.

    it's a legit concern! i love doing many kinds of hand work, and have options--but there is nothing finer than cutting and/or sewing fabric in the fresh air and sunshine. and if it ends up smelling a little like wood smoke, that's ust a plus in my book!
    Amen sister!!!

  24. #74
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    i had a friend that discovered she could plug her featherweight into the lighter plug in her van so sewed while traveling.

    Yes hand piecing is the way to go then don't have the aggrivation of trying to make the machine work.

    For hand crank machines - go to Amish country. I understand in the Lancaster area there is a man who has made a hand crank adapter for electric machines.
    sells them out of his shop.

  25. #75
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    Could you buy a converter that plugs into the cigarette lighter in your vehicle? We use them for our cell phone adapters but you might need one with more power for a sewing machine. In Canada, we have bought them at Canadian Tire. Walmart may have them as well.

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