Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 26

Thread: Batting question

  1. #1
    Super Member meyert's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Southern Indiana
    Posts
    2,814

    Batting question

    Hello.... I am making my son a quilt to take with him to college. Its not a pieced quilt, he didn't want anything "busy" its just going to be very simple... but I have a batting question. Does the batting make the quilt warmer - or can it make it too warm? I have minky material for backing and the front will be flannel. I really like the look of batting in a quilt... the puff makes it look cuddly and comfy. But I don't want the quilt to be too hot either...... any ideas? Will some batting be less warm than others?

  2. #2
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    34,877
    Are you planning to quilt or tie the layers together? Some use fleece or Minky backing for quilts and don't add any batt.

  3. #3
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Western Wisconsin
    Posts
    12,955
    Blog Entries
    1
    Batting affects warmth. There are so many batting choices, we really need to know whether you intend to quilt or tie before making a recommendation. Also whether you want it to have only a little added warmth, moderate added warmth, or a lot of added warmth.

  4. #4
    Super Member meyert's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Southern Indiana
    Posts
    2,814
    Thank you for your replies. I want to add as little warmth as possible. I have done quilts with fleece that I have not added any batting to - and that is fine. I just like the look of batting once it is quilted.. the puff created looks very comfy. I will most likely machine quilt this... not exactly sure what you mean by "tie". Do you mean the no sew quilts?

  5. #5
    Power Poster ManiacQuilter2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    18,938
    Just for you to know, I hope that you tie the quilt because I have heard a lot of quilters have posted their problems when quilting with Minkie because it can so easily stretch !!
    A Good Friend, like an old quilt, is both a Treasure and a Comfort

  6. #6
    Super Member meyert's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Southern Indiana
    Posts
    2,814
    What do you mean by "tie the quilt"? I don't know what you mean, please explain.

  7. #7
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    34,877
    Instead of quilting quilts, some people "tie" their quilts. You thread a large needle with yarn, embroidery floss, perle cotton etc. and with your quilt laying on a flat surface, you go through the layer from the top, go under about 1/4 inch of the sandwich and back up to the top. Tie the 2 ends of the thread together in a double knot and clip the threads at about 1/2 inch long. These " ties" are made every 3 -4 inches over the surface of the quilt.

  8. #8
    Super Member meyert's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Southern Indiana
    Posts
    2,814
    Thank you for your explanation Tartan. I have done this before years ago, I must have done it wrong because they came untied so I am afraid to do that again..... does Minky stretch so much that it is unable to be machine quilted?

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    FL
    Posts
    44
    I have quilted baby quilts with minky and no batting. They are lightweight and cozy. I didn't have any problem quilting with minky on my reg sewing machine.

  10. #10
    Super Member meyert's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Southern Indiana
    Posts
    2,814
    Thank you for your response jalling. I am just starting my blanket and I have never used minky before, but have always wanted to

  11. #11
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    34,877
    Many on QB have successfully quilted Minky. One way stretches more than the other so quilt in the direction with less stretch and pin well.

  12. #12
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Posts
    11,902
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by ManiacQuilter2 View Post
    Just for you to know, I hope that you tie the quilt because I have heard a lot of quilters have posted their problems when quilting with Minkie because it can so easily stretch !!
    minkie quilts up beautifully- I've use minkie and quilted many, many quilts over the years. a tied quilt is one where instead of quilting either yarn or embroidery floss, perle cotton is used to make little knots about every 4" in a grid over the quilt- a stitch is made through the quilt sandwich the 2 ends are tied into a double square knot then the ties are trimmed to a 'standard' length. if you use a thin cotton batt in your quilt it will not add as much 'warmth' as a polyester batting -- wool is actually my favorite batting for lightweight fluffy batting- it breaths and is good in summer quilts as well as winter ones.
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

  13. #13
    Super Member petthefabric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Eastern Madera County, Ca
    Posts
    1,672
    A quilt of flannel and minky will be warm. Probably warm enough for most housing situations. I don't think it'll need batting for warmth. If you want puffy, I'd recommend a wool batt. Because the fiber content of the three layers are very different and different properties, a wool batt will be warm. Maybe it could be made like a duvey (sp) and it could be filled with a down comforter and no quilting stitches.

  14. #14
    Super Member kiffie2413's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    3,817
    Blog Entries
    1
    Here is a link to a quilt I did for my son, it has minky fabric on front and regular cotton on back. I did machine applique for the football details after using 505 basting spray to put the layers together. I had no problems with stretching and the football is 91 inches from tip to tip as my son is 6' 3" tall...At 1st I debated using fleece or flannel in place of the cotton fabric, so glad I didn't as it is plenty warm as it is.

    http://www.quiltingboard.com/pictures-f5/football-shaped-blanket-t201620.html


    Regards,
    K
    Always do right. This will gratify some people and astonish the rest~Mark Twain

  15. #15
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Western Wisconsin
    Posts
    12,955
    Blog Entries
    1
    I think that Mountain Mist Lite batting (it is polyester) would be good since you will be quilting instead of tying. It is very thin, adds very little warmth, but provides a little puffiness. Requires quilting lines no more than 3" apart. I have used this batting for baby quilts and it quilts up very nicely. The quilt remains very soft too. Our local JoAnne Fabrics carries it, and it is inexpensive.

    If you can spray baste with 505, that is one of the best ways to prevent stretching of the minky.

    Also, I ***strongly*** recommend heavily starching the flannel top before layering. I recommend a 1:1 solution of Sta-Flo liquid laundry starch and water. The way I do it is very easy. I use a large wall painting brush to saturate the fabric with the solution (kitchen island works great), wait a minute or so to make sure that the starch has a chance to penetrate the fibers, toss in the dryer, then iron with steam. This heavy starching ensures that the flannel will not stretch or distort on you while machine quilting. To get rid of it, just wash the quilt once after it is bound.

  16. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Elkhart, KS
    Posts
    409
    I longarm minky all the time. Just don't load it tight or stretch it.
    ~Laura

  17. #17
    Super Member meyert's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Southern Indiana
    Posts
    2,814
    Thank you for your replies... I have a lot to think about now kiffie2413 I love your football quilt thanks for sharing. I will check into the batting.... is wool batting machine washable?

  18. #18
    Super Member kiffie2413's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    3,817
    Blog Entries
    1
    Here is a link to some great info about wool batting:
    http://www.lovebugstudios.com/2012/0...-wool-batting/
    I can't speak from experience about it being washable as I haven't used it (I am allergic to wool and handling it during the quilting process wouldn't be a great idea for me...lol).
    Regards,
    K
    Always do right. This will gratify some people and astonish the rest~Mark Twain

  19. #19
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Brooksville, FL
    Posts
    206
    Blog Entries
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by ManiacQuilter2 View Post
    Just for you to know, I hope that you tie the quilt because I have heard a lot of quilters have posted their problems when quilting with Minkie because it can so easily stretch !!

    I just finished machine quilting a baby blanket with minky on the front and back. I did not use any batting. I also used Elmer's glue to hold together to guilt. No problem with stretching. The only problem was seeing what I was quilting. Stitches get lost in the minky.

  20. #20
    Senior Member janeknapp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Marion, IA
    Posts
    461
    Be sure to prewash flannel as it shrinks when washed.

    Read "how much it shrunk" thread in today's digest regarding flannel.
    Last edited by janeknapp; 08-05-2013 at 03:45 AM.

  21. #21
    Senior Member Gabrielle's Mimi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Sunny AZ
    Posts
    576
    Blog Entries
    1
    I have made quilts with Minkee for the backing without any problems (except the fuzz all over me!). I did make the first one with batting, but it was very heavy! After that I skipped the batting when using Minkee for the back. Good luck!
    Create with joy in your heart!

  22. #22
    Super Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Central Wisconsin
    Posts
    3,970
    Quote Originally Posted by Tartan View Post
    Instead of quilting quilts, some people "tie" their quilts. You thread a large needle with yarn, embroidery floss, perle cotton etc. and with your quilt laying on a flat surface, you go through the layer from the top, go under about 1/4 inch of the sandwich and back up to the top. Tie the 2 ends of the thread together in a double knot and clip the threads at about 1/2 inch long. These " ties" are made every 3 -4 inches over the surface of the quilt.
    Tied quilts are "quilted". Anything that holds the three layers (sometimes only two) together is quilting.

    I put my quilts on a large frame made of four sticks - 1X4's - with holes drilled every 6 inches all the way down the stick. I have a strip of fabric stapled all along the length of each stick. They are then held together with bolts and the fabric is pinned to the fabric strip on the stick. After the outside edges have been finished as far as I can reach, bolts are removed one side at a time and it gets rolled up on the sticks and the bolts put in a new place.

    I have tied two quilts with pearl cotton and they promptly came loose. I had to go over the entire quilt with fray-check on each knot to be sure they wouldn't come undone again. Those I tied with wool yarn NEVER come out. They just get tighter each time you wash them.

    Some people tie the knots tightly to the quilt, and some leave them loose so that the batting remains fluffy under the knot. Some people cut the ends of the threads about a half inch long, and others leave them up to four inches long. Most of the embroidery-thread-tied quilts I've seen have the threads about four inches long.

    Some tape their quilt backs to a smooth floor with duct tape, then pin the other layers to the back and work around it on the floor. Some clamp the quilt layers to a table a section at a time and move it as each section is tied..

    Lots of different ways to do this. Hope you can understand this.
    Mavita - Square dancer and One Room School Teacher

  23. #23
    Super Member AZ Jane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    2,675
    Quote Originally Posted by cmierley View Post
    I just finished machine quilting a baby blanket with minky on the front and back. I did not use any batting. I also used Elmer's glue to hold together to guilt. No problem with stretching. The only problem was seeing what I was quilting. Stitches get lost in the minky.

    That was my thought on the stretching issue. Love my Elmer's!!
    Better to do something imperfectly, than nothing perfectly.
    Done is better than perfect.

  24. #24
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Newark, Ohio
    Posts
    138
    I just made a quilt with minkee 10" squares (layer cake) and used it for the backing also. I put an 80/20 batting in it, I had seriously thought about not putting batting in, but the more I thought about it I decided to do it. The girls getting these are not in a warm climate. For sewing I used a ballpoint needle and a long stitch to put the pieces together and for the machine quilting. I used a glue stick where points came together and did a lot of pinning. I would send a photo, but I have absolutely no clue how to do this. It was a bit of a slow process, but it came together beautifully. I will be doing another very similar doing the same thing.

  25. #25
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Falcon, Colorado
    Posts
    151
    Maviskw, that is a great response! On the plain's of the US most farmer women did not have but a few, what we now consider quilts, they had many chores to do and did not have the hours to devote to quilting so the quilts were tied, I have one from my grandmother and one from my great grandmother. Quilting was done at your quilting bee and they would take turns going from one person to the next making a quilt, so you might only get one quilted quilt every 3 years. These were not used for everyday uses, they were almost always just in the mom's room or on the back of the couch. They were always folded up at night and sat aside so they didn't get dirty or tore. My grandmother never used the quilted quilts (elsewhere) till all the kids left home, the guest room have one on it and we were sternly warned about being careful with it! So that explains why I have hundred year old quilts....

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.