Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 3 1 2 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 64

Thread: Batting question

  1. #1
    Senior Member lhavelka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Pittsburgh PA
    Posts
    598
    So I know that I am probably not the only one who has this problem. I buy queen size batting warm and natural and end up with excess. The quilt I am working on now is 66x80. The queen is 90x102. So after I cut out what I need, is there a way to put two pieces of batting together so that I dont waste all this batting? Do I sew it together or I thought of taking a piecing of fusing and ironing to together?

    Any suggestions?

  2. #2
    Power Poster erstan947's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Louisiana
    Posts
    12,168
    Blog Entries
    47
    I butt the two edges together and zigzag to join

  3. #3
    Super Member Lisa_wanna_b_quilter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    The middle of an IL cornfield
    Posts
    7,024
    Blog Entries
    1
    I butt the edges together and use a zig zag stitch to hold it together. I've heard of some people using some type of fusible to do it also.

  4. #4
    Super Member Jennifer22206's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    state of confusion
    Posts
    4,775
    Blog Entries
    4
    I zig zag stitch mine. works wonderfully.

    Or I use my small pieces in my miniature quilts.

  5. #5
    Senior Member lhavelka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Pittsburgh PA
    Posts
    598
    I definitely thought about zig zagging it together but I didnt know if it would show a seam in the quilt.

  6. #6
    Super Member brushandthimble's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    North of Boston, MA, USA
    Posts
    3,630
    overlap two pieces and cut with rotary cutter in a smooth large wave and zig zag together by butting the pieces together not overlapping the edges. never shows through.
    THEN there is the fusiable joining, either with the new tape you can buy or I have cut thin strips of fusiable web and used that for wall hangings.

  7. #7
    RST
    RST is offline
    Senior Member RST's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    940
    Blog Entries
    6
    I do the wide zig zag, and never have any trouble with it showing through. I also use smaller pieces for little projects like bags or hotpads. I store all my scraps and strips of batting rolled up in a big zippered floor-pillow case. It's an ok pillow on a daybed, it stays clean and relatively smooth, and it's easy to find when I need it.

    RST

  8. #8
    Power Poster sueisallaboutquilts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    17,462
    Quote Originally Posted by erstan947
    I butt the two edges together and zigzag to join
    Me too.

  9. #9
    mim
    mim is offline
    Super Member mim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    maine/washington
    Posts
    1,392
    Quote Originally Posted by sueisallaboutquilts
    Quote Originally Posted by erstan947
    I butt the two edges together and zigzag to join
    Me too.
    sometimes, if it is a wall hanging, i will hand sew a tailors baste stitch. I like the idea of a wavy cut and zig zag with the largest stitch. I use mostly fiberfill because of allergies in people I give t that is easy to but and baste

    Mim in very cold tonite Maine

  10. #10
    Super Member Jan in VA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Piedmont Virginia in the Foothills of the Blue Ridge Mtns.
    Posts
    8,213
    Quote Originally Posted by brushandthimble
    overlap two pieces and cut with rotary cutter in a smooth large wave and zig zag together by butting the pieces together not overlapping the edges. never shows through.
    THEN there is the fusiable joining, either with the new tape you can buy or I have cut thin strips of fusiable web and used that for wall hangings.
    You know, I've been quilting for decades and butting batting for much of that time, but it never occurred to me straighten the dang edge like you describe! An old wallpaperer's trick; can't believe I didn't apply it here, LOL! :mrgreen:

    Love this board!
    Jan in VA

  11. #11
    joan_quilts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Close to Breezewood, PA
    Posts
    398
    I use a lot of my extra batting in rag quilts. Small pices to large ones. I have sewn it together and used in bigger projects too. I haven't had any problems.

  12. #12
    Senior Member Boscobd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    997
    Zigzag for me too! Works great - never had a problem with it in a finished quilt

  13. #13
    Senior Member grandmajuki's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Western CO
    Posts
    694
    Here's the web site to the iron on tape for putting batting together.. It really does work great!! I quilt for others and almost always when they zig/zag the batting together it either has holes or it puckers..this works great!!
    http://www.heatpressbattingtogether.com/
    Judy

  14. #14
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    IL Quad-cities
    Posts
    252
    Blog Entries
    1
    I like to overlap my batting pieces and make a wavy cut, removing the short pieces and hand basting the butted edges. I find zig-zag stitching compresses the batting more than I like. I haven't used the product made for fusing batting together, but I like to hand quilt and wonder if that would make the batting harder to quilt in the fused area?

  15. #15
    Super Member tjradj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    London, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    1,329
    Blog Entries
    1
    I don't butt them together, but I overlap them by about 1/2". Then I use my fingers to pull the edge for I pull out enough "fluff" to make the edges feather out. I do that on the front and the back. By the time I'm done, there is no noticeable bump in the quilt and I KNOW it's not going to come apart.

  16. #16
    a regular here BarbZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Augusta, Maine
    Posts
    666
    Blog Entries
    4
    I butt them together and zig zag. It comes out fine especially after you machine quilt whatever you use it in. I put a whole bunch of strips together side by side that I had left from trimming and used the piece for potholders or hot mats. Can't waiste that stuff you know. Yes it is COLD her in Maine.

  17. #17
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Out searching for some sunshine :-)
    Posts
    59,092
    Blog Entries
    1
    I like to use a zig zag stitch, make it loose, adjust your tension so that the stitches don't sink clear into it :D:D:D

  18. #18
    Peggi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Mich. beautiful U.P.
    Posts
    166
    I went into the website for the tape, ordered 3 rolls, my zig-zag always puckers & this looks like the cat's meow!!

  19. #19
    Super Member quiltmom04's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    2,877
    Quote Originally Posted by brushandthimble
    overlap two pieces and cut with rotary cutter in a smooth large wave and zig zag together by butting the pieces together not overlapping the edges. never shows through.
    THEN there is the fusiable joining, either with the new tape you can buy or I have cut thin strips of fusiable web and used that for wall hangings.
    This is how i cut them, too. Butt the edges, too, but I do a hand baste rather than a machine stitch as it give it less of a visible line. I mostly save the leftovers for tablerunners.

  20. #20
    Senior Member Up4BigChal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Shakopee MN
    Posts
    507
    Buy Fusible Interfacing cut it in 2" strips and join your left over batting that way, This works great and is really an inexpensive way to use up all your scraps

  21. #21

    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    CA & NM
    Posts
    1,125
    Quote Originally Posted by RST
    I do the wide zig zag, and never have any trouble with it showing through. I also use smaller pieces for little projects like bags or hotpads. I store all my scraps and strips of batting rolled up in a big zippered floor-pillow case. It's an ok pillow on a daybed, it stays clean and relatively smooth, and it's easy to find when I need it.

    RST
    what a great idea! I am going to do that!

  22. #22
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Prescott Valley, AZ
    Posts
    1,329
    I never buy batting smaller than queen size. I find that is the best value for the money, and I can get several small projects from one batt. Any smaller pieces I save to sandwich practice pieces for fmq, or stuff toys and pillows.

  23. #23
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    99
    i save mine and do pillows and baby quilts with my extra or potholder

  24. #24
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Central MN
    Posts
    260
    Quote Originally Posted by Peggi
    I went into the website for the tape, ordered 3 rolls, my zig-zag always puckers & this looks like the cat's meow!!
    Yes, I have trouble too with it puckering so I had gone to hand-stitching it together (& I hate hand work!) but now I have found that tape and I love it. I would like to be able to figure out what I am doing wrong so I could stitch it. It would be more economical. Peggi, where did you order it from?

  25. #25
    Super Member featherweight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Westminster, Co
    Posts
    2,701
    Quote Originally Posted by erstan947
    I butt the two edges together and zigzag to join
    Same thing I do. Works great for me!!

Page 1 of 3 1 2 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.