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Thread: Beginner quilt

  1. #26
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
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    I think it depends on the width of the logs in the log cabin. I use 1/2 inch to 1 inch logs (finished), and I don't think that's the best quilt to start on, because there are lots of patches in each block, and the 1/4 inch seam is very important. I would recommend a quilt with simpler blocks for a beginner - something like D9P, rail fence, YBR, warm wishes. Or - make one of the simpler log cabins, with wider logs and fewer pieces in each block.

  2. #27
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    My first quilt was a nine patch. I did it all by hand from start to end, mostly because I didn't have a machine and could not wait to start. It IS time consuming, but now that I have a machine it seems to be just a bit less satisfying for me to use it, Does that make any sense at all?? LOL
    David

  3. #28
    RST
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    Senior Member RST's Avatar
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    I would suggest that you start with a log cabin pillow or table runner -- maybe 4 or nine patches. See how you like the process, and have something you can finish up relatively quickly. Then, if you love it, you are well equipped to go on to making the full quilt.

    Log cabins are one of my favorites, and one of the few patterns I've made repeatedly, because they offer so much creative possibility. But they can be frustrating to make, specially for a beginner working on your own.

    RST

  4. #29
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    ABSOLUTELY ENJOY THE PROCESS.

  5. #30
    Super Member Iluv2quilt's Avatar
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    Log Cabin was my first pattern to use. They are very simple to make, just keep your 1/4" seam accurate and you'll have some beautiful blocks. Very versatile, good luck!

  6. #31
    Super Member Wunder-Mar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by incoming2me
    Eleanor Burns has a great "Quilt in a Day" book on Log Cabins.
    I'd definitely recommend it for anyone!
    My first quilting class was for a log cabin quilt and learned the "old fashioned" method of cutting piles and piles of different length strips to sew together.

    Then I bought Eleanor Burns' book on Log Cabins, and her method accomplished the same (better!) results with a lot less cutting and stacking heartburn. I strongly recommend buying one of her log cabin quilt books because you not only learn the simpler method, BUT Eleanor generously shows different layouts for different sized log cabin quilts just to show you how versatile this easy block is and how to achieve different looks just from layout choice alone. As far as quilting books go - and face it, they're expensive! starting out - you get a tremendous bang for your buck with this book.

    I'd also a very vocal advocate for beginner's to check out book on Amazon.com and THEN - before ordering anything - go to their local library and request those books through interlibrary loan. It costs nothing, you can really examine and test the book BEFORE laying out any purchase money.

  7. #32
    Senior Member Pieceful Quilter's Avatar
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    Lots of good advice here already. I also like Marti Mitchell's book "Log Cabin ABC's"

  8. #33
    Super Member karate lady's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by layhewmonica
    Would the Log Cabin quilt be a quilt for a beginner? I've never quilted but they look so pretty. And when someone says they hand quilted does that mean they didn't use a sewing machine at all?
    I am a beginner and for my first quilt where I actually cut and piece I am doing a beginners rail fence. It only has three different fabrics and is done in strips. Got the strips cut and am not putting them together. wish me luck. smile

  9. #34
    Super Member karate lady's Avatar
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    I mean I am now putting them together. smile senior moment there....

  10. #35
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    I hand quilt and everything is hand done, my choice. My first quilt was a log cabin simple and beautiful. I will be doing more because I love the way they go together.
    Mia

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by incoming2me
    Eleanor Burns has a great "Quilt in a Day" book on Log Cabins.
    I'd definitely recommend it for anyone!
    I would recommend it also. I have the book and love it. There are so many variables of the log cabin in her book. I have made several log cabins using her book and love doing them. She makes them so easy. Hobby Lobby usually carries this book.

  12. #37
    Super Member biscuitqueen's Avatar
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    I've made 3 log cabins back to back, they get better each time, I square up every time around, and make sure you get a 1/4 inch foot it really helps. I couoldn't wrap my mind around the light and dark when I did my 1st one, but I did all of mine scrappy. Huge difference when not repeating colors.

  13. #38
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    My first quilt was a log cabin quilt with a flannel backing. I have it on my chair and love to snuggle in it when it is cold.

  14. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by layhewmonica
    Would the Log Cabin quilt be a quilt for a beginner? I've never quilted but they look so pretty. And when someone says they hand quilted does that mean they didn't use a sewing machine at all?
    It was my very first one I made. I had to tie it though.

  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by karate lady
    I mean I am now putting them
    together. smile senior moment there....
    Dear Karate lady, is this a beggining quilt?

    I love rail fences!
    Here is a hint - get a picture of one to use as a guide.
    To keep the rows from going wonky - or getting mixed up
    try this:
    Strip sew the fabric and cut it into the blocks.
    Try to plan the top to have an even number of blocks across and down.
    Square them all with a square ruler cutting only slivers off.
    Put four blocks together in a square using the picture as a guide.
    Put all the rest of the blocks together in squares of fours and put them in a stack. All the SAME way!
    For uneven numbers of rows across or down, make stacks of fours until you have about two thirds done, and add the rest onto the sewn center.
    For even numbers of rows sew them ALL into fours, and stack them all.
    Now sew the blocks of fours into bigger blocks of fours,
    and those into the quilt top.
    This method of keeping the orientation of the blocks, saves your head from going wierd trying to make the zig-zag come out right!
    Of course by using the picture as a guide you can sew rows too...but it is harder to get perfect corners.

  16. #41
    Super Member karate lady's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jpthequilter
    Quote Originally Posted by karate lady
    I mean I am now putting them
    together. smile senior moment there....
    Dear Karate lady, is this a beggining quilt?

    I love rail fences!
    Here is a hint - get a picture of one to use as a guide.
    To keep the rows from going wonky - or getting mixed up
    try this:
    Strip sew the fabric and cut it into the blocks.
    Try to plan the top to have an even number of blocks across and down.
    Square them all with a square ruler cutting only slivers off.
    Put four blocks together in a square using the picture as a guide.
    Put all the rest of the blocks together in squares of fours and put them in a stack. All the SAME way!
    For uneven numbers of rows across or down, make stacks of fours until you have about two thirds done, and add the rest onto the sewn center.
    For even numbers of rows sew them ALL into fours, and stack them all.
    Now sew the blocks of fours into bigger blocks of fours,
    and those into the quilt top.
    This method of keeping the orientation of the blocks, saves your head from going wierd trying to make the zig-zag come out right!
    Of course by using the picture as a guide you can sew rows too...but it is harder to get perfect corners.
    That gives a zig zag, so could be a little confusing. just go on line and put in beginers rail fence quilt and see what comes up. that's how I found minethis is where I found mine

    www.victorianaquiltdesigns.com/victorianaquilters/patternpage/easybeginnersrail. try that one gives apicture, chart to use and directions. the hints on squaring up in the one you have sound good.

  17. #42
    Super Member tlpa's Avatar
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    My first quilt was a log cabin also. Really enjoyed it.

  18. #43
    Super Member mshawii's Avatar
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    One of the things I did when I started, well after a few and not accurate, was I made a square the size of each round, to make sure that I was making it right. I think I had 3 or 4 rounds. It really kept me correct and also let me fix a spot that wasn't right, before it got worse because the problem just keeps multiplying as you go out. Accuracy is really important. But it is a real easy block. I would suggest doing one first without a lot of rounds. Maybe 3-4 to start. Maybe make some practice ones first without the thought of putting them into a quilt. Make them out of scraps and use them for mug rugs. This is a good way to see that your seams are accurate and that you like doing the pattern. Also if you have a pattern that has the cut size of each log, all the better, because if the next log doesn't fit then something is wrong.

  19. #44
    Super Member karate lady's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by karate lady
    Quote Originally Posted by jpthequilter
    Quote Originally Posted by karate lady
    I mean I am now putting them
    together. smile senior moment there....
    Dear Karate lady, is this a beggining quilt?

    I love rail fences!
    Here is a hint - get a picture of one to use as a guide.
    To keep the rows from going wonky - or getting mixed up
    try this:
    Strip sew the fabric and cut it into the blocks.
    Try to plan the top to have an even number of blocks across and down.
    Square them all with a square ruler cutting only slivers off.
    Put four blocks together in a square using the picture as a guide.
    Put all the rest of the blocks together in squares of fours and put them in a stack. All the SAME way!
    For uneven numbers of rows across or down, make stacks of fours until you have about two thirds done, and add the rest onto the sewn center.
    For even numbers of rows sew them ALL into fours, and stack them all.
    Now sew the blocks of fours into bigger blocks of fours,
    and those into the quilt top.
    This method of keeping the orientation of the blocks, saves your head from going wierd trying to make the zig-zag come out right!
    Of course by using the picture as a guide you can sew rows too...but it is harder to get perfect corners.
    That gives a zig zag, so could be a little confusing. just go on line and put in beginers rail fence quilt and see what comes up. that's how I found minethis is where I found mine

    www.victorianaquiltdesigns.com/victorianaquilters/patternpage/easybeginnersrail. try that one gives apicture, chart to use and directions. the hints on squaring up in the one you have sound good.
    I have most of my first two strips of the beginner rail fence done. Did one strip of all three and then cut the 6 1/2 squares. Looks like it is going to come out really pretty. Give this one a try.

  20. #45
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    Thanks everybody!
    My top is done, except for the borders. It really doesn't matter how you put it together....
    I just found that instead of strips, making fours for some reason keeps the top squarer. (If there is such a word?)
    My current top is screaming shades of orange! It will be the definition of an orange quilt! It started with a tiger lilly print, added a regular bright plain orange, and a red-orange tone on tone print, and a plain yellow orange, so I had 4 strips.
    I think 3 strips make a more zaggy rail fence though.
    I really like to make rail fences.
    I have to confess I have made ONE log cabin years =donkey's years ago! Dunno why they don't interest me much either? Dunno why I made an orange quilt either!
    Jeannie

  21. #46
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    Simple four patches or nine patches are great for beginners. After these are mastered then move on to Log Cabins, pinwheels, DNP's, etc.

  22. #47
    Super Member karate lady's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jpthequilter
    Thanks everybody!
    My top is done, except for the borders. It really doesn't matter how you put it together....
    I just found that instead of strips, making fours for some reason keeps the top squarer. (If there is such a word?)
    My current top is screaming shades of orange! It will be the definition of an orange quilt! It started with a tiger lilly print, added a regular bright plain orange, and a red-orange tone on tone print, and a plain yellow orange, so I had 4 strips.
    I think 3 strips make a more zaggy rail fence though.
    I really like to make rail fences.
    I have to confess I have made ONE log cabin years =donkey's years ago! Dunno why they don't interest me much either? Dunno why I made an orange quilt either!
    Jeannie
    I have orange in the one I ammaking now. smile

  23. #48
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    The secret to learning how to make a log cabin block is to start out with a bigger square for the middle, say 4 inches, then use wider strips, 2 inches in 3 different colors plus the white.

    When you cut the strips, measure the two inches on the length of the fabric you use, then cut your strips selvage to selvage. Do not cut into lengths. Attach as picture indicates, going round the square.

    Good Luck!

    12 inch Log Cabin Block
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  24. #49

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    THANKS SO MUCH FOR SUCH GOOD INFORMATION. I AM JUST A BEGINNER AND IT CAN BE OVERWHELMING WHEN YOU REALIZE ALL THE STEPS THAT GO INTO WHAT WILL BECOME A WORK OF ART. I AM SO AFRAID OF MAKING MISTAKES AND BEING EMBARASSED. I HAVE SEWEN FOR FIFTY PLUS YEARS. THIS IS, HOWEVER, A WHOLE DIFFERENT WORLD AND SET OF RULES. YOU SEASONED QUILTERS MAKE IT SOUND AND LOOK SO EASY.

  25. #50
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    They also do great with paper piecing.

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