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Thread: Best way to hang quilts without sleeves?

  1. #1
    Super Member Pam S's Avatar
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    Best way to hang quilts without sleeves?

    I'm looking for a way to hang large quilts (double/queen) without a sleeve on the back. I have a large blank wall right now that has my flannel design wall nailed to it but want to be able to hang completed quilts on that wall and switch them out when the mood hits me. I've been looking online at all the options but there are so many that I don't know what to buy. Some are a series of small wooden clamps, some are bars that clamp the entire quilt between them. If you're using one of these systems, do you have a favorite type or favorite maker? Are there any you've bought that just didn't work for you? I'd love to hear what you think.

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    Super Member auntpiggylpn's Avatar
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    One of my friends has a decorative rod hanging in her great room that she hangs her quilts on. Instead of a sleeve, she uses drapery rings with the clamp on the bottom.
    Last edited by QuiltnNan; 11-26-2012 at 06:35 AM. Reason: remove copyright image
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  3. #3
    Junior Member An Arm Long's Avatar
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    I used a curtain rod. The kind that has rings on the rod with small metal clothes pins attached. My only concern would be for a light colored quilt with light binding. I have not had any rust or markings but both my quilts were small and dark colors. If I had a light color, I guess I could put fabric under each clothespin to protect the quilt.
    Beth in Maryland

  4. #4
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    If you hang the quilt, then you won't be using your design wall ... therefore you could pin the quilt to the design wall.

    If you are wanting to use the design wall, then a curtain rod with rings would let you slide the quilt out of the way to reveal the design wall.
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    Super Member sewingsuz's Avatar
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    This is an excellant idea/ Thanks.
    Suzanne
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  7. #7
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
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    If it were me, I'd add a sleeve and hang the quilt from a rod mounted above the design wall. But if you don't want a sleeve on the quilt, use a full bar clamp in order to evenly distribute the weight of the quilt so it doesn't stretch.

    I have seen quilts totally ruined because they were hung from separate clamps, clips, rings, etc along the top edge. They can easily wind up with 'scalloped' tops from the stress of uneven pull from hanging...the larger the quilt, the faster it happens. Think about how fast clothes get stretched out on hangers and multiply that by the weight of a bed sized quilt.
    Last edited by ghostrider; 11-26-2012 at 02:23 PM.
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  8. #8
    Super Member Pam S's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by QuiltE View Post
    If you hang the quilt, then you won't be using your design wall ... therefore you could pin the quilt to the design wall.

    If you are wanting to use the design wall, then a curtain rod with rings would let you slide the quilt out of the way to reveal the design wall.
    Forgot to say that I won't be needing this wall for a design wall. I rearranged my sewing room and made space there for the design wall. This wall is in my finished basement across from the LA.

    I'm really thinking, that because I want to hang larger quilts, that the long clamp type would be better to keep them from stretching since the weight is evenly distributed. But I was wondering if anyone has used this kind and what they think of them. They're not cheap and I don't to make an expensive mistake.
    Last edited by Pam S; 11-26-2012 at 02:28 PM.

  9. #9
    Super Member AliKat's Avatar
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    I put up a long curtain rod in my room. Then I ended up using what are skirt grip hangers that were black plastic. I then looped black grossgtrain type tape throught the openings so the quilt would hang properly. I thought of those curtain rings but they are metal and I was thinking they could damage the quilt by making holes or whatever.

    Look at your LQS's and see how they display their quilts and you will get more ideas.

    ali
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  10. #10
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    I've seen quilts that had triangles sewn across the top 2 corners, then a dowel was inserted under the triangles, then the dowel rests on top of 2 Command Adhesive hooks. If you have a larger quilt, you could use more hooks.

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    Have read about a device called Hang It Dang It. Haven't used It but seems like an easy way to hang them. Search for it on this board as has been discussed before.

  12. #12
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
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    What is your objection to adding a sleeve? Just curious.
    The Earth without art is just "Eh".

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    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
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    I saw a really nice quilt hanging unit that uses two powerful bars of magnets to hold the quilt. I just can't remember the name, but it was quite nicely made and made changing a quilt very easy.
    I just found one similiar its called "easy display".

    Here is another
    http://www.artinapinch.net/original_quilt_hanger.html
    Last edited by Lori S; 11-26-2012 at 07:03 PM.

  14. #14
    Super Member Pam S's Avatar
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    Thanks, Lori, your link is one of the hangers I'm considering.

  15. #15
    Super Member Pam S's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghostrider View Post
    What is your objection to adding a sleeve? Just curious.
    These are quilts I use and, when they're not in use, I'd like to display them. I don't like sleeves on my bed quilts, personal preference. And I have a few of my grandmother's quilts that I might like to put up occasionally. Since they're not going to be permanently hung, I don't want to add sleeves.

  16. #16
    Super Member Crqltr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pam S View Post
    Forgot to say that I won't be needing this wall for a design wall. I rearranged my sewing room and made space there for the design wall. This wall is in my finished basement across from the LA.

    I'm really thinking, that because I want to hang larger quilts, that the long clamp type would be better to keep them from stretching since the weight is evenly distributed. But I was wondering if anyone has used this kind and what they think of them. They're not cheap and I don't to make an expensive mistake.
    I have one with the squeeze bar type system! Or the long bar clamp style, not sure what the correct term is. The board strips squeeze together with wooden knobs that you turn to tighten. It is only wall hanging size tho. I love the way they look and they are pretty easy to hang. I bought mine from a Amish store in Lancaster, it was home made and the price was very reasonable.
    Last edited by Crqltr; 11-26-2012 at 08:32 PM.

  17. #17
    Senior Member luvstoquilt301's Avatar
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    I have used those big pushpins. They leave VERY small holes. After renting this house for 11 years, we are moving. I used those command strips and they pull off part of the wall...YUCK. I used a rod with them. Next house I will stich with pushpins.

  18. #18
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    I mounted a large wooden curtain pole above my bed. It has a quilt folded over it. I can change it easily. Also could fold several for a dIfferent look. Or layer them. Being so easy to change is good as I will not be tempted to leave one there long enough to be damaged. Years ago I tacked velcro to the wall and whipped the other side to the end of the quilt and held it to the wall that way.

  19. #19
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    I would go to the time and trouble of attaching the sleeve. Using clamps may cause permanent damage to your quilts. I automatically prepare a hanging sleeve on all my quilts. If the recipient doesn't want the sleeve, they can remove it.

  20. #20
    Super Member coopah's Avatar
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    Good points, Ghostrider.
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  21. #21
    Senior Member canuckninepatch's Avatar
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    I agree with you, Ghostrider. I would be very cautious about hanging a finished quilt by clips. If you use a longer stitch when sewing on the sleeves, they can be taken off quite easily by Jack (the ripper :-) And the sleeves can be reused. My sister bought one of those new hanging systems with magnets (it wasn't cheap!) and the quilt kept ending up on the floor. I say "go old school!

    QUOTE=ghostrider;5681460]If it were me, I'd add a sleeve and hang the quilt from a rod mounted above the design wall. But if you don't want a sleeve on the quilt, use a full bar clamp in order to evenly distribute the weight of the quilt so it doesn't stretch.

    I have seen quilts totally ruined because they were hung from separate clamps, clips, rings, etc along the top edge. They can easily wind up with 'scalloped' tops from the stress of uneven pull from hanging...the larger the quilt, the faster it happens. Think about how fast clothes get stretched out on hangers and multiply that by the weight of a bed sized quilt. [/QUOTE]
    C9P aka Jan

  22. #22
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    Why not use a slwwve? If the quilt is going to hang in your sewing room, I would prefer the even weight distribution of a curtain rod supported by decorative holders rather than something that bites into the quilt. I rotate my quilts using a long curtain rod and have had no damage.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by auntpiggylpn View Post
    One of my friends has a decorative rod hanging in her great room that she hangs her quilts on. Instead of a sleeve, she uses drapery rings with the clamp on the bottom.
    This is what I have done as well. There are some beautiful curtain rods out there and they don't cost an arm and a leg.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghostrider View Post
    If it were me, I'd add a sleeve and hang the quilt from a rod mounted above the design wall. But if you don't want a sleeve on the quilt, use a full bar clamp in order to evenly distribute the weight of the quilt so it doesn't stretch.

    I have seen quilts totally ruined because they were hung from separate clamps, clips, rings, etc along the top edge. They can easily wind up with 'scalloped' tops from the stress of uneven pull from hanging...the larger the quilt, the faster it happens. Think about how fast clothes get stretched out on hangers and multiply that by the weight of a bed sized quilt.
    I agree. It's important to keep the weight evenly distributed to avoid those sags. Learned this one the hard way....
    -Chris-
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  25. #25
    Super Member applique's Avatar
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    You could mount one metal strip to the wall (just be sure the strips attract magnets) Add as many rare earth magnets as needed. They are very strong magnets available online in different sizes and strengths (don't use if you have a pacemaker)! Wrap the top of the quilt over a second metal bar and put up over the magnets.
    Debbie
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