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Thread: Clothing from quilting cotton..is it ok?

  1. #1
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    Clothing from quilting cotton..is it ok?

    I really want to make some children's clothing and the cotton prints are very cute but now I have reservations about using them. I have been reading a lot about not using quilting cotton to sew clothing. Are there any particular reasons for not using quilting cotton for sewing clothing?
    Thanks
    Kim

  2. #2
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    I know of no reason why quilting fabric can not be used for clothing! The only issue that I see is that since it is 100% cotton then it may be wrinkled after washing and need to be ironed! UGH!!!! who likes to iron!

  3. #3
    Super Member DebraK's Avatar
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    I don't see why not. Just remove from the dryer immediately to avoid wrinkles.
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  4. #4
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    I wear blouses made from "quilting cotton" all the time ---you can't find the poly/cotton blend anymore that I used for years---I do a lot of ironing tho. Bounce Ironing Spray is wonderful for taking out wrinkles tho---one little spray and they are gone !!!!

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    I make pajama sets for me from quilting cottons all the time! Can't beat the crazy novelty fabrics and some of the florals are just out of this world!! My LQS has some store samples of little girls dresses hanging in the store. I was in there one day and a lady came in that makes boutique childrens clothing on etsy.com and she bought lots of quilting cottons. (She gets $35-45 for a dress that wasn't fancy at all. It was the fabrics that drive her prices!)
    Last edited by auntpiggylpn; 08-06-2012 at 06:45 AM.
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    That's what we used to 'live in' - feed, flour, and sugar sacks were made of cotton!

    I'm still not sure why 'not suitable for children's clothing' is stamped on some selvages of smooth, woven cottons.

  7. #7
    Super Member clsurz's Avatar
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    Not trying to me mean or ugly here but that has got to be the stupidest thing I've ever heard. Many of us use all types of cotton for sewing and quilting. Cotton is one of the most manageable materials out there. I just make sure to prewash my cotton fabrics before sewing and/or quilting with it.

    Yes, you can use quilting cotton as apparel fabric. The main thing to remember is that quilting cotton tends to be stiffer than apparel cotton. It isn’t particularly soft and has a stiff drape. It works best when made into structured garments. The fabric is sturdy and holds up through many washings. In general, quilting cotton makes very casual garments and is utterly adorable when made into simple little girl dresses. You’ll find that sewing with this fabric is incredibly easy. It’s easy to cut, doesn’t slip and slide, it holds a crease and irons nicely. See why it’s popular with quilters and sewers alike?

    Whoever is passing that information on that you can't use quilting fabric to sew clothes with knows jack about fabrics IMHO.

    Personally I can't wear clothing that has a blend in it and has to be 100% cotton and everyone around here that I know of uses what is coined I suppose as quilting cotton fabric to make clothes as well.
    clsurz

  8. #8
    Super Member KalamaQuilts's Avatar
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    from above: "I'm still not sure why 'not suitable for children's clothing' is stamped on some selvages of smooth, woven cottons."

    They aren't fire retardant.

    I made a couple sets of pillow cases from my stash and wasn't crazy about them. With lots of washing they have a tendency to look not so bright, and of course always need pressed (for me anyway)

    I'm going to look for some kind of polycotton mix in the regular fabric stores next time I need something.

    Daisy Kingdom pretty much based their marketing on how well their fabrics suited children's clothing.

  9. #9
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    My clothes are made with 100% cotton, any kind. I always wash any fabric first before I use it.
    http://www.oregonquilting.net
    I choose to give my life away for things that last forever

  10. #10
    Super Member clsurz's Avatar
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    I also meant to say that I remove my cotton clothing from the dryer as soon as its done and hang it and smooth it down to prevent wrinkles.

    Shoot I can remember my mother making our clothes out of those flour cotton sacks more than half a century ago and it wore well.
    clsurz

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    I think the salvage stamp has to do with fire retardency, but I would rather not have some chemical fire retardent put on the clothes the kids/ grandkids are wearing anyway!

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    Super Member Deborahlees's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bearisgray View Post
    That's what we used to 'live in' - feed, flour, and sugar sacks were made of cotton!

    I'm still not sure why 'not suitable for children's clothing' is stamped on some selvages of smooth, woven cottons.
    I think this could have something to do with the flamability issue for childrens sleepware.....somewhere I think there
    is a law to protect children in their pj's......
    Yes that is a real picture of my hometown Temecula, California. We feature premiere Wineries, World Class Golf Courses, Pechanga Indian Casino and Hot Air Balloons

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    Super Member Candace's Avatar
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    The only thing that would keep me from making clothing out of quilting fabric is the cost! I made a jumper from batik once and yes, it was cute, but it cost me a fortune.

  14. #14
    Super Member Neesie's Avatar
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    I've made clothing from "quilting" cotton, for years. It's sooooo comfy!!! Just make sure you pre-wash, so that you don't end up with a wonky garment!
    Neesie


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    Super Member GrannieAnnie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kjohnson0523 View Post
    I really want to make some children's clothing and the cotton prints are very cute but now I have reservations about using them. I have been reading a lot about not using quilting cotton to sew clothing. Are there any particular reasons for not using quilting cotton for sewing clothing?
    Thanks
    Kim
    Cotton is cotton. Look in another store and you might very well find "quilting" cotton among the regular cottons.
    Bad Spellers of the World
    U N T I E

  16. #16
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    I also think the term 'quilting cotton' is so --------- (annoyed scream here) limiting!!!!
    Last edited by bearisgray; 08-06-2012 at 07:39 AM.

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    THANKS!! I appreciate your input. I really wanted to use some of the cute fabrics but like I said, after I did an online search, there is a lot of information about not using it. I am going to give it a try, some of those prints are too cute to pass up.
    Kim

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    Go for it, nothing is better to put on than clean crisp cotton.
    groovey

  19. #19
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    At last count I had made more than 50 scrub tops for my daughter from quilting cottons. The brightness fades a little but they wear well.

  20. #20
    Super Member huntannette's Avatar
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    I`ve made many dresses with quilting cotton and thy are absolutely wonderfull.....so many beautiful colors and patterns....and thy stay like new after many washings....no problems at all...just more expensive than poly/cotton...just take them out of dryer before thy are completely dry....

  21. #21
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    I've noticed some cottons wrinkle very little - and others are almost worse than linens for rumpling.

    I use the scrunch test when I buy fabrics - I grab a handful of it and scrunch it up hard in my hand - then release it and see how well it does - or doesn't - release wrinkles.

  22. #22
    Senior Member IAmCatOwned's Avatar
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    There are only 2 reasons for not using quilting fabric for clothing. One - you hate ironing. Most cotton clothing needs pressing. If you avoid styles that use collars and long sleeves, probably not a problem. My Mom can't stand to see me in an unpressed apron, but it doesn't bother me in the least bit. The second reason, as others have stated, are children's nightwear. The problem is not the cotton, but the design of the clothing. If you design the child's clothing to be body hugging with no frills, you make it safer.

    Most flame retardants in children's nightwear washes out after 10-15 washings. It is the styling that reduced the number of burning injuries more than the fabric change. In most states, however, you cannot sell children's nightwear that you have made unless you use the stuff made specifically for children's nightwear (all poly). Way better choice than letting the kid sleep in oversized T-shirts (which are responsible for many burns today).

  23. #23
    Senior Member IAmCatOwned's Avatar
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    There are only 2 reasons for not using quilting fabric for clothing. One - you hate ironing. Most cotton clothing needs pressing. If you avoid styles that use collars and long sleeves, probably not a problem. My Mom can't stand to see me in an unpressed apron, but it doesn't bother me in the least bit. The second reason, as others have stated, are children's nightwear. The problem is not the cotton, but the design of the clothing. If you design the child's clothing to be body hugging with no frills, you make it safer.

    Most flame retardants in children's nightwear washes out after 10-15 washings. It is the styling that reduced the number of burning injuries more than the fabric change. In most states, however, you cannot sell children's nightwear that you have made unless you use the stuff made specifically for children's nightwear (all poly). Way better choice than letting the kid sleep in oversized T-shirts (which are responsible for many burns today).

    I am in the process of making some capris from quilting cotton. A couple of sewers have recommended using fabric or interfacing reinforcement for certain types of pockets because of their tendency to tear in thinner cotton fabric. I've decided to change my pocket style to one they use in men's bermuda shorts (it ends up in the waistband) to avoid that problem.

  24. #24
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    most of the novelty prints you see are on 100% cotton. I made jumpers/skirts from them for my own DDs years ago. now I make them for GD. Down side is the wrinkling, but if you are aware you can minimize wrinkles by taking it right out the dryer and hanging up.

  25. #25
    Super Member Neesie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bearisgray View Post
    I've noticed some cottons wrinkle very little - and others are almost worse than linens for rumpling.

    I use the scrunch test when I buy fabrics - I grab a handful of it and scrunch it up hard in my hand - then release it and see how well it does - or doesn't - release wrinkles.
    Now the Fabric Police will know why so many bolts of fabric have crumpled corners!
    I verrrrry discreetly scrunch it, with my fingers.
    Neesie


    By all means let's be open-minded, but not so open-minded that our brains drop out.
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