Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 29

Thread: Cost of 100 x 100 String Quilt

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    11

    Cost of 100 x 100 String Quilt

    Just a pricing question. What would you charge for string quilt 100x100. I am making from start to finish. Any suggestions would be very helpful

  2. #2
    Power Poster PaperPrincess's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    11,159
    Blog Entries
    2
    I would charge at least $1,000. first of all, you are going to have at least $250 in materials for the top, back, batting and thread. Even if you are using scraps, you paid $11/yard for the fabric in the first place. the cost to quilt, even with a basic panto is going to be around $200, to bind it about $50. So now you are up to $500. Then you have to piece it. Lets say you are making 10" squares and it takes a half hour to piece one (remember to include the time it takes to press, then join). That's 100 squares, or 50 hours. I hope you feel your skills are worth a minimum of $10/hour, or $500. There you have it. $1,000
    "I do not understand how anyone can live without one small place of enchantment to turn to."
    Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings

  3. #3
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    34,891
    I quilt because I love it so I am not concerned about how undervalued it is. The value is in the doing!
    If someone want to pay you to make a quilt, at least get the supply money up front.

  4. #4
    Senior Member nvb50's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Kankakee County in Illinois
    Posts
    487
    I charge 3 times the amount of all supplies.

  5. #5
    Power Poster Boston1954's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    East Oklahoma - pining for Massachusetts
    Posts
    10,447
    Will it be hand or machine quilted?
    Life is not a movie. No one is going to yell "CUT" when you make a mistake. - Anne L. Fulton

    I am from the South....39 miles south of Boston.

  6. #6
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Outside St. Louis
    Posts
    33,730
    Most people I hope don't buy 11.00 a yard for fabrics. I know I don't and never will. I don't make quilts for money. I make most quilts now for donation. Pleasure is in making them and knowing they will keep a foster child warm.
    Another Phyllis
    This life is the only one you get - enjoy it before you lose it.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    NW Kansas
    Posts
    451
    I agree with PaperPrinces 100%. I love to quilt, but when someone wants something special, unless it is family, I would definitely charge for it, or the word will get around and you will be quilting for others for basically for nothing. JMHO

  8. #8
    Super Member cashs_mom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    5,940
    Quote Originally Posted by P-BurgKay View Post
    I agree with PaperPrinces 100%. I love to quilt, but when someone wants something special, unless it is family, I would definitely charge for it, or the word will get around and you will be quilting for others for basically for nothing. JMHO
    I totally agree. And I do pay $11.00 a yard for fabric if it's good quality and something I want. I hate working with poor quality fabrics and buy what I want to work with.
    Patrice S

    Bernina Artista 180, Singer 301a, Featherweight Centennial, Rocketeer, Juki 2200 QVP Mini, White 1964 Featherweight

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Valley of the sun, AZ
    Posts
    987
    Quote Originally Posted by cashs_mom View Post
    I totally agree. And I do pay $11.00 a yard for fabric if it's good quality and something I want. I hate working with poor quality fabrics and buy what I want to work with.
    I agree with the above! and with P-Burgkay. Way to go Paper Princess for figuring the cost! Save that for future requests for how much to charge!!! sew for who you want and don't charge, or charge whatever you want but I wouldn't. Otherwise, I would never get back to sewing what I want.

  10. #10
    Super Member ArtsyOne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Canadian in Minnesota
    Posts
    3,062
    I've found that when I make quilts because I want to give them or donate them I really enjoy the process. When I've made quilts that someone has asked me to make, then I fight every step of the way - the seams don't want to match, the colors don't go together, the quilting is difficult, I can't decide on a backing fabric, etc. etc. If I'm going to battle a quilt all the way through, then they better pay me a ton of money.
    A fabric stash is always missing that one fabric needed to finish the quilt on which you're working.

  11. #11
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Posts
    11,904
    Blog Entries
    1
    $1,000-$1,500. With a 50% deposit with balance due upon completion.
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

  12. #12
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Posts
    11,904
    Blog Entries
    1
    I visited my favorite little local shop yesterday, first time in a few months. I found about 95% of their fabrics were now $12.50 a yard, they did have a few that were $10.50 & $11. I purchased what I needed for the current commission I’m working on.
    Good thing I’m serious about my ( fabric moratorium) there won’t be any * shopping sprees * in my near future.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jingle View Post
    Most people I hope don't buy 11.00 a yard for fabrics. I know I don't and never will. I don't make quilts for money. I make most quilts now for donation. Pleasure is in making them and knowing they will keep a foster child warm.
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

  13. #13
    Super Member coopah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Horse Country, FL
    Posts
    7,179
    Blog Entries
    1
    Yes to charging what your time is worth and for the supplies. Good points already made.
    I am fortunate to be able to use my stash and am seriously attacking that stash before buying. One quilt shop that I frequent has a 1/2 off room...and I've lucked out on finding just what was needed. Most of my quilts are for friends and family. The charity quilts are usually made from "leftovers" or else donations that people place on the free table at our guild.
    "A woman is like a tea bag-you can't tell how strong she is until you put her in hot water." Eleanor Roosevelt

  14. #14
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    1,672
    Blog Entries
    1
    You can not sell your quilts and recoup costs if you buy retail - period. The only way some of us make money at all is that we NEVER buy retail, for fabric, batting, etc. And, almost always, it needs to be a throw or lap size quilt in a fairly simple pattern so the time involved is lower. If you buy retail, make big and do a complex pattern, just ask whatever and think of it as gifting the rest. (As an example, I buy batting wholesale and only when they have a deal happening and pay less than $4 per yard for fabric and I quilt it myself. This is the only way to make a profit and then it is not a big profit.)

  15. #15
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Belen, NM
    Posts
    1,309
    Quilting is NOT a high-profit business for the quilters. The notions and fabric companies mostly benefit. Quilting IMHO is an art form that offers personal satisfaction on a myriad of layers. If you need to make a profit from it, you might want to focus on small, unique items that can be made quicker and can be sold easily (tote bags, pillows, quilted luggage, etc). I do sell my quilts sometimes but only to further finance this wonderful hobby of mine and keep the quilts from stacking up in my storage space.
    "The great doing of little things makes the great life." Eugena Price

  16. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    873
    Quote Originally Posted by ArtsyOne View Post
    I've found that when I make quilts because I want to give them or donate them I really enjoy the process. When I've made quilts that someone has asked me to make, then I fight every step of the way - the seams don't want to match, the colors don't go together, the quilting is difficult, I can't decide on a backing fabric, etc. etc. If I'm going to battle a quilt all the way through, then they better pay me a ton of money.
    I know what you mean exactly. I had a part-time quilting business and found that when I was quilting for a customer I swear, I had more problems with everything(tension, etc). On my own quilts I hardly ever have those problems. I finally decided I was putting too much pressure on myself that lead to many errors so stopped the business. Wasn't worth it to me in the long run.
    I'm hoping the pressure was because of their expectations and the pressure of performing for pay. I have a quilt coming up that has been requested by a family member but don't think I'll experience that pressure.
    Sally

  17. #17
    Super Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    NE Pa.
    Posts
    1,680
    Making quilts for sale is just not a profitable business . Cost of fabric it at least $10. and up a yd. I do buy my fabric at quilt shops. So most of my quilts are gifted to family and close friends. Its my go to hobby and no matter what hobby you have it costs money. I don't bowl, fish, hunt play golf, smoke or drink. LOLOLOL So my money goes into fabric.

  18. #18
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    11
    Thanks everyone for your advice. I will be charging only 400.00 and the rest charity I guess. You never get paid for what it is worth. One good thing it it helping me get rid of scraps. It will be machine quilted by myself. You will never get rich that is for sure. It seems our time is free. Most of my quilts are gifted to family and our church auction.

  19. #19
    Super Member Fabric Galore's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Central FL
    Posts
    1,061
    Blog Entries
    3
    I am kept busy making quilts for my family with weddings, babies, graduation, etc. I don't think I would make a quilt for someone who wanted to pay me. My mother loved to crochet and she made a beautiful table cloth for a friend. When the table cloth was finished the friend asked my mother to enlarge it. No words of thank you or appreciation. The same goes for knitting. Another friend charges 3 times the cost of materials and her customer went out and bought yarn on sale for $.99 and expected to pay $5.00 for a sweater. An easy way to lose a friend.

  20. #20
    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    home again, after 27 yrs!
    Posts
    18,401
    Blog Entries
    2
    I want to meet these people who would pay $1,000 for a quilt. I quilt and can't even see that. I know, i'm not one who could afford to do that.

  21. #21
    Super Member PamelaOry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Philomath, Oregon
    Posts
    1,559
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by nativetexan View Post
    I want to meet these people who would pay $1,000 for a quilt. I quilt and can't even see that. I know, i'm not one who could afford to do that.
    i started quilting because I love quilts but could never afford to buy one. Oh the irony of it.....I’ve spent far more on quilting supplies than one big beautiful quilt would have cost.

  22. #22
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    1,508
    Blog Entries
    2
    Quilt - 100 x 100 (Quilting it at 0.18% = $180.00 / 0.20% = $200.00 )
    Making and attach binding = $53.00 @ 0.13 per inch
    hand stitching to back of quilt = $80.00 @ .20 per inch

    Plush the cost of fabric , batting and your time making it. hope this helps

  23. #23
    Power Poster Onebyone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Southern USA
    Posts
    10,456
    Charging a too low price is too common with quilters with good quilting skills. I decide what would be a good price and then double it when someone asks me if I will sell one of my quilts. I won't make one to custom order. I make what I want and then say yes it's for sale or not.
    I believe giving what I can will never cause me to be in need.
    Being cheap is not a badge of honor.
    My heroes are working people, paying their own way, taking care of their children and being decent human beings.

  24. #24
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    NW Ohio
    Posts
    496
    Blog Entries
    1
    to Native Texan: I live in Amish/Mennonite Midwest, and their quilts are rarely listed less than $1000. Keepsake quilting has a room with finished quilts, and some of those are listed at upwards of $2000. I have never personally sold a quilt, but if someone really wants a quilt, they will pay the fair price. If they don't want to pay for it, then that's up to them, but I wouldn't make one for the cost of a "store-bought" quilt.
    Most of them aren't even made in the US.I went to Tennessee last year, and looked at some of the quilts in a little market. Their prices were in the $400-600 range, and their labels said Made in China. I complained to the manager, and said hat it was a shame that Chinese quilts are being sold as authentic homemade quilts, in the middle of Appalachia. She said that somebody deserves to be paid for their work, so it might as well be the Chinese, since American quilts are too expensive to make.

  25. #25
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    New Mexico, but moving to WI in the spring
    Posts
    117
    A coworker asked for my help, as she wanted to make a quilt for her sister in law. I spent considerable time helping her find the fabric she wanted to use as a focus fabric, sketched out several patterns that would work to showcase it, etc. We tried to get together several times but she was busy, her kids were sick, or something similar every time.

    Finally, she asked me if I’d be interested in making it for her. Considering the time I”ve already put in, I strongly considered it. But I’m just not interested in doing it, and didn’t feel I could charge more than a couple hundred dollars (it’s a simple pattern, because I designed it for her as a beginner). I’m still working, have my own projects and other hobbies, so I finally suggested she look on bulletin boards at quilt stores or fabric stores to see if she could find someone who does this for $.

    It’s hard for me, but as I get older I am finally learning how to say “No” sometimes!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.