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Thread: Crayola crayons

  1. #1
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    Crayola crayons

    hi
    have a question I was wondering about when you draw a picture on a quilt block and then color it with crayons. I know you have to heat set it. But how does it hold up when you wash it. kids quilts have to be wash a lot. Do you use a sealer or something. I found a nice picture I would like to use for a quilt
    panel for my 8 month old grandson but Was wondering how well the coloring hold up durning
    washings. Any one who has made a quilt block like this, I would like to hear from you on the way you
    did it. Also if you have used colored pencil how did you do it and which is the best to use. I have seen
    the thread on this but washing is never discussed. thank you for all your help. Love this board and the people here
    Hello my name is Delilah.
    I like to quilt, Sew, garden and cook.
    I use a vintage Kenmore 15813450 8 stitch sewing machine.
    I call her "Little Girl".

  2. #2
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    If you use crayons, Crayola seem to be the best because they have a strong color. Make sure you back the cotton with freezer paper as a stabilizer. Also, plain solid cotton is the best. White on white fabric does not take the color evenly.

    You iron off the wax by layering the block between paper towels. I try to put brown packing paper down so I don't mess up the ironing board. Once the wax is off you can tell if the color is strong enough. If not, color over it again and iron off the wax until you have the right color saturation. If you wash it with Deft or Woolite, it should hold up.

    When using color pencils, I recommend using a fabric medium instead of water.

    Why don't you make a small practice piece with both methods and run it through the washer a few times?

  3. #3
    Super Member thimblebug6000's Avatar
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    Crabapplehillstudio has this little blurb on their site:
    " Crayon Tinting Instructions

    Some of the patterns are tinted with Crayola Crayons. It's a really fun technique that looks SO COOL when it's done right!!! I like to start the process by coloring any area that's going to be tinted with white crayon. It sort of "fills" the weave of the fabric and smooths it out to create a base for the colored crayons. It also helps with the blending of colors......SO!!! You can go through quite a bit of white crayon in a single project. In "Calendula Patterdrip's Cottage" I used almost 3 white crayons. Having to buy another ENTIRE box of colored crayons just to get one, single, lousy white crayon is just, well... maddening! But...having a little box of all white on hand...is...happy-ing! Yes, that's a new word.

    Color tinting is really easy...

    Trace the design onto the fabric as usual
    Make sure your work surface is clean and smooth and there isn't any lint/threads on the back of the fabric
    Color all areas that you'll be tinting totally, but not heavily, with white crayon
    Tint all areas as directed in the pattern (or use you own imagination!) I like to use a little circular motion
    If you've made any mistakes in coloring, now is the time to fix them! After they're heat set it's too late!
    One way to remove color is by dabbing with removable mounting putty such as Loctite Fun-Tak (the stuff you use to temporarily put posters on the wall)
    Heat set with a hot iron by laying a white paper towel over the tinted area and pressing (you'll smell the wax). Remove the paper towel and look at it... if there's ANY color on it repeat the pressing process with a clean paper towel.



    Crayon Tinted Fabric Washing Instructions

    The crayon tinting embroidery method has existed since the 1930s or 40s and some things have survived, such as aprons and tea towels, with some fading. However, since this is an embroidered quilt and since we can't be absolutely sure about about new stain fighting soap formulas, the best thing to do is treat it like the very delicate hand-made quilt that it is, by using Woolite and washing with cold water on the delicate cycle or by hand washing. For example, if your child accidentally were to get crayon on their shirt, you'd probably never get it out, but Murphy's law being what it is, if it's going to come out of something, it will come out of the quilt. So be careful! "

  4. #4
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    thimblebug6000, Thank you so much for this information. Crayon tinting is something I want to do some day.
    Sally

  5. #5
    IQ2
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    D.Rickman posted a tutorial on coloring on fabric with Crayola crayons:
    https://www.quiltingboard.com/tutori...s-t290518.html

  6. #6
    Super Member crafty pat's Avatar
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    My Mother made one when I was very young of all the state birds. It stayed beautiful until it wore out years later.

  7. #7
    Power Poster Onebyone's Avatar
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    My guild did a Crayon coloring block quilt for a raffle and I won it. It has been washed and dried many times and it looks great. I use it as a utility quilt and am really surprised at how nice the coloring looks after all this time.
    I believe giving what I can will never cause me to be in need.
    Being cheap is not a badge of honor.
    My heroes are working people, paying their own way, taking care of their children and being decent human beings.

  8. #8
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    white crayons

    Quote Originally Posted by thimblebug6000 View Post
    Crabapplehillstudio has this little blurb on their site:
    " Crayon Tinting Instructions

    Some of the patterns are tinted with Crayola Crayons. It's a really fun technique that looks SO COOL when it's done right!!! I like to start the process by coloring any area that's going to be tinted with white crayon. It sort of "fills" the weave of the fabric and smooths it out to create a base for the colored crayons. It also helps with the blending of colors......SO!!! You can go through quite a bit of white crayon in a single project. In "Calendula Patterdrip's Cottage" I used almost 3 white crayons. Having to buy another ENTIRE box of colored crayons just to get one, single, lousy white crayon is just, well... maddening! But...having a little box of all white on hand...is...happy-ing! Yes, that's a new word.

    Color tinting is really easy...

    Trace the design onto the fabric as usual
    Make sure your work surface is clean and smooth and there isn't any lint/threads on the back of the fabric
    Color all areas that you'll be tinting totally, but not heavily, with white crayon
    Tint all areas as directed in the pattern (or use you own imagination!) I like to use a little circular motion
    If you've made any mistakes in coloring, now is the time to fix them! After they're heat set it's too late!
    One way to remove color is by dabbing with removable mounting putty such as Loctite Fun-Tak (the stuff you use to temporarily put posters on the wall)
    Heat set with a hot iron by laying a white paper towel over the tinted area and pressing (you'll smell the wax). Remove the paper towel and look at it... if there's ANY color on it repeat the pressing process with a clean paper towel.



    Crayon Tinted Fabric Washing Instructions

    The crayon tinting embroidery method has existed since the 1930s or 40s and some things have survived, such as aprons and tea towels, with some fading. However, since this is an embroidered quilt and since we can't be absolutely sure about about new stain fighting soap formulas, the best thing to do is treat it like the very delicate hand-made quilt that it is, by using Woolite and washing with cold water on the delicate cycle or by hand washing. For example, if your child accidentally were to get crayon on their shirt, you'd probably never get it out, but Murphy's law being what it is, if it's going to come out of something, it will come out of the quilt. So be careful! "
    You can buy white only crayons from school supply companies. I saw 12 large crayola crayons for $4.88. Just do a Google search for white crayola crayons in bulk.

  9. #9
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    If you know an elementary teacher you might ask the teacher for white crayons. My daughter teaches 4th and 5th grade - the white crayons are rarely used.

  10. #10
    Power Poster Onebyone's Avatar
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    Boxes of the same color crayons are available on Amazon.
    I believe giving what I can will never cause me to be in need.
    Being cheap is not a badge of honor.
    My heroes are working people, paying their own way, taking care of their children and being decent human beings.

  11. #11
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    Hi,
    I've been coloring quilts with crayons for over 50 years. Many of them were baby quilts washed all the time. The first ones I made have been handed down to the next generation and they still look as look today as they did 50 years ago. The material is wearing out but NOT the coloring. I didn't know to use white crayons as an underlay - I never used it but I don't think it needs it. By the way no special laundry soap was used on them - they were gathered up with the sheets and dumped into the washer and whatever laundry soap was on hand was used.

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