Go Back  Quiltingboard Forums > Main
Do You Think That Modern Imported Sewing Machines Are So Disposable? >

Do You Think That Modern Imported Sewing Machines Are So Disposable?

Do You Think That Modern Imported Sewing Machines Are So Disposable?

Old 01-23-2020, 06:47 PM
  #11  
Power Poster
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Between the dashes of a tombstone
Posts: 12,647
Default

You ask interesting questions for I hope a good discussion.

My first thought is we shouldn't expect machines to last "forever". The more "bells and whistles", the more there is to go wrong. Could we still be driving the first car we owned on a regular basis? (I think MrOK might like his 67 Barracuda back, but not sure how it would have survived almost 50 years and four kids, three of which are boys!) True there are many dependable mechanical machines out there. Singer's Featherweight comes to mind, but it only sews a straight stitch. I have had a Bernina Virtuoso QE (a computerized machine) which I bought used close to 15 years ago. I haven't had problems with it. About 8 years ago I bought a basic Janome for my Grands to sew on. Well I really like how this little mechanical machine stitches and find I sew on it quite frequently. It has only 3 preset stitch lengths and widths and that is a big drawback to depend on it completely. When in comes time to replace the Bernina..say if the motherboard goes out, I will replace with another mechanical machine. I'm not sure where I would buy it. I like the security of buying a name brand machine from a dealer. I also have a serger which I never use and a used LongArm which I love as I would never get quilts finished without it!

Even though I have several decorative stitches on the Bernina, I seldom use them. I would rather piece quilts than use those decorative stitches. I challenge myself by making minature quilts. A person's machine preference depends on what they want to sew.

As for the future of quilting/sewing, there are fragments of the population that still sew clothes (I quit doing that long ago) and the internet has helped bring that community together just as it has for the quilting segment. There are people who appreciate handmade items; again the internet has helped those who don't craft find handmade items to purchase.

We are getting used to the "modern" and improvisational aspects of our craft; so what is next?
oksewglad is offline  
Old 01-24-2020, 04:58 AM
  #12  
Super Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Alturas, CA
Posts: 9,393
Default

I have 1 computerized machine, a Elna Pro Quilter, which is at least 11 years old. I do have it serviced yearly and haven't had any real problems. I have around 26 machines, all except 2 are vintage, the 2 are from the 70's and 80's. I love all of my machines, but in general don't like computers. LOL
pocoellie is offline  
Old 01-24-2020, 05:50 AM
  #13  
Super Member
 
juliasb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Waterford Michigan
Posts: 6,011
Default

I do not buy from a dealership any more for a couple good reasons. 1. The dealership that was nearest me closed. Then next closest is close to 100 miles from me. 2. To even work with a dealership online I would not have the opportunity to touch and try. I need to be able to try out a machine. 3. The cost!. So I have gone to buying from big box stores if I need a new machine. Now I buy at garage sales or estate sales. If it needs service I will take it to be serviced. I have a number of good machines here that I can put into use everyday.
juliasb is offline  
Old 01-26-2020, 06:56 AM
  #14  
Super Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Central Wisconsin
Posts: 4,380
Default

If you have access to a Mennonite or Amish community near you, that would be the place to go to find a sewing machine repair shop. They use the old mechanical machines and their repair shops still repair other machines, too. Ask if they would be able to repair your. Their prices are way better.
maviskw is offline  
Old 01-26-2020, 07:28 AM
  #15  
Power Poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Northern Michigan
Posts: 12,664
Default

My main machine is a Husqvarna Viking Designer One that is 16 years old now. The dealer is 84 miles away. I have had it in a couple times in that 16 years for work. Well worth it to me. I have put a lot of miles on that machine and definitely do not consider it ( disposable) I also have a 1956 Singer 99K which sews the most beautiful, precise straight stitch. I love that little machine and use when I truely want as close to perfection as a human can achieve. And I have a Bernina that my uncle purchased for my aunt in 1994. I inherited it when she passed away. It is my backup machine and the one I get out when someone comes in wanting some sewing/ quilting classes.
my granddaughters have Brother machines that were bought at Walmart over 16 years ago. Those 2 machines may be plastic, big box purchases but they are good machines, have made lots of clothes, toys, purses, gifts and even a couple quilts. They have been repaired a couple times at the local sewing center. I donít consider any of them -throw away machines-
ckcowl is offline  
Old 01-26-2020, 07:50 AM
  #16  
Super Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Va.
Posts: 4,932
Default

I love all my machines, plastic, electronic, mechanical etc. They all have something that they do better than any of the others and that's why I have them. I don't really consider any of them to be throw away machines since they tend to last a long time even when being used under adverse conditions. I am hard on machines, sewing long hours and often pushing them to their limits in terms of fabrics, threads, etc. I have only broken one so far and it was probably a bit of a lemon to begin with, still, it sewed well for 7 years before the feed dog mechanism went. Then I used it for another couple of years as a backup quilter since it still did a great job at FMQ. I could have had the feed dog mechanism repaired, but it would have cost at about the same as buying a new one at $320, so that's what I did. I guess in that sense, the machine would have been considered to be a throw away by some, but I've known folks who have the high end non-throw away machines that also found repairs to be more costly than buying a new machine. So not sure at what point/price point a machine would be considered a throw away machine these days.

Rob
rryder is offline  
Old 01-26-2020, 11:17 AM
  #17  
Super Member
 
Dolphyngyrl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Southern California
Posts: 6,237
Default

I love this question my Walmart brother is well over 8 years old, never been repaired, sew practically anything. I paid about 160 for it. Its plastic and I love it. I also have my high end brother which I love as well but don't get as much sewing time on it as my walmart brother. I dont consider any machines throw away plasticeor not machines Last as long as you care for them
Dolphyngyrl is offline  
Old 01-26-2020, 12:20 PM
  #18  
Super Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Live Oak, Texas
Posts: 6,133
Default

I bought my Singer 401A in 1958. It still sews like a dream and I will never will let her go. I have bought two computer machines Brother from Walmart. The first I gave to my DD as she wanted one. The second has all the quilting feet and I have used it for several years and like it very much, If the Brother were to go out i would throw it out and buy another newer model at Walmart.
crafty pat is offline  
Old 01-26-2020, 05:25 PM
  #19  
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2019
Posts: 96
Default

I bought a Brother XR3774 for around $100 2 years ago. It had a walking foot and a quilting foot and even if it only lasts me 5 or 6 years, I'd consider it worth it. Would a $1000+ sewing machine be easier to work with or last longer- yes, possibly, but I don't have $1000+ to drop on a sewing machine so it's a moot point.

Last edited by QuiltnNan; 01-27-2020 at 04:40 AM. Reason: remove political/negative statement
vadalia is offline  
Old 01-27-2020, 11:34 AM
  #20  
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Posts: 96
Default

Originally Posted by oksewglad View Post
You ask interesting questions for I hope a good discussion.
Thank you. I always try to make people think about the sewing/quilting process. I feel it's just as important as the right sewing machine and it's offered features.

Originally Posted by oksewglad View Post
My first thought is we shouldn't expect machines to last "forever". The more "bells and whistles", the more there is to go wrong. Could we still be driving the first car we owned on a regular basis? (I think MrOK might like his 67 Barracuda back, but not sure how it would have survived almost 50 years and four kids, three of which are boys!) True there are many dependable mechanical machines out there. Singer's Featherweight comes to mind, but it only sews a straight stitch. I have had a Bernina Virtuoso QE (a computerized machine) which I bought used close to 15 years ago. I haven't had problems with it. About 8 years ago I bought a basic Janome for my Grands to sew on. Well I really like how this little mechanical machine stitches and find I sew on it quite frequently. It has only 3 preset stitch lengths and widths and that is a big drawback to depend on it completely. When in comes time to replace the Bernina..say if the motherboard goes out, I will replace with another mechanical machine. I'm not sure where I would buy it. I like the security of buying a name brand machine from a dealer. I also have a serger which I never use and a used LongArm which I love as I would never get quilts finished without it!

Even though I have several decorative stitches on the Bernina, I seldom use them. I would rather piece quilts than use those decorative stitches. I challenge myself by making minature quilts. A person's machine preference depends on what they want to sew.

As for the future of quilting/sewing, there are fragments of the population that still sew clothes (I quit doing that long ago) and the internet has helped bring that community together just as it has for the quilting segment. There are people who appreciate handmade items; again the internet has helped those who don't craft find handmade items to purchase.

We are getting used to the "modern" and improvisational aspects of our craft; so what is next?
A person after my own heart. Although I decided recently that I am still keeping 1 plastic-y electronic assist sewing machine only for more fancier stitches (it offers 32) and it's one step Buttonhole feature. I still make clothes as well as quilt. The store bought clothing does not fit very well and it's thread and fabric are just plain awful. Sure to have a wardrobe malfunction out in public! I want quality just like I want in my quilts.
*********
Originally Posted by Onebyone View Post
The last new machine I bought from Amazon. I used it for a week and couldn't bond with it and sent it back and got another model. No hassle. I've been happy with it. A dealer would never do that The same machine at the dealer was a little more expensive and no returns, The dealer said she gives free classes for the machine. I didn't need classes for the model and she knew I didn't but still would not agree to a return if I didn't like it. I have mechanical and computerized machines. Each have their place. I have several vintage Singers that I rarely use. They sew fine but no features that I am use to.
When my old 1981 Kenmore died back in the mid-1990s, I thought I burned it out or something. Since then, I noticed a pattern forming. Not only I cannot get affordable service for any machine, they seem to have a lifespan of a certain amount of years (5-25 or so) before dying. So I adapted. I clean and fix as best as I can then just as you experienced, nothing personal at the Big Box Stores.

Iona D. is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


FREE Quilting Newsletter


SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.