Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 26 to 50 of 66

Thread: Donation quilting pieces

  1. #26
    Senior Member w7sue's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Aloha, Oregon
    Posts
    413
    Blog Entries
    36
    I have donated many quilts over the years ... usually to a charity organization that gives them to children ... my favorite is the Cancer Cabin in Woods, Oregon. I usually try to give them four or five a year. One quilt I donated to the group ended up being raffled off at the library in Pacific City. I don't know how much they earned on it, but it was more than I spent making it (at least I hope so). The lady who did the longarm quilting gave me a special price because of it going to charity and that helped keep the cost down. I even bought tickets for the darn thing because I posted a picture of it on my facebook page (bragging about it being chosen for the raffle - lol) and a girlfriend said she wanted it. I didn't win it for her but it was nice knowing that I made a contribution to the local library. I would definitely do it again.

    My question is -- how do you establish a value on a quilt? When I was in the library purchasing raffle tickets I told the lady I had made it and she asked if I would consider making a quilt for the children's area of the library. The wall they wanted to hang it on is only 24" wide so I made a small wall hanging - consisting of three 12" squares with sashings and borders. I gave it to them and they have given me a receipt, but I have no idea how to establish a value for IRS purposes.

    As far as quilts for gifts - I only give to people who I know will appreciate them. We all know who those people are and it's always fun to surprise them with a gift of a quilt - just did that today - a small wall hanging for a former co-worker.

  2. #27
    Super Member carolaug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Behind my sewing machine
    Posts
    7,204
    Blog Entries
    4
    I love making quilts and spend alot on the materials and make for family and friends. No one has a clue how much I spend and that is fine...my two boys have one that I made. I used their pets as the theme. 12.00 a yard for the fabric. This was before I learned how to shop smart and also prior to having a stash. Since the theme was dogs..guess who uses the quilt...LOL...that is fine, I will say that at first I was very upset. But my husband said its because of the fabric I choose, at least they are on their couch. Both boys are always asking me to make them a quilt...when I said I did they said oh that is Layla's or Roxies...well I guess its loved. As for donating to org. I have been asked many times and have not..its cheaper to donate money. I have been asked again from a close friend for her Avon walk. I may make a string scrappy baby blanket - but never bigger that that. Sorta afraid if I start that everyone will want me to donate..I still have a lot of quilts to make for family members.
    Last edited by carolaug; 07-10-2012 at 03:10 AM.

  3. #28
    Swap Hosts Krystyna's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Long Island, NY
    Posts
    8,837
    Blog Entries
    23
    I haven't donated to general charities simply because I know that no one understands the work that goes into them. If you want to donate ... do it to a quilting group. At least there you will be appreciated!
    Krystyna
    Feel the fear and do it anyway!

  4. #29
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    2,136
    Sometimes the fault lies with the organizers. I FINALLY convinced our 4-H silent auction people to raise the minimum bids, for one. And the bidding increments had to be at larger. But I also convinced donors to put a decent value on their items--better to pitch it higher than lower. A group of gals make a quilt each year for the auction. They are slightly smaller than a twin, and the first year, they valued it as $50 piece. So what happened? The bids were so low, one of the gals in the group bid on her own product because she was heart-broken that the bidding was low. When they brought another quilt the next year, I insisted they put a value of $100 on it. What did they get? an over-bid! go figure.

  5. #30
    Super Member damaquilts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Barnesville GA
    Posts
    3,258
    I use to donate to the auction every year for the Humane society. It never made anything close to what it was worth so I stopped also.One year I ended up bidding on one of my own quilts just so it wouldn't get sent to the thrift store. LOL Now I did make a quilted tote bag for Japanese Chin rescue and it sold for $60.. Shrug??
    Who Knew? I am making more purses, smaller ones, this month for them Hopefully they will make a bunch again. But another person donated the fabric to me I am just paying for the hardware and the batting.

  6. #31
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    2,136
    Well the point to any fundraiser is to make as much as you can, and organizers look for what might bring in the most cash. A beautiful quilt draws attention and often the best way to deal with it, is to sell raffle tickets. People donate a few bucks, hoping they will be the winner. if they win, they feel like they are the luckiest people in the world, but the organization feels great that they sold many tickets, thus making money for the organization. A quilt at one of our local shows, was valued at $1600, and I know hundreds of tickets were sold. I bought some! Didn't win though.

  7. #32
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Sweet Home Alabama
    Posts
    3,225
    My experiences making and donating quilts and totes for local fund raisers has not been pleasant. You get lots of compliments but no one wants to spend the money. Anything I do from now on will be small with not so much time and money invested in it. I still make quilts for QuiltsForKids and enjoy it. I've made several for St. Jude's Children's Hospital. I'd like to get involved on a more local level with a hospital or veterans' home and get away from postage costs though.

  8. #33
    Senior Member maryfrang's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    El Lago Tx Originally from Upstate NY
    Posts
    652
    I have made several quilts for our local school's music department fun raiser. This year, I let them know how much material costs I had in the quilt. They started the bidding just under the price, and ended up getting three times that for the quilt. I don't think they even knew how much the materials cost, and did not know where the price should start. The quilt was a tshirt quilt made from the Band directors t shirst.

    Maybe we need to let the party know at least an estimate for the material on items we donate.

  9. #34
    Super Member Daylesewblessed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    West Texas
    Posts
    2,075
    DogHouseMom, I certainly appreciate your contribution to this thread. Your experience with this issue is valuable.

    My quilt donations are to an annual auction for a Bible camp. My mother has done the same for years. She has been disappointed with some of the prices and favorably surprised with others. She has a positive attitude and enjoys the experience of giving. Prices received depend on a lot of things: the economy, the attendance (which depends on advertising, weather, etc.), and the quilts. The event has one raffle quilt, 100+ auction quilts, and a room full of silent auction table toppers, wallhangings, embroidery, jelly baskets, other crafts, etc.

    I love donating to this event and attending it when I can. It is an opportunity for me to give to something I believe in. It also challenges me to do my best work. I put a lot of time into my items, but not a lot of money.

    The organizers allow the contributors to put a minimum bid on their items.

    It has been my experience that baby or juvenile themed quilts usually get the better prices. Also, wildlife or sports themed (masculine) quilts do well.

    My quilts for this event are unique. I think it adds interest to the event and the attendees have more enjoyment if there are quilts that are enjoyable to view. Not that florals and traditional quilts aren't fun to view, but you need to consider the audience. They are usually looking for gifts for family.

    Dayle

  10. #35
    Super Member coopah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Horse Country, FL
    Posts
    7,261
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Scissor Queen View Post
    Go to Wal-Mart or Target and look at the prices on table linens and bed linens. That's the price people expect to pay.
    Right! I only donated once and it was a small wall hanging. Never again. I just send a check if it's an organization I normally support.
    "A woman is like a tea bag-you can't tell how strong she is until you put her in hot water." Eleanor Roosevelt

  11. #36
    Super Member quiltingfan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    San Antonio Texas
    Posts
    1,060
    Blog Entries
    1
    In the past I made 2 quilts for an auction to support military family members. The first year I made a full/queen size and raised almost 350.00 the next year I only had time to make a twin and it raised 375. It finally dawned on me that people don't pay attention to size. I was happy to have made that much but it was very unusual circumstances. Oh it was not an auction it was a raffle. That makes a big difference. People will pay 5 dollars for a chance to win a quilt but not full price. Don't feel bad it is not a reflection on you just the economy. Beth

  12. #37
    Super Member quiltmom04's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    2,877
    Quote Originally Posted by COYOTEMAGIC View Post
    Ok, maybe I'm confused, but I thought the part of donating an item for an auction or other charity situation was for the good of the organization, not whether it brought in the money WE thought it was worth. If it brings in $1, that's $1 more than they had before.

    If you aren't willing to give freely of your fabric, time, and skills to an organization, why give to them at all?

    Like I said, maybe I'm missing the point of this thread
    I think you are missing the point a bit. Very often we hope that our work will increase the value of the raw materials, so hopefully a $50 investment in supplies could be at least doubled when the project was done. I know when I'm in a gift exchange with a limit of, say, $20, I can make that $20 into a much more valuable gift. Same with this. I want to be able to give more to an organization than I might write out in a check. Also, who among us has not been heartbroken to see a handmade quilt treated like a dog blanket. Yes, it IS a gift, but we also know what our gift is actually worth and find it hard to see it undervalued by folks who don't know what they have. Suppose you donated a first edition book by a famous author, but the group you gave it to didn't know and sold it for $1 because it was an old, worn out book? An extreme example, perhaps, but wouldn't you be disappointed because you knew it could be worth so much more, and that's what you had intended with your gift?

  13. #38
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Baileys Prairie, Texas
    Posts
    295
    I made it a rule not to give or donate any hand made item to anyone who did not do handwork themselves. Too often you find a piece you have worked days on in the back of the pickup truck or in the garage. People who do not understand the time and effort (not including money) it takes to produce a hand done item do not value it. Just donate money or go to walmart and buy something they will love!

  14. #39
    Super Member May in Jersey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    2,549
    Had 2 different experiences with fund raising quilts. Made a twin size quilt for auction at DIL's school for autistic children and bidding was going great but stopped when the director's disabled DD put in a bid as everyone wanted her to win it. It didn't bring in as much as expected but the money went to the school and the director's DD was happy with her quilt.

    Friend knew I made quilts for a veteran's group home so she made one for me from her leftovers and gave it to me at a retreat. it really was a great looking quilt. When I got home I heard about a fund raiser for my cousin's grandson and donated the quilt. Don't know how much it brought it but whatever it was it was for a good cause, friend and I felt good about helping out and the young gal who won it was thrilled with it.

    I like making quilt tops and usually donate them to groups to finish and whatever they do with them, raffle, auction or give to others is fine with me. I'm using up my stash and helping others and that's my aim.

  15. #40
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    4,666
    Quote Originally Posted by w7sue View Post
    I have donated many quilts over the years ... My question is -- how do you establish a value on a quilt? .....they have given me a receipt, but I have no idea how to establish a value for IRS purposes.
    If you're asking the amount you can claim as a charitable contribution on your tax return, it's the cost of your materials only, no labor, as documented by receipts in case of audit.
    The Earth without art is just "Eh".

  16. #41
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    30
    I have donated crocheted lap quilts to use in a Silent Auction and it went for $15-$18 dollars. The yarn cost me over $25.00 so I would just rather give them a donation. I donate my lap quilts to the VA and they are happy to receive them.

  17. #42
    Super Member Latrinka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Slidell, Louisiana
    Posts
    6,946
    I think if they sell raffle tickets for it, they bring in more money.
    If a woman's work is never done....why start?

  18. #43
    Super Member justflyingin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Jozefow, Poland
    Posts
    4,500
    Quote Originally Posted by Nona View Post
    I made it a rule not to give or donate any hand made item to anyone who did not do handwork themselves.
    This is an excellent policy. I decided this as well, a few years ago.

    I find that it alleviates careless handling of the handmade items also.

  19. #44
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    toronto
    Posts
    825
    I donate each year for the church's Chtistmas bazaar and it is always raffled off. They always get at least what the quilt is worth- so much better than an auction. Others I donate just as gifts usually for children at a medical camp or hospital. They are always well received.

  20. #45
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Lowell, MA
    Posts
    14,087
    You are not alone. For years I made quilted items for our church fair and while some look forward to seeing what I have made and then puchase them, others look at them, ask if I will lower the price, and I refuse. A church fair or charity auction is just that a way to make money for that organization. When I have made the raffle quilts, however, one of my quilts raised nearly $2,000, and others at least $1,000. I'm not sure why but when people come to a church fair they have the notion that the materials are all donated anyway, so why should we pay more? Don't get discouraged, you know you are doing a good thing by all your efforts, pat yourself on the back and ignore negative comments as much as you can. Good luck and continue to make those items when your heart tells you to make them. God bless.

  21. #46
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    North Dakota
    Posts
    116
    oh how heartbreaking ! people just dont value people's time and talent.

  22. #47
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    425
    I make a lot of lap sized quilts for charity. I would rather give a monetary donation to any fund raisers because as others have stated, people don't realize the time and money that goes into them and expect to get them for very little.

  23. #48
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Southeast Georgia
    Posts
    2,526
    I don't donate anything handmade. Most people associate handmade with homemade and expect to pick it up for next to nothing. Not happening for anything I spend my time and fabric on!!!!

  24. #49
    Senior Member liont's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    475
    Yes, with all that cheap factory made products around, it takes a special group of ppl to appreciate handmade pieces.
    I have taken part in my kids' silent auction. I donated a few pieces of Pashmina of regular quality and they fetched good prices. There was a lonely lap quilt there. I think it got $25 at the end of the day.

  25. #50
    Super Member callen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Timmins, Ont. Canada
    Posts
    4,675
    What a shame that handcrafted items are so under valued. Very discouraging.
    Dance like no one is watching

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.