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Thread: Donation quilting pieces

  1. #51
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    You are right about that! I donated a quilt top that was a whole cloth with "old style" cross-stitch design. I had done it entirely in the car on the 700 mile trips to visit my family (twice a year over a 12 year period of time). It went to the charity quilts group in my guild. They backed and quilted it then used it in a raffle as a fund raiser. It brought in $900. I never did calculate how much I made per hour because I have no idea how much time went into it, but I was very pleased that it ended up serving a good purpose.

  2. #52
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    Every year I donate a queen sized quilt for our church bazaar. We raffle it. It makes between $800 and $1100. Our 'handmades' table does not make much either. I do not understand people. All the money made here goes for the needy. No one appreciates the time and effort put into these things. Some quilter friends of mine have sold a few things at local shows and say that customers are always asking for a 'markdown' on the price. They want a quality item but do not want to pay for it. GO FIGURE ?????

  3. #53
    Super Member Sierra's Avatar
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    I donate to auctions, but I always put a minimum price on my quilts. Frankly, usually that minimum price is the cost of the quilt (to me), including the proportionate cost of getting my machine gone over every year. I went from outright donating to putting a minimum price at my husbands insistence. I priced lap quilts (there were several and they were for a bus that takes children on tours) and I made the minimum at $70 each (if they didn't sell for that I wanted them back). The price put on them was $100 each and someone told the table "If no one else buys those for the bus kids I will buy them all." All five of them sold. I think the fact that I insisted on the minimum, after explaining abou the cost to me, the group realized they had real value. It was a win/win/win for me, the kids, and the group that needed the money.

  4. #54
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    A group at my church had a silent auction for a full-size quilt and I thought that was not smart as they raised $150. The next time they sold raffle tickets and raised five times that - people will "donate" $5 for a chance to win a quilt, but not spend $150.

  5. #55
    Super Member katesnanna's Avatar
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    My best friend had this happen recently. Her quilt was put into an auction directly after all the sporting memorabilia. She was very disappointed as was I for her. She had been told it was to be raffled. The school she donated it to would have made a lot more money if they had raffled it. A lot of the sports gear went for huge amounts but the men were buying with their emotions.
    I believe people are quite happy to buy raffle tickets for a few dollars but baulk at spending big money for a quilt. Her quilt wasn't displayed properly either . It was folded to fit on the table and was carried around to show the audience still folded in a square. Very disappointing all round.

  6. #56
    Senior Member JenelTX's Avatar
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    That must be really discouraging. You put time, attention, effort, and love into making something that you hoped would help the charity you support. I like the others' recommendations that you donate the cash instead. However, consider making quilts for charities that provide quilts or other blankets to people who need them, such as Project Linus. That way, you get the pleasure of quilting, and you know that the quilt will be valued by the organization who receives it.
    Jenel Looney
    Assistant to Susan Mallery
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  7. #57
    Senior Member JenelTX's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sierra View Post
    I made the minimum at $70 each (if they didn't sell for that I wanted them back). The price put on them was $100 each and someone told the table "If no one else buys those for the bus kids I will buy them all." All five of them sold. I think the fact that I insisted on the minimum, after explaining abou the cost to me, the group realized they had real value. It was a win/win/win for me, the kids, and the group that needed the money.
    You're my hero!!!
    Jenel Looney
    Assistant to Susan Mallery
    New York Times bestselling author

  8. #58
    Super Member Rose_P's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pat625 View Post
    I donated a full size hand quilted quilt for a school function auction..It sold for $55!! A lap quilt I gave to the same auction went for the same price..It broke my heart, but I learned a valuable lesson...make small cheaper items and they will get the same money for it!!
    Thanks. I'm taking notes. So far the donations I have been doing are only modest little quilts that are to be given directly (via our guild) to people in hospitals, women's and children's shelters, etc.. I think I'll continue to do that because it's seems more rewarding that way. I never actually find out who gets them or what they think of them, but maybe imagination is better than a disappointing reality.
    Last edited by Rose_P; 07-10-2012 at 10:12 PM.

  9. #59
    Power Poster oksewglad's Avatar
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    My experience is mixed as well. I donate to my church and adjoining school. The fall church fundraiser doesn't raise as much as the winter school auction. I have learned to donate different types of items depending on the fundraiser. I also make small items for auctions for individuals to help cover medical costs. These always go for more than my cost of materials, but not outrageously high. Yes I will continue to donate, but will be careful in selecting what I give.
    Don't worry spider.
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    Nothing's too small...I love miniatures.

  10. #60
    Super Member Bluelady's Avatar
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    I donated a crib size quilt to a co-worker for his daughter's PTA. I told him not to expect much $$$ for it. So when he told me it went for $55 I was actually rather pleased. I figured anything over $25 was good. knowing they rarely bring in what it cost to make them at these auctions. But I figure someone got a nice quilt at a very good price and it will be enjoyed by someone who really wanted it. And the PTA gets some money. It would have been donated to Linus or local hospital otherwise, so I didn't lose anything.

  11. #61
    Super Member rusty quilter's Avatar
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    I am sorry to say that I have found the same thing in my donations. I suspect that Scissor Queen is right--people expect to pay what they would at Wal Mart. Now I give money, and give my quilts to those who I know will appreciate them

  12. #62
    Super Member Sierra's Avatar
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    I meant to add to my "minimum price" letter that I also made a example label that said "Donated to ....... by [your name here], but no one wanted it!!! Once they decided to be generous, that's the way it went!

  13. #63
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    I don't make auction type donation quilts. If I make a quilt I find someone that needs it or really wants it for what it is. OR--- just give it to someone that is special but sometime the special person does not treat it as aspecial quilt. Most people do not realize what goes into making a quilt, even a machine quilt. But you gave it in good faith and the Lord knows it and he appreciate it I am sure.

  14. #64
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    I also totally agree. I am so disappointed when something you make especially a quilt that is never appreciated. That is one reason I don't make quilts for anyone other than my children/grand children...they do apprreciate them.

    And people who think oh you could just whip it out and they have no clue as to what making a quilt involves or costs. Especially now with fabrics going for so much!

  15. #65
    Super Member Sierra's Avatar
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    "auction type donation quilts" ouch! My auctioned quilts were for school children who travel on long trips and the quilts were as strong and as fun (for kids) as I could make, all with themes that fit the students' efforts. The desk at the auction told me that they were considered "perfect for the kids". I can't speak for everyone, but my auction quilts and other charity quilts are the best I can do. They are NOT art quilts, or the most complicated but they are the best I can do, as is every quilt I make. Yes, for charity I use fabrics that are no longer my favorite for giving to the fall blanket drive. What pleases me any more may not please someone else, and I liked the fabrics enough once to buy them. I think many quilters like to think of the possible person who may get the quilt they are making and that they don't sew "down" because they don't really care that much about who ever will get it.
    Last edited by Sierra; 07-13-2012 at 05:07 PM.

  16. #66
    Junior Member cad_queen_2000's Avatar
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    i made a queen size eagle quilt and donated it to an auction to raise money for our local minor hockey league. unfortunately, i think it raised less than 200 dollars. disappointing, yes. now i just donate quilts for raffles. or just give them to people that need them. everyone is right, people want to pay the prices they see in walmart. they have no clue as to what goes into making a quilt.

    i have had people ask me to make one for them. i tell them to buy all the materials, (fabric, batting, backing, etc.) and i give them approximate prices for all, then i never hear from them again. i guess it is just too expensive for them, and i wasn't going to charge them anything for my labour in making the quilt! oh well.

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