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Thread: Embroidery Machines Lets Chat & Have Fun

  1. #2551
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dolphyngyrl View Post
    How does everyone like the floriani products, I just took the plunge asnd bought a bunch of their stabilizers as I wasn't as happy with my stabilizers, might gift them to my aunt, she just got her machine
    I just started using Floriani thread and love it! I haven't tried the stabilizers since they always seem to be quite expensive, however I just found out a local quilt shop honors the JoAnn coupons so the next 50% off ones I get I may try their stabilizers.

  2. #2552
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    I found this on the Craftsy blog.
    Stabilizer for in-the-hoop embroidery:

    You’ll want to be sure to use stabilizer for your embroidery projects. Most projects call for tearaway stabilizer. And this is where I change things up a bit. I like tearaway stabilizer, but sometimes a washaway stabilizer may work better. And other times I prefer to use unbleached muslin that has been pressed and starched as my stabilizer.
    My preference for a project that should be soft like a zipper bag or a project that is quilted, is to use a very soft tearaway stabilizer, unbleached muslin, or a paperlike washaway stabilizer. The muslin should be a high quality and have a thread count of 200, rather than a muslin with a looser weave. The stabilizer will end up staying inside the project, so it is important to use something that works with the purpose of the project. Tearaway stabilizers that are left within a project tend to soften with washing and use. If you hold tearaway stabilizer under running water, you will see that it falls apart. This is good for a project that you’d like to be soft.
    My preference for a project that stands alone with satin stitches on the outer edge such as Christmas ornaments, coasters, or door hangers, is a washaway stabilizer. Often these projects call for a tearaway, but my experience is that there is always a little bit of the tearaway that can be seen around the edge of the object, even after the project has been wet and dried again. And if you want a very stiff project, after the object is finished, wet it without rinsing all of the washaway stabilizer out and you will see that the stabilizer actually melts and “starches” the ornaments.

  3. #2553
    Super Member Quilty-Louise's Avatar
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    Thanks for the informative insight.

    I am going to put this into my "book of embroidery knowledge".




    Quote Originally Posted by Jratcliff View Post
    I found this on the Craftsy blog.
    Stabilizer for in-the-hoop embroidery:

    You’ll want to be sure to use stabilizer for your embroidery projects. Most projects call for tearaway stabilizer. And this is where I change things up a bit. I like tearaway stabilizer, but sometimes a washaway stabilizer may work better. And other times I prefer to use unbleached muslin that has been pressed and starched as my stabilizer.
    My preference for a project that should be soft like a zipper bag or a project that is quilted, is to use a very soft tearaway stabilizer, unbleached muslin, or a paperlike washaway stabilizer. The muslin should be a high quality and have a thread count of 200, rather than a muslin with a looser weave. The stabilizer will end up staying inside the project, so it is important to use something that works with the purpose of the project. Tearaway stabilizers that are left within a project tend to soften with washing and use. If you hold tearaway stabilizer under running water, you will see that it falls apart. This is good for a project that you’d like to be soft.
    My preference for a project that stands alone with satin stitches on the outer edge such as Christmas ornaments, coasters, or door hangers, is a washaway stabilizer. Often these projects call for a tearaway, but my experience is that there is always a little bit of the tearaway that can be seen around the edge of the object, even after the project has been wet and dried again. And if you want a very stiff project, after the object is finished, wet it without rinsing all of the washaway stabilizer out and you will see that the stabilizer actually melts and “starches” the ornaments.
    Louise - Ya-ya to Zachary April 13 2015. I collect mugs from the U.S. and around the world. Also collect handmade pincushions, sewing/quilting themed fabrics, and fabric in general.

  4. #2554
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    I made this for my fiancée for Valentine's Day. It's a saying he always says and I found it at emblibrary.com which suffice to say its my FAVORITE site for design. I used Floriani Thread and not one breakage when stitching out this design. I used cutaway stabilizer and will be finishing it for a pillow for him. Just wanted to share.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  5. #2555
    Senior Member sewred's Avatar
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    Quiltnut4ever that is very pretty!
    Sew, sew, it's the threads that keep love together :>} I love sunbonnet sue,old-fashioned things like 1950's or older housewife things, and like hankies,tea towels and aprons . Thanks to some lovely members on here I now have lots of aprons in my collection !!

  6. #2556
    Super Member chamby's Avatar
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    I am so glad I found this post. I have a brother. It only does embroidery and it limited to the 5x7 hoop. Any suggestions as to what I can work on? I do not need to do baby quilts. I do not have grandchildren and will not have any. I use it mainly for quilt labels. I am very new at embroidery and need all the help I can get.
    Charlene

  7. #2557
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    Quote Originally Posted by chamby View Post
    I am so glad I found this post. I have a brother. It only does embroidery and it limited to the 5x7 hoop. Any suggestions as to what I can work on? I do not need to do baby quilts. I do not have grandchildren and will not have any. I use it mainly for quilt labels. I am very new at embroidery and need all the help I can get.
    I've gotten in to doing quilting in the hoop stuff. Hoopsisters has some really nice designs and they are generally digitized for all size blocks from 4" up to 9". Urban threads has lots of suggestions on their website for how to use various designs so not all for quilts or tablerunners. Artistic Thread Works also has a variety of tutorials and suggestions. Actually, I imagine most of the well known sites have suggestions, but these are the ones I use most often. Oh, and MollyMine. I love her stuff - always very accurate stitchouts.

  8. #2558
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    Quote Originally Posted by chamby View Post
    I am so glad I found this post. I have a brother. It only does embroidery and it limited to the 5x7 hoop. Any suggestions as to what I can work on? I do not need to do baby quilts. I do not have grandchildren and will not have any. I use it mainly for quilt labels. I am very new at embroidery and need all the help I can get.
    Once you get started you will find you can embroider on anything depending on the chosen design. I have embroidered on tablecloths, placemats, mug rugs, napkins, shirts, aprons, pot holders, birthday/Christmas cards and even toilet paper. (if it can't move to get away from me, it's embroidered) Even though your hoop is not the largest with practice you can do multi-hooping. Ask at your dealer for any project you need help with, they are usually pretty good with that.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    I don't know how to do that.....YET!
    Life Is About Using The Whole Box Of Crayons.

  9. #2559
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    gramquilter2, how on earth do you do embroidery on toilet paper?? Are there any good tutorials out there detailing how it is done? This is something I would really like to try!!

  10. #2560
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    Here is a tutorial I watched before I did some for Christmas and them I got help from a wonderful person on the board also.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gSBs6CkV1AE

    Quote Originally Posted by DixieDoodle View Post
    gramquilter2, how on earth do you do embroidery on toilet paper?? Are there any good tutorials out there detailing how it is done? This is something I would really like to try!!
    Faten
    Www.easyquiltingcorner.com

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  11. #2561
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    I've been doing a Hoopsisters quilt. It has been a very long process - about 11 months now and I'm definitely not done. They recommend (and sell) battelizer which is a batting with stabilizer built in. Great stuff and I really like it. You hoop the battlizer and do the rest of the work on it. It is not inexpensive and hooping it creates a ton of waste, so someone in the class suggested hooping the cheapest possible muslin and cut the battelizer to size. The thing I've noticed is the blocks turn out very stiff and will not make a soft snuggly quilt! I see from a previous post that the muslin shouldn't be less than a 200 thread count. Oops! Today I changed to a tear away stabilizer I get from JoAnns. It is very soft with lots of holes and I love it. The blocks are really nice and soft and are not distorting at all.
    I have made a couple of soft dolls and used tearaway, but it was the more solid stiff stuff. I'll definitely go to the more porous one for the dolls. Nice and soft!

  12. #2562
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    No offense please....but why would one take time to embroider on toilet paper? Perhaps for learning about stabilizers? Thread tension? Obviosly one does not use "wash a-way " stabilizer! (Pun intended). I see my attempts being a " waste" of time. (Sorry, I could not resist!)

    Yes, I have seen the TP rolls posted. Just has always been a curious thing to me. But my time is very tight (still working FT) and I have other projects in the works. I do appreciate the challenge, tho.
    Sandygirl

    Janome 9900 / Janome 9700 / Janome Decor 3050 / Janome 1100D serger
    Singer Centennial model (inherited from my late, fav aunt!)

  13. #2563
    Super Member gramquilter2's Avatar
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    DixieDoodle, Embroidery Library is where I got the tutorial for mine. It is really easy to do and the paper is on the roll when you embroider it.
    I don't know how to do that.....YET!
    Life Is About Using The Whole Box Of Crayons.

  14. #2564
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    You fold the first "square" of TP under the second and embroider on the second piece so no additonal stabilizer is needed. These are just fun, easy and quick projects which are used a lot for gag gifts. The ones like the flowers posted are just cute to sit on a bathroom counter or shelf. There are some tutorials that show how to make Snowmen or Santas for a fast Christmas project.

  15. #2565
    Super Member gramquilter2's Avatar
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    I fold the first 2 squares back, fold again and then embroider on the 2nd set of squares, use the 1st for a neater fold back. I give these as fun gifts. I realize some may think it is a waste of time to embroider on Tissue but I love the machine embroidery process and have a lot of fun trying new things and when you put that amount of money in a machine, I think it needs to be used.
    I don't know how to do that.....YET!
    Life Is About Using The Whole Box Of Crayons.

  16. #2566
    Super Member Quilty-Louise's Avatar
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    Has anyone tried to make any of the "fringe" designs from
    Embroidery Library?

    I have one design but have not yet tried. Guess that I am
    a little more than intimidated by trying this.

    LOL but heck I still have yet to try embroidery applique.
    Louise - Ya-ya to Zachary April 13 2015. I collect mugs from the U.S. and around the world. Also collect handmade pincushions, sewing/quilting themed fabrics, and fabric in general.

  17. #2567
    Senior Member Sophie2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Quilty-Louise View Post
    Has anyone tried to make any of the "fringe" designs from
    Embroidery Library?

    I have one design but have not yet tried. Guess that I am
    a little more than intimidated by trying this.

    LOL but heck I still have yet to try embroidery applique.
    I have done the fringe designs using Adorable Designs. They turned out really cute and will be doing them again.
    Sophie2

  18. #2568
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    Quilty-Louise,

    Thanks for letting me know I'm not the only intimidated soul when it comes to machine embroidery!

    Sushi

  19. #2569
    Super Member Quilty-Louise's Avatar
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    Other than the fringe only other thing that stops me dead
    in my tracks IS the applique LOL.

    I don't know why either, everyone keeps telling me that it
    is super fun and easy.

    Maybe someday I will get around to it.

    But I do love both my embroidery machines.



    Quote Originally Posted by sushi View Post
    Quilty-Louise,

    Thanks for letting me know I'm not the only intimidated soul when it comes to machine embroidery!

    Sushi
    Louise - Ya-ya to Zachary April 13 2015. I collect mugs from the U.S. and around the world. Also collect handmade pincushions, sewing/quilting themed fabrics, and fabric in general.

  20. #2570
    Senior Member qwkslver's Avatar
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    Does anyone have a Janome Memorycraft 200e? And does it work? Cause mine doesn't. I got it last August and I have yet to get more than 3 or 4 designs out of it without it running away (where the on/off button does nothing and I have to turn the whole machine off to stop it). I don't know if I am doing something wrong or what. I send it back, they send it back to me, it still don't work. I would be grateful for anyone's input on this.

  21. #2571
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    Quote Originally Posted by tallchick View Post
    I have not had my machine out in over a year!!! I would like to make a few blocks but I forgot.......

    1: Do I complete the design on the block then square up to the size I need.

    2: or do I cut my block to size, then center the design and go from there.

    Sorry for the silly question but my brain appears to be on strike this week..........
    Lisa,
    I have done many blocks for quilts and I always oversize and then square up after embroidery - there is push/pull compensation that needs to be factored in.
    Judi in Ohio

  22. #2572
    Super Member Quilty-Louise's Avatar
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    I do the same thing I ALWAYS try to oversize my blocks so that
    squaring them up AFTER embroidery gives me enough room around
    the design to have a decent amount of background if needed.



    Quote Originally Posted by Judi in Ohio View Post
    Lisa,
    I have done many blocks for quilts and I always oversize and then square up after embroidery - there is push/pull compensation that needs to be factored in.
    Louise - Ya-ya to Zachary April 13 2015. I collect mugs from the U.S. and around the world. Also collect handmade pincushions, sewing/quilting themed fabrics, and fabric in general.

  23. #2573
    pw6
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    ok, I have a Husvarna Viking Topaz 30 and tons of deigns.. having problems posting pics right now for some reason, will post as soon as I can figure out why I cannot post.. seems the url does not come up in the box and I do not know what to put into the box to insert pics

  24. #2574
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    [QUOTE=chamby;6593099]I am so glad I found this post. I have a brother. It only does embroidery and it limited to the 5x7 hoop.

    I just bought a Brother with the 5X7 hoop. Have an older Babylock with a larger 6X10 hoop (but uses a floppy disk for design transfer -- UGH!) -- I find that most designs I want to do work fine in a 5X7. I do t-shirts and kitchen towels, placemats and table runners, pillow tops, wall hangings -- I just did 7 designs of coffee cups, "framed" them in embroidery hoops, and hung them in my kitchen. Am just finishing up a 12 kitchen towel set with SunBonnet Sue months of the year. I mainly do gifts. Just have fun with your machine.

  25. #2575
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    I have a ellageo Esg. purchased about 1998 or 99 when I owned a Western Store and wanted to be able to monogram things. Had 1 class on how to use it and also 1 class on software (Designer's Gallery and Pallette ) No one told me I couldn't do it or that it was hard, so I just crashed into it and did it. The most difficult thing I have ever done was monograming a horse blkt which was fiber filled and thick. I got it done but said never again on a machine which like that. I also made baby bibs with western theme and emb. onsies with western designs. They sold very well because most of that kind of stuff is expensive and I could sell it for a reasonable price. After I closed the shop, my machine set up for over 10 yrs before I got interested again. When I took it to the dealer to have it serviced it cost a lot because they had to send it bk to Babylock and several parts had to be replaced. I now do towels for myself and friends, quilt blks and whatever strikes my fancy. So please, don't be afraid of your machine. Just go for it. I have learned a lot from emb.forums and sites such as Emblibrary: Quilting and Emb. are my favorite things to do outside of reading.

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