Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 26 to 46 of 46

Thread: Ever had a cutting/sewing "marathon"?

  1. #26
    Super Member Aurora's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Somewhere in Time
    Posts
    2,168
    Blog Entries
    2
    Once a year we have a "Lock-In" from 6:00 p.m. until 7:00 a.m. In addition, we schedule a UFO for that day, so some of us are almost sewing for 24 hours. Each year we have a couple more brave souls who go the distance. We do a pot luck and in the past have had breakfast as well. It is alot of fun.
    Aurora

    "A dying culture invariably exhibits personal rudeness. Bad manners. Lack of consideration for others in minor matters. A loss of politeness, of gentle manners, is more significant than is a riot." -Robert A. Heinlein

  2. #27
    Super Member Raggiemom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Cincinnati, OH
    Posts
    3,605
    I do that all the time. For some reason, I prefer to work on several things at once. I've never mixed up the pieces, the fabric used for each project is generally so different. Try it and see it if works for you.
    Heather

  3. #28
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Maine-ly Florida
    Posts
    3,809
    Hmmm, there's a thought. I'd like to try a disappearing 4block. I could make one block to test it, figure out my measurements and cut enough for a couple of quilts. My guild has a call out for twin sized quilts for a women's shelter. Might be a way to use up some fabric, too.

  4. #29
    Senior Member bunniequilter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Buried Under My Stash up in Canada!
    Posts
    556
    I tend to work thhis way all the time. I have somehting to cut, something to sew, somehting to applique and something to quilt on the go at all times. If I get tired of doing one thing I can switch to something else/ I also have a few paintings and some knitting on the go as well.
    Quilt outside of the box!

  5. #30
    Senior Member Bneighbor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    NE Ohio
    Posts
    464
    Last year I decided to take about 6 patterns and fabric "on the road". We drag race and I have down time between rounds (after car maintenance) and in the evening.
    I cut and tagged each quilt then put each one into a gallon or two gallon (whichever fit the best) zip lock bag. I made sure the pattern instructions were added. I actually printed a copy to make it easier to put everything together as two of the quilts were from the same book. No need to carry any extra weight!
    Did this one weekend while we were at a race. When we got home it took these "kits" with me to the fabric store to get thread, trim etc. which I put in each correct bag. They were then stored in a small closet designated just for my quilting. I have a swing machine, a tote with threads and notions and a quilters tote with everything a quilter would need. I can set up and be ready to sew in about 15 minuets or less.
    Every race weekend I had a quilt to work on. Sometimes I would work on two at a time, if I was strip sewing. Last year I finished all six, plus three more I made up mid-season. I have several that need to be quilted yet. Most I FMQ this winter and gave as gifts, most baby-lap size quilts and wall hangings. I love rain during the week of a race, I can sew more. Sun for the weekend is a must...got to race to win!
    This year, our race season starts a month later than normal, so my travel-sewing will be off to a slow start.
    Maybe I should get off the computer and go upstairs and sew?

  6. #31
    Super Member luvstoquilt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Yorkville, IL
    Posts
    4,695
    Blog Entries
    3
    I "kitted" several quilts last year but I just made one at a time. It was a lot of fun to just go get a new kit! This year I am determined to get my UFO's finished...I found 3 I didn't even remember. I am afraid if I tried your suggestion I would sew them together all wrong!
    "You must do the thing you think you cannot do"....E. Roosevelt

    Sharon
    Yorkville, IL

  7. #32
    Senior Member QuiltNama's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Duluth/ Superior, WI
    Posts
    940
    I cut several quilts out at one time, organize them in the see through 9" x 13" plastic cake containers with a copy of the pattern, and sew on them when I get 15 mins. at a time or longer. I purchase the containers at walmart (they come in 2 paks) and stack on one another so do not take up a lot of room. If I do one top at a time, have a tendency to get bored with it, so this way can work on whatever strikes my fancy for that day. Usually will complete them all about the same time and can move on to another group. Most important thing....keep a copy of the patten with the top! Ask me about that one.LOL

  8. #33
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    183
    Wow! Thanks for all the replies. I'm glad I'm not the only one to think of this. I'm glad it's worked out for some of you.
    Last night I cut 3 tops (except for sashings which I usually cut after the blocks are done), and another one is from precuts, so that's 4 ready to go. I just need to decide on a pattern for the last one and cut it and I'll have 5 freshly cut, one WIP (work in progress), and a few to quilt. :-) These may get done yet!

  9. #34
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    864
    I make a lot of quilts for homeless families (425 since 1996) and always have a lot of projects going at one time, and I sometimes do get into marathons where I will cut for 40 hours in one week, piece for 30 hours in a week, quilt for 25 or 30 hours in a week, etc. I generally don't stop what I set out to do until I reach the end, but might do some each day, not do it without taking breaks.

    What would prompt a marathon might be a fabric donation, where new-to-me fabrics need to be washed and cut, or where I'm making a quilt in a class and need to cut pieces (35 hours of cutting with a rotary cutter for a Bonnie Hunter mystery), or when a cable station does a marathon of shows I like and I piece while watching. Sometimes friends might sew with me and we get on a roll. Recently, a friend had a deadline and we both pushed the quilting/binding for eight hours until done. It could also be prompted by lousy weather when I'd rather be inside. It is always nice to have pre-cut strips waiting for me when I need them.

    I have different stations set up for quilting, piecing, serging (I also make clothes), pressing, cutting, etc. However, I do need to alternate between jobs so my muscles don't get sore. I always want to have another project to turn to, that is ready for me to do, when I finish one. If I have a couple different types of projects ready, say binding, or quilting, or piecing, then I can choose what I feel like doing. That might be something to keep in mind.

    Currently, this is what I am actively working on:

    1 quilt to be bound
    3 quilts sandwiched, pin basted, and ready to be quilted
    7 quilts and backs waiting to be sandwiched
    1 quilt cut out and ready to start piecing
    1 set of blocks done QAYG style and needing sashing; I have to find the right fabric
    Another 5 sets of blocks ready to be made into tops
    One set of blocks waiting to be put into a top; I just made the back
    Another set of blocks set into groups and waiting for their turn on the design wall
    A number of inactive projects or those waiting in the wings. I have a whole shelf of those.

    Is that 20 quilts I'm actively doing at the current time? They will get done. Having more projects in the pipeline keeps me interested. I also have several in the design stage.

    I finished ten (10) quilts in the past month. Most of these were adult size. I used various patterns.

    If you keep your stuff organized so you can find it later, and you also be sure to take breaks so you don't get hurt or sore, you should be okay. If you are like me, you won't want to cut out too many in advance in case you change your mind about the pattern before you get to it. Go for it!
    Last edited by cricket_iscute; 02-01-2013 at 10:57 AM.

  10. #35
    Super Member jcrow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Small town in Northeast Oregon close to Washington and Idaho
    Posts
    2,734
    Blog Entries
    5
    Golly dog Gal! Won't you get confused during the process? I'm making twelve blocks at the same time for one quilt and have to keep checking to make sure I have the right blocks together!!! You go for it! You have to be a young 'un! When I was young, I could have probably done a few at once. I vote for you! Impress me and give us the good results!!!
    "Be yourself...everyone else is taken."
    Strong people don't put others down...they build them up."
    "Remember that your instincts are more important than rules"

  11. #36
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Iowa and Minnesota
    Posts
    424
    I usually cut several quilts at one time but have learned to label everything very well because when I go back to sewing them, 'sometimes' I can't figure out what goes where!!!!

  12. #37
    Super Member Cindy60545's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Wills Point, Texas
    Posts
    2,438
    Hey, I'm in the same boat as cricket! I have several (?) in varying stages.
    QOV on the longarm now, on final approach, then trim, bind.
    a customer baby quilt to do on LA, 3 of mine waiting to go on.
    a QOV - blocks done, need to put together, do borders, quilt, binf
    2 scrappy cribs on design wall in various stages of assembly
    Santa on other design wall, 3 bargello borders sewn, 4th on DSM now, then border it, quilt it, bind it.
    Coloring a crib sized wholecloth - Irena Bluhm style
    Designing a wholecloth wall hanging
    Still working on GFG.
    Oh! And a couple UFO's if I get bored!!

  13. #38
    Senior Member Lstew2212's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Connellsville Pa
    Posts
    735
    For my self, I usually have about three project going on at one time. When I get stuck or bored with one I move onto another one. I usually come back to all my projects. Currently I have one that needs to be quilted, one that needs to be sandwiched and a few that I need to make into quilt tops (all the piecing done). I am working on the BOM from craftsy, so I have piecing to do there. My downfall is finding new patterns I want to start, I always see something I want to make for the future.
    Happy Sewing, Lisa E.
    Don't Cry Because It Is Over, Smile Because it Happened, Dr. Seuss

  14. #39
    Super Member janiesews's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Iola KS
    Posts
    2,841
    I like to "Marathon" cut, then place each individually in large zip-lock bags-marked well and with pattern. I keep them separate and work on them 1 at a time. I am also afraid I would get them mixed together. But I like to have the cutting done-it makes me feel like it is about 1/2 done with the cutting done. If I run across a good sale I may pick up the backing fabric and always put it with the "kit" I plan to use it on.
    This too shall pass.
    Janie

  15. #40
    Senior Member mhollifiel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Edenton and Raleigh, NC
    Posts
    778
    Blog Entries
    4
    I only piece tops for my guild's Project Linus blankets so, yes, I do marathon cutting. I basically inventory my stash every January (February this year!), select "companion" pieces and make up medium to large sets from the stash. My raised 6' two mat cutting table is on the screened in porch so I save cutting until spring and fall when the weather is really nice. I have a smaller mat on my big sewing table but just cut strips into units and only rarely need to use that one for cutting up fabric.
    I do marathon cutting where I get 10" squares, 4 1/2" strips and 2 1/2" strips from these companion fabric sets. Odd leftovers are cut into 1 1/2" strips. I use the initial or end cut strips (uneven waste) to tie these cuts stacked together for later marathon strip piecing, etc. I mostly do Wicked Easy quilts and Potato Chip or just checkerboard. I have a tub of 2 1/2" strips for jelly roll race style quilts and a huge pile of 1 1/2" strips for scrap strip piecing when that mood strikes. The 10" has really been a useful cut since I can further cut it if needed. These cuts do about all I need for my piecing!
    This works well for me. I finished piecing 75 tops for our PL projects in the last 6 months of 2012, took a long cycle trip to Alaska and kept up with our two crab pots' production as well as regular cooking and a wee bit of cleaning! (I clean house every three months whether it needs it or not!)
    Since I have lots of cut squares and strips on hand to work with, I spend the really cold, really hot, and rainy or inclement weather sewing tops and I am never bored with it.
    Holli
    Your Favorite (Retired) School Librarian

    Today I bent the truth to be kind, and I have no regret, For I am far surer of what is kind than I am of what is true.

  16. #41
    Super Member quiltmom04's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    2,877
    I would be hesitant to cut several projects out at once. I have been sewing for many, many years and STILL do a practice block or sample to test size and accuracy. Also piecing technique. Sometimes I change the cutting directions to something the easier. But I HAVE cut a lot of scraps and small pieces into 5" squares or strips. So I'd suggest that.

  17. #42
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    412
    I used to do that when I was making doll clothes for craft fairs. I would do all the cutting and put each pattern in a separate zip lock bag with pattern # pined to it. All same pattern in same bag. Saved time as I can't stand to cut too long-back gives out lol. I've tried it with my small quilts but only do a couple at a time.
    Kathy Osterby

  18. #43
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    864
    Quote Originally Posted by jcrow View Post
    Golly dog Gal! Won't you get confused during the process? I'm making twelve blocks at the same time for one quilt and have to keep checking to make sure I have the right blocks together!!! You go for it! You have to be a young 'un! When I was young, I could have probably done a few at once. I vote for you! Impress me and give us the good results!!!
    Jeanne, I assume you are talking to me? My mind feels young, but my body has reached the senior citizen stage. I was forced into an early retirement by the economy about three years ago. People have always commented on how much I get done, no matter what it is I'm doing. (I've taught time management, but being retired lets me slow down and do things when I "feel" like it. Also, old injuries slow me down a lot.) I'm an engineer by profession, and accustomed to thinking in systems, that is, how parts relate to the whole. I usually have many multi-part projects going at the same time.

    And no, I don't get confused. I keep the parts together either in boxes or baskets. Even though I have a lot in my sewing room and not a spare inch, I am reasonably organized. I finish about 40 quilts a year on average, most of them adult size. I also teach academic classes and take classes; my favorite subjects lately are physics and fractals. Again, lots of parts in physics, all needing to fit together.

  19. #44
    Junior Member qltgrose's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Elkhart IN
    Posts
    224
    Twice a year I am fortunate enough to attend a quilting retreat. We start at noon on Thursday and sew like demons til noon on Sunday. I try to have at least 4-6 projects with me to hopefully finish. I try to have all the cutting done and my design ideas firmly in mind, and sometimes laid out on paper. I pre-wind 10-12 bobbins of a neutral piecing thread, so when I arrive I am ready to really SEW. Its amazing how much you can get done with that preparation and no phones, no internet, no tv, no family, no pets to interrupt your sewing. I would love to try this on a weekend here at home, but it always seems something else comes up...sigh... Let us know how it goes!

  20. #45
    Dee
    Dee is offline
    Super Member Dee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Pa.
    Posts
    3,618
    For me, I enjoy my sewing passion and don't want it to be a assembly line job. I would get burned out and accomplish nothing. But different storkes for different folks. Good luck whatever you do. Happy Quilting.

  21. #46
    Super Member IBQUILTIN's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    North Fork Ca
    Posts
    8,254
    I did that for just one quilt that I needed fast, and I didn't like it at all. I got too tired of cutting and cutting and cutting.,

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.