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Thread: Fabric grain lines

  1. #1
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    Fabric grain lines

    When I first started quilting, grain lines were always stressed when piecing blocks. It seems they are becoming less and less relevant. I just watch Jenny Doan from MSQC cutting 2 triangles from charm squares to make her new The Wedge Quilt. Wouldn't it make piecing the triangles difficult? What is your opinion on bias or not on the straight of the grain piecing?

  2. #2
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
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    It's best to have the straight of grain on the edges of the blocks. Jenny does lots of things the quick and dirty way. She is an expert, knows how not to stretch the fabric when she's pressing or sewing - or maybe she never gets around to actually completing those projects, LOL.

  3. #3
    Super Member Buckeye Rose's Avatar
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    The first thing I thought of is applique and paper piecing, neither always use pieces on the grain. I would think borders and binding should be on the grain in general, but there are exceptions to both. Since all pieces are either stitched down as in applique, or secured by quilting, I am not concerned by if all pieces are on the grain as there is no stress on each individual piece. I don't think the hard and fast rules of "on the grain" apply much to quilting.....clothes yes, quilts no. But then that is just me and my very humble opinion. If I am way out of line, please inform me why because I want to know.

  4. #4
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
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    I try to keep the grain lines straight and consistent (lengthwise vs crosswise) because it affects the perceived color of the fabrics. Light reflects differently off warp and weft threads. Piecing on straight of grain is also a whole lot easier and more accurate, imho.
    Last edited by ghostrider; 08-19-2013 at 08:08 PM.
    The Earth without art is just "Eh".

  5. #5
    Junior Member Dalronix's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dunster View Post
    ... maybe she never gets around to actually completing those projects, LOL.
    Not specifically referring to Jenny, but after watching dozens and dozens of videos of the past few I definitely get the feeling that many tute projects are never completed because of the rough and ready cutting and sewing. Look closely at the needle in some of them and "what's a 1/4 margin among friends?"

    (Not being ungrateful here: I can't tell you how much I appreciate all those videos. I would never have got my 1 1/2 first attempts to the stage I have without them.)
    ~: Ron :~

    "You cut up fabric then sew it back together again? Really?"

  6. #6
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    I try to avoid bias piecing when ever possible unless it's PP. Straight of grain just easier to use.

  7. #7
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    I like the grainlines in a finished block to be perpendicular or parallel with the outside edges of the block.

    Exception: I like to use bias bindings.

  8. #8
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    I don't bother with paying attention to grainlines.

  9. #9
    Power Poster ube quilting's Avatar
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    I think every one should take a small project that has HST or bias cuts of some kind and just practice handling the material. The only way to learn to handle bias cuts is to use them repeatedly.

    Practice pressing them, cutting them, sewing and pressing seams.

    One of the best days learning!
    peace
    no act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted. Aesop

  10. #10
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    if I have material with a stripes sew to speak, that determines how I cut. I try to keep track of where the selvedge edge was. Also depends on the pattern.

  11. #11
    Senior Member cindi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skittl1321 View Post
    I don't bother with paying attention to grainlines.
    Neither do I.....and it hasn't made a hoot of difference for me....

  12. #12
    Super Member mom-6's Avatar
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    As a long time garment stitcher I've always tried to keep the grain as it should be. However for small pieces I don't think it's that big an issue. If I'm doing something where it will look better if the print matches, then I try to accomplish that. Bias does not intimidate me and I usually don't have too much problem with it.

  13. #13
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    agree with skitti1321. Don't have a problem stitching on stretchy edges and gives me a lot more freedom in my cutting.
    Kate

  14. #14
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    If you use Nifty Notions (and other comparable) HSQ rulers you can save fabric and keep outside triangle edges on straight of grain. But sooner or later you are going to have to deal with a bias edge.
    Cheryl Robinson
    http://www.silverneedlestitching.com
    APQS Millenium Longarm with Intelliquilter

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