Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Results 1 to 24 of 24

Thread: Feed back needed on small sewing machine

  1. #1
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Flagstaff, Arizona
    Posts
    6,541

    Feed back needed on small sewing machine

    I am looking at a small sewing machine to take to classes and something that I can carry more easily. It is a Janome DC 1050. My LQS has one and I am wondering if anyone has this particular machine and likes and dislikes that you may like to inform me on. It has features that I like and it is light weight. I haven't tried to sew on it but am thinking of trying it out in the store.
    Thanking you all in advance for any info.

  2. #2
    Super Member Kitsie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Ridgefield WA
    Posts
    7,355
    Blog Entries
    41
    I googled "review of Janome DC 1050" and there are many posts. Perhaps they will help you. Good luck!
    http://s1248.photobucket.com/albums/hh485/KitsieH/
    Never regret growing older, its a privilege denied to many.
    Be kinder than necessary, for everyone you meet is fighting some kind of battle.

    Kitsie

  3. #3
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Flagstaff, Arizona
    Posts
    6,541
    Thank you Kitsie-I will go and check that review link

  4. #4
    Power Poster Onebyone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Southern USA
    Posts
    10,843
    I have a very old Janome Jem Gold. It's wonderful, no problems at all. I think any of the smaller Janomes will be a great machine.
    I believe giving what I can will never cause me to be in need.
    Being cheap is not a badge of honor.
    My heroes are working people, paying their own way, taking care of their children and being decent human beings.

  5. #5
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Arlington, MN
    Posts
    2,277
    If you can get ahold of a featherweight, they make great take along machines and are not heavy but sturdy.

  6. #6
    Super Member grann of 6's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Glenmoore, PA
    Posts
    7,649
    Blog Entries
    1
    I have a Baby Lock Rachel that I take to classes. It was under $400 and nice and light. I love it.

  7. #7
    Super Member eparys's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    New England, USA
    Posts
    2,510
    There are a lot of decent little class machines. When I was looking for one - budget was an issue so I first purchased a Brother cs6000i - nice little machine, good stitches and lightweight. Then I bought a featherweight on a lark. I love it!! I take it to every class, take it on retreats and take it to sewing days at the guild. The Brother sits patiently under the longarm and the feather weight goes everywhere.
    Betty

    A quilt will warm your body and comfort your soul.

    http://notesfrommoosehaven.blogspot.com

  8. #8
    Super Member Jeanne S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Tulsa, Ok
    Posts
    4,073
    I have the littlest Babylock machine, The Audrey, and it is a great traveler. Only weighs 6 lbs.
    I just want to spend the rest of my life laughing.

  9. #9
    mac
    mac is offline
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    California, USA
    Posts
    1,263
    Several of the ladies at the senior center have opted to get the lighter machines to take to class. These machines all have plastic gears and even though they sew nicely at first, it seems that over time their stitches don't stay really true. One example I can think of at the top of my head, is that the straight stitch started stitching at an angle. If you think of a model (woman) who walks heel to toe and liken this to a normal straight stitch, then think of an ordinary woman (non-model) who walks with uneven steps, this would be how the stitches would look on the smaller, cheaper machines. I don't know quite how to explain it any better. It did not seem to bother most of the owners, but it would drive me crazy. The other thing I noticed was that the tension seemed to go screwy more often than on a regular machine.

    Please understand, I am not knocking all of the smaller machines, I am just drawing attention to the things that I have noticed and the complaints that I have heard and am suggesting that you check the reviews carefully.

    If you are lucky enough to find a featherweight, it is still my go to machine to sew on and it is lighter than most machines, dependable and they rarely have any high-cost repair bills.

  10. #10
    Super Member grann of 6's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Glenmoore, PA
    Posts
    7,649
    Blog Entries
    1
    The Babylocks don't have plastic gears, even the cheaper ones.

  11. #11
    mac
    mac is offline
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    California, USA
    Posts
    1,263
    Quote Originally Posted by grann of 6 View Post
    The Babylocks don't have plastic gears, even the cheaper ones.
    That is good to know. Thanks.

  12. #12
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    1,102
    Quote Originally Posted by Onebyone View Post
    I have a very old Janome Jem Gold. It's wonderful, no problems at all. I think any of the smaller Janomes will be a great machine.
    I agree with you on the Janome Jem Gold, which I think is a model 600, but think the Platinum would be great because of the needle up - down feature, which the Gold does not have. I was on the lookout for those machines until I stumbled across my first Singer Slant 301. My first encounter with the Jem Gold was with the county 4-H. Just remember to clean often to remove lint from the bobbin area, especially under the Race. There are other desirable Janome models in model numbers higher than the 700s, but I cannot remember numbers. I bought one and was given one, both of which I cleaned, lubed, and passed on to people who needed them. One of those machines, I paid about 30 dollars for, the largest expense driving to the city and back to pick it up at at the Goodwill.com online pickup store in Tacoma, WA.

  13. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    California
    Posts
    414
    I have a Janome Gem … perfect for classes and to take to sewing parties!

  14. #14
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    8,205
    I have a Janome DC 1050 but haven't used it for over 2 years when I upgraded. I liked it for a beginner machine and it's certainly light enough to take to class. It was decent, and sold me on Janome, but I don't know that I'd recommend it above others. I think the Jem has more happy users. Or the featherweight if all you want it for is portabliltiy and piecing.

  15. #15
    Super Member chris_quilts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    leavenworth, ks
    Posts
    3,092
    Blog Entries
    19
    If I were looking for a lightweight portable machine, I'd try very hard to find a Singer 301. I have several of them and just love this model. It is a slant stitch, straight stitch only machine but very dependable & simple to use & clean. Both of my mostly nonsewing daughters can use them without too much guidance from me. My $.02 worth of advice.
    I meant to behave......but there were too many other options

  16. #16
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Van. Island, BC
    Posts
    1,303
    Blog Entries
    1
    I have this machine, it is just OK. I do now have the wonky stitches that mac mentions and seems I'm always messing with it. I replaced an old Brother machine, really wish I had bought another Brother. I would never buy it again.
    True4uca

  17. #17
    Super Member Aurora's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Somewhere in Time
    Posts
    2,615
    Blog Entries
    2
    I have a 301A that was my main machine until I could afford to purchase another machine. It is only 6 pounds heavier than the Featherweight, but I like its footprint and stability better. I also have a vintage New Home that is slightly heavier than the 301A. It is always in my van, ready to sew. I have purchased two new machines, a Singer, which I immediately sold, and a Janome, which resides in a corner of my sewing room. My preferred machine is a Viking 6430, which is very happy residing in my sewing room and is used daily. It weighs a huge 34 pounds and only travels with me three times a year for specific sewing sessions. You absolutely cannot go wrong with a 301 or 301A.
    Aurora

    "A dying culture invariably exhibits personal rudeness. Bad manners. Lack of consideration for others in minor matters. A loss of politeness, of gentle manners, is more significant than is a riot." -Robert A. Heinlein

  18. #18
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    1,102
    Quote Originally Posted by chris_quilts View Post
    If I were looking for a lightweight portable machine, I'd try very hard to find a Singer 301. I have several of them and just love this model. It is a slant stitch, straight stitch only machine but very dependable & simple to use & clean. Both of my mostly nonsewing daughters can use them without too much guidance from me. My $.02 worth of advice.
    I was walking through an upstairs area of a thrift store and from across the room saw the profile of a 301 slant. It had been there a while and no takers. I immediately loaded it into my cart, but had to haul it downstairs by hand. Same store, same area, I found the second one in a regular cabinet.

    I have sewn many baby gowns and a few donation quilt tops on it. For the baby gowns, there were small, narrow fabric ties that the 301 handled with ease. I found a canvas bag that looked like a briefcase shape, and it works perfectly for carrying the 301. The rolling sewing machine case I bought, ends up packed with my clothing and toiletries when I go to sewing retreats.
    Chris, I would say that your $.02 worth of advice is golden.

  19. #19
    Super Member amyjo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    North Dakota
    Posts
    2,534
    Blog Entries
    18
    I bought the janome jw8100 for my grandson to use. Lightweight needle updown no need for pedal good lighting many different stitches n only cost $270 free shipping

  20. #20
    Super Member QuiltnLady1's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    4,544
    I have the Janome 3160 -- I upgraded from the Gem Platinum because it had features like my Janome 7700. Don't think the 3160 is made any more but I like the 12 pound weight and its solid feel.
    QuiltnLady1

    When life gives you lemons, make lemonade.

  21. #21
    Super Member tuckyquilter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    1,652
    Blog Entries
    1
    I would buy anything but a plastic Janome. Long story. BUT I'll never buy another Janome of any kind.
    Jackie
    Lover of Scrappy, Chocolate and Wine

  22. #22
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Flagstaff, Arizona
    Posts
    6,541
    Thank you everyone for your honest opinion and feedback on the Janome DC1050. I am rethinking of purchasing one and going to look into the Babylock "Audrey" as it has all medal gears and that is important to me. Now I am somewhat confused on what I want but I sure do appreciate you all giving me your advice.

  23. #23
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    East Coast FL
    Posts
    272
    Have the Janome jem platinum 760. Love it. 12 lbs.

  24. #24
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    827
    I just bought as a gift for a teenage girl the Babylock BL9. For $100 it is a really nice machine. If I didn't have a stable already I would have one of those.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.