Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: Fees for Teaching

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    2

    Fees for Teaching

    Hello, I live in Upstate NY, the Finger Lakes region. I am thinking of starting to teach quilting and sewing. Starting with table runners and simple bags/tote bags. I how would I figure my teaching fees for the area of NY that I live in.

    thank-you DonnaF268

  2. #2
    Super Member Knitette's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    The Granite City, Scotland
    Posts
    1,626
    Welcome to the board.

    You need to figure out all your overheads first.

    Where will you be teaching - hire of room/hall or own house? If at home, will you need extra home-owners insurance in case someone breaks something or hurts themselves?
    Would they be bringing their own machine or are you providing them? What about materials - will they supply all these themselves or will this be included in the cost?
    How many would you be teaching at a time?

    Lots of things to consider before you can set a price. Good luck.
    Lang may yer lum reek. (I'm a knitter - hence - 'Knit-ette'. Confuses a lot of people!)

  3. #3
    Super Member pumpkinpatchquilter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    NE Ohio
    Posts
    1,375
    I think it depends on a lot of factors. I'm teaching a class to friends and am only asking $10 a person to cover workbooks and samples - but I got a great deal on a room and am doing it more for fun. If I continue this class monthly or even bi-weekly I may have to up the cost. Now, I taught a paper piecing class at a local quilt shop at the fee was $20 per person plus they had to buy the pattern and materials. Half of that class fee went to me and the other half to the shop owner. Another was a hand quilting class and the fee was $15. NOW - I took an applique class at the library and it was $3 per person. SO - fees vary depending on what the class involves, what materials will be needed to run the class, and how much overhead has to be balanced out. Obviously I can charge a lot less teaching on my own than at a quilt shop because I don't have to make money for the shop! But when I rent a room to teach I have to cover the cost of the room and supplies to teach and if I want to make something hourly I have to figure that in too. If fees get to extravagant it deters people from attending.

    Not an easy question to answer here! Good luck to you!
    Valerie Smith - pumpkinpatchquilter
    Obsessed Quilter and APQS Long Arm Machine Quilter
    www.pumpkinpatchquilter.com

  4. #4
    Super Member mom-6's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    6,498
    You might check out the going rate for classes at the quilt shops in your general area.

  5. #5
    Power Poster feline fanatic's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    10,115
    Are you even sure there is a viable market in your area for such services? The Finger Lakes has an active guild that offers classes and such to members. http://www.lake2lakequiltguild.com/index.htm

  6. #6
    Senior Member RonieM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Stanley, NY
    Posts
    529
    Hi Donna,

    Welcome! I also live in the Finger Lakes Region in NY. In the past I have taught classes locally. Unfortunately, I just don't have much time for it now. I would suggest getting in touch with the local quilt shops and see if they have a need for new teachers. Maybe make an appointment to talk to the shop owner and bring samples of your work. What shop you are teaching for often determines fees. For instance, one shop I worked for tacked on $5 to my per person fee of $20 to cover the cost of electricity - so the cost for the class was $25. Another shop I taught for did not add anything to the per person fee, as the workshop got customers in the door and of course they bought while they were there. Yet another shop would not charge any more than $25 per person, no matter what the class was.

    You might also consider getting newsletters from area shops, they will tell you what the shops are charging for classes and what the market will bear.

    Another bonus to teaching at local shops is that they do the advertizing for you. Class samples made out of fabrics carried in the shops always peaks an interest. I taught a purse class for one shop and they insisted I use fabrics that were in their shop. I could either buy the fabric and keep the sample when done, or they would provide me with the materials for the sample and I would make it, but it would be their property.

    Hope this information helps in some way. Good luck to you!

  7. #7
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    21,925
    Another way of looking at it -

    What would you be willing to pay for one of the classes you are thinking about teaching?

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    2
    thanks for all the replies. yes I am looking to teach at a quilt shop, not as an independent teacher. I want to be ready with an idea for a fee if I am asked to teach. again thanks for your thoughts.

  9. #9
    Super Member petthefabric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Eastern Madera County, Ca
    Posts
    1,672
    In the central Calif area there are different prices. The lowest is $25. At some the teacher gets it all and at others, the store takes a %. Some LQS will allow cancel of class at a minimum level. Others don't. Guilds with local teachers usually charge $25. Unless you have a following, 4 people in the class is a good size. Some guilds are taking teaching seriously and offer out of the area teachers at $50-$65 for 6-8 hours. The cost of putting on the class and lecture at the guild meeting can by up to $1600 so often the guild absorbs some of the cost.

    I love teaching classes. The adult students learn a lot from each other, have more fun in the class with 3+ in the class. I have a minimum of 2-3 and charge $40/student. I get the whole fee. The class set up allows 10 students.

  10. #10
    Super Member carolaug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Behind my sewing machine
    Posts
    7,206
    Blog Entries
    4
    It hard to say on what to charge. There are so many free classes on line. Sadly many are starting to charge. I was lucky enough to learn from so many for free...if not I probably would not have started quilting. I am so happy that there are so many willing to share their love of quilting and knowlege to others.

  11. #11
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Posts
    11,902
    Blog Entries
    1
    generally the shops you are going to teach in have their own policies/pricing set up so you need to talk the them- one of our shops here charged customers $25 for 2 hour classes, $45 for 4 hour classes and $20 each for multiple day (2hr) classes- so if you had to go in say-4 weeks in a row for a 2 hour class it cost you a total of $80...the shop kept the first $5 from each student-the teacher received the rest- another (much less popular) shop - the owner would decide what to charge for each individual class- then pay the teacher minimum wage-hourly the shop kept the rest- I've taught in many shops over the years- every one of them determined, had a set amount what would be charged for each class- I was never able to go in & say- I would like to charge $30 per person to teach this class...well, I could say it - but It didn't mean anything- they would tell me---this is what 'we' charge for this type of class....and this is what we pay you. I know with well known, published, traveling teachers they do set their own rates/requirements- but until you reach that level you have to go with the flow (and what the shop policy is)
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

  12. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    356
    I would ask the LQS you are going to teach at, what was the amount charged in the past, or ask other LQS. I teach classes through community ed and they have a set fee.

  13. #13
    Super Member petthefabric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Eastern Madera County, Ca
    Posts
    1,672
    Free is nice. But somehow the person teaching needs an income to live on. If they don't charge for the Tute, they get an income some other way. A laborer is worthy of a wage.

    I'm retired with a fixed income that needs to be supplemented. I love quilting and my work is worthy of a wage.

    Some shops in my area dictate the fee for classes and 75% are for beginners. I kept looking around with my portfolio until I found a shop willing to charge more for intermediate and advance classes.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.