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Thread: Found an Antique Frame and Need Ideas for Properly Loading Quilts

  1. #1
    Super Member BettyGee's Avatar
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    I decided that I wanted to try my hand at hand quilting my latest project and remembered that I had inherited a quilt frame from my aunt in the late sixties. Sure enough there in the garage my husband found the Dritz quilt frame, two in fact plus a lap frame, that have made the trip from Illinois to Massachusetts to Colorado. He put it together, I cleaned it and lemon oiled it and it looks fantastic. How to fasten the quilt to the bars? There are multiple little tack holes in the bars so I assume that was how it was done way back. Does anyone know, other than C clamps, how to anchor the quilt without damaging the fabric? Any suggestions will be greatly appreciated. This just proves that being a "pack rat" can sometimes prove to be a good thing.

  2. #2
    Google Goddess craftybear's Avatar
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    wow, here you had it in the garage and transporting from move to move

    what else is hiding in the garage???

  3. #3
    Spring's Avatar
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    Well that is just awesome!
    Im trying to talk my husband into making me one that I saw in a movie.

  4. #4
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    One I remember seeing had a fabric covered long piece of wood that clamped onto the material, then had a hand clamp that held it onto the frame. But with your holes already there..can't think how they worked. Though I'd probably recognize one as soon as I saw it.

  5. #5
    Super Member justwannaquilt's Avatar
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    Does the quilt roll onto the bars of a hand quilting fram like it does a machine quilting frame? Sorry for the mindless question but I am not familiar with hand quilting or the frames used to do it.

    If the quilt rolls onto the bars as it does in machine quilting why not just make leaders for the frame? this will preserve the bars AND your fabric from further damage!

  6. #6
    Super Member BettyGee's Avatar
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    That is a terrific idea and on which might be the answer. I knew you folks would have the solutions. Thanks!!

  7. #7
    Super Member BettyGee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by craftybear
    you might start a new thread with your ? on the Dritz quilt frame so others can see it and help you out faster

    to be specific in your wording for the subject line

    How to fasten the quilt to the bars on the Dritz quilt frame? Need Help Please

    Quote Originally Posted by BettyGee
    I decided that I wanted to try my hand at hand quilting my latest project and remembered that I had inherited a quilt frame from my aunt in the late sixties. Sure enough there in the garage my husband found the Dritz quilt frame, two in fact plus a lap frame, that have made the trip from Illinois to Massachusetts to Colorado. He put it together, I cleaned it and lemon oiled it and it looks fantastic. How to fasten the quilt to the bars? There are multiple little tack holes in the bars so I assume that was how it was done way back. Does anyone know, other than C clamps, how to anchor the quilt without damaging the fabric? Any suggestions will be greatly appreciated. This just proves that being a "pack rat" can sometimes prove to be a good thing.
    Thanks, Crafty Bear. I'll do that, makes more sense to do it that way.

  8. #8
    Super Member grann of 6's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BettyGee
    I decided that I wanted to try my hand at hand quilting my latest project and remembered that I had inherited a quilt frame from my aunt in the late sixties. Sure enough there in the garage my husband found the Dritz quilt frame, two in fact plus a lap frame, that have made the trip from Illinois to Massachusetts to Colorado. He put it together, I cleaned it and lemon oiled it and it looks fantastic. How to fasten the quilt to the bars? There are multiple little tack holes in the bars so I assume that was how it was done way back. Does anyone know, other than C clamps, how to anchor the quilt without damaging the fabric? Any suggestions will be greatly appreciated. This just proves that being a "pack rat" can sometimes prove to be a good thing.
    May I come visit you and help you clean your garage?

  9. #9
    Super Member BettyGee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by craftybear
    wow, here you had it in the garage and transporting from move to move

    what else is hiding in the garage???
    There are some wonderful things out there. There is an apple picking ladder from Massachusetts that is easily early 1900's, not very sturdy but it is old and beautiful. Some day we'll have to climb up in the rafters and look for other treasures.

  10. #10
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BettyGee
    Quote Originally Posted by craftybear
    you might start a new thread with your ? on the Dritz quilt frame so others can see it and help you out faster

    to be specific in your wording for the subject line

    How to fasten the quilt to the bars on the Dritz quilt frame? Need Help Please

    Quote Originally Posted by BettyGee
    I decided that I wanted to try my hand at hand quilting my latest project and remembered that I had inherited a quilt frame from my aunt in the late sixties. Sure enough there in the garage my husband found the Dritz quilt frame, two in fact plus a lap frame, that have made the trip from Illinois to Massachusetts to Colorado. He put it together, I cleaned it and lemon oiled it and it looks fantastic. How to fasten the quilt to the bars? There are multiple little tack holes in the bars so I assume that was how it was done way back. Does anyone know, other than C clamps, how to anchor the quilt without damaging the fabric? Any suggestions will be greatly appreciated. This just proves that being a "pack rat" can sometimes prove to be a good thing.
    Thanks, Crafty Bear. I'll do that, makes more sense to do it that way.
    actually, the more sensible thing would be to edit the title of this topic so it's all together in one place. if you need help with that, any moderator can help.

    in fact ... i just did. :lol:

  11. #11
    Super Member quiltlonger's Avatar
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    When I helped my mom we just used "thumb tacks" every couple of inches on the two sides rolled to center then SHE quilted. I only helped to put on (we used the C clamps to hold the frame with quilt attached to side bars) the whole thing was positioned over 4 dining room chairs and we crawled under to get in living room. We all were very happy when a quilt was finished. I now own a long arm and use that. Her sister used a leader strip that she basted to quilt top then slipped over her rails because gave you slivers was so full of "tack" holes -her frame was originally used for drying lace curtains had mini-nails all around entire 4 pieces was a great,great grandmothers.Think thats still in moms attic.

  12. #12
    Google Goddess craftybear's Avatar
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    you can use the cool ladder to hang quilts on

    Quote Originally Posted by BettyGee
    Quote Originally Posted by craftybear
    wow, here you had it in the garage and transporting from move to move

    what else is hiding in the garage???
    There are some wonderful things out there. There is an apple picking ladder from Massachusetts that is easily early 1900's, not very sturdy but it is old and beautiful. Some day we'll have to climb up in the rafters and look for other treasures.

  13. #13
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    Make sure your frame is square & clamp bars together. You tack the quilt on all 4 rails using thumb tacks. As you quilt, you roll up the quilt on 2 parallel bars, remove tacks from side bars, & continue quilting.

  14. #14
    community benefactor Parrothead's Avatar
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    On our big quilt frame (which I sold and am now sorry) we had strips of ticking (or any heavy fabric) nailed to the edges. Then we used safety pins to pin those strips to the quilt. This is so you can get the edges quilted. After you roll the first time, this is covered.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Parrothead
    On our big quilt frame (which I sold and am now sorry) we had strips of ticking (or any heavy fabric) nailed to the edges. Then we used safety pins to pin those strips to the quilt. This is so you can get the edges quilted. After you roll the first time, this is covered.
    This is how we did it.

  16. #16
    Super Member BettyGee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by grann of 6
    Quote Originally Posted by BettyGee
    I decided that I wanted to try my hand at hand quilting my latest project and remembered that I had inherited a quilt frame from my aunt in the late sixties. Sure enough there in the garage my husband found the Dritz quilt frame, two in fact plus a lap frame, that have made the trip from Illinois to Massachusetts to Colorado. He put it together, I cleaned it and lemon oiled it and it looks fantastic. How to fasten the quilt to the bars? There are multiple little tack holes in the bars so I assume that was how it was done way back. Does anyone know, other than C clamps, how to anchor the quilt without damaging the fabric? Any suggestions will be greatly appreciated. This just proves that being a "pack rat" can sometimes prove to be a good thing.
    May I come visit you and help you clean your garage?
    You are most welcome, who knows what we might find?

  17. #17
    Super Member BettyGee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Parrothead
    On our big quilt frame (which I sold and am now sorry) we had strips of ticking (or any heavy fabric) nailed to the edges. Then we used safety pins to pin those strips to the quilt. This is so you can get the edges quilted. After you roll the first time, this is covered.
    I like this idea alot! My cross stitch scroll frame has that so you can baste the fabric and then roll as you stitch. Your idea would work just like that for a quilt, thank you so very much.

  18. #18
    Super Member BettyGee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by craftybear
    you can use the cool ladder to hang quilts on

    Quote Originally Posted by BettyGee
    Quote Originally Posted by craftybear
    wow, here you had it in the garage and transporting from move to move

    what else is hiding in the garage???
    There are some wonderful things out there. There is an apple picking ladder from Massachusetts that is easily early 1900's, not very sturdy but it is old and beautiful. Some day we'll have to climb up in the rafters and look for other treasures.
    Crafty Bear, you are amazing! I like your ideas and using the ladder to hang quilts on is a fun idea. My husband said to tell you about the two handled saw we have from about the same era. If you find yourself in Colorado come by and we'll find a tree to cut down and make ourselves some quilt frames; perhaps even a ladder or two. Seriously, thank you very much for your help.

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