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Thread: Frugal or Extravagant?

  1. #76
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    What is a good brand of basting spray? I am going Back to the states in October and am already starting my list of things to bring back. Suitcase weight is a problem but everything heavy or fragile in my suitcase gets wrapped in batting. I keep clothes in the states at my daughters so I have more room for fabric, thread, notions etc. I always have the best time stocking up on my trips and a couple of the LQS's know me and give me great discounts when I come.

  2. #77
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    I worked for a company that made computer bds & the quality depended on the standards set by the mfgr. For example IBM has higher stds for their bds than HP does, etc. So although we made the same product (boards) the quality was different. I have retired this year but worked in the quality dept. there for 24 yrs. Also the food industry & that was the same. The label that went on the can was determined by the amt of foreign objects in the sample can. They do all taste the same though. I, also, like others buy the best quality tools for quilting that I can afford & shop as cheaply as possible.

  3. #78
    Super Member SewExtremeSeams's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chips88 View Post
    i do not have a harbor freight near by. i do not have a fabric shop either. only walmart. i do not have a long arm to do quilting of my quilts. we have nothing in this area. wish i knew how to advertize that we need these things hear.
    I ordered my blades online from Harbor Freight. I ordered about 2 dozen packages at once. Even with the cost of shipping it is so much less expensive than buying the Olfa blades.

    The reason I buy them: because they work the same (for me, anyway) as the pricey Olfa. If they didn't I would have to buy the Olfa blades.

    I like having extra packages on hand and due to the low cost I enjoy giving a package or two to new quilters or a swap partner (if they use them).

    Linda

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  4. #79
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    This Board has the BEST information ever!!!

  5. #80
    Super Member kiffie2413's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lori S View Post
    There are certain fabric designers that I can say when I see their fabric .. I never look at the price on the bolt, as I just have to have it. Peggy Toole has some of the most irresistable fabrics I have ever seen.
    As for tools and supplies...
    1. spray basting ... having used some off brands that either left me cleaning my needle ever 2 minutes, or didn't adhere, or smelled bad..
    2. Invisable thread .. just not worth the frusration to go "off brand".
    3. Specialty presser feet... I stick with the manufactures .
    And yes .. I am a scissor snob!
    Have to agree with the basting spray...505 is the only one I will use! I order it from here:
    http://www.sewforless.com/item/505_T...OUND_ONLY/7391 this is for the large cans, and the price is amazing! This past order I went with the option to order 6 cans. I have always had great success with the spray, and the customer service from them has always been super.
    Kif
    Always do right. This will gratify some people and astonish the rest~Mark Twain

  6. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by bearisgray View Post
    There are some things I'm willing to spend the money to have the 'best' that I know about -

    Gingher scissors, for example.

    There are some things that I'm more interested in getting 'adequate' for less money -

    Those rotary cutter blades from ?? for $1.98 for two. (Got some a while ago - but don't remember name now)

    How about you?

    ETA: But it seems like something newer and better is always becoming available. WAAAAAH!
    I use a Fiskars handle but it will accept Olfa blades, so I use either one, but I find that within an hour of using a new blade I have created "no cut" zones. I assume I am hitting the plastic ruler. Re-sharpening helps a little, but this is still one of the more expensive parts of my quilting obsession - oops, hobby. How long do people find the Harbor Freight blades last? (I don't even try to cut more than two layers of cloth)

  7. #82
    Super Member Neesie's Avatar
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    Your "no cut" zones may be on your cutting mat, instead of the blade. I've noticed certain areas of my mat will almost always cause a skip. Time for a new mat? NO WAY!!!
    Neesie


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  8. #83
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    I find that even Olfa blades - actually quite a few of them - brand new - straight out of the package - have a 'no cut' spot about three threads wide -and it's always at the same interval - so I'm reasonably sure that the blade has a 'no cut' spot on it

  9. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by bearisgray View Post
    I find that even Olfa blades - actually quite a few of them - brand new - straight out of the package - have a 'no cut' spot about three threads wide -and it's always at the same interval - so I'm reasonably sure that the blade has a 'no cut' spot on it
    This has been my experience also.

  10. #85
    Super Member QuiltnLady1's Avatar
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    I go for quality at a good price. I use Olfa blades from Joanne's on sale -- I have several Olfa cutters (all more than 7 years old) and working wonderfully (love the 60mm ergonomic for most jobs and the 18mm for ripping) -- the F&P that I won last year, I use for cutting paper because it does not feel good in my hands. I have a couple pairs of Ginghers, 2 of the microserrated blade scissors and the rest Fiskars because they fit my very sore hands the best.

    I try to do quality on a budget -- I find that buying cheap costs too much in the long run because I keep having to replace it.
    QuiltnLady1

    When life gives you lemons, make lemonade.

  11. #86
    Senior Member Swan Song's Avatar
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    I was raised with 2 DBs and 2 DSs, my family had a modest income. Dad worked Mom was at home. We got hand me downs and my DGM made our "special occasion clothes". I learned to sew as a teen and started to make my own clothes and babysat my butt off for other things I wanted. We never had a lot of extras. I guess that has carried on to adulthood for me. Still I believe in buying a quality that will last within my means. I shop sales and use coupons. I will compare prices and figure in shipping vs sales tax and gas to go buy things locally. I watch which shops adjust shipping and which charge their full shipping. If it's something I simply must have there is always an extra shift I can work.

    So I guess color me fugal. I buy quality especially for my quilting tools but I do shop around. It's a little extra time to do so but in the end I am generally happy with my purchase. I find what works best for some people don't always work best for me so I go with what I like. I have a pair of Gingher scissors because my first quilting instructor said they were a must. I bought the lightweight version, cheaper with a coupon and easier on my hand. I have used them rarely. LOL If I get something I hate I won't buy that brand again.

    If I have trouble with skipping when rotary cutting (I also use Olfa rotary cutter and mats) and the blade is new or almost new I soak my mat. Someone at a quilting class I took told me about self healing mats needing to be soaked. I found this discussion of care and fixing mats to be really helpful. http://www.generations-quilt-pattern...tting-mat.html I am still using my original mat which is now 12 years old!
    You haven't had enough coffee until you can thread a sewing machine while it's running.

    Those who wish to sing, always find a song. ~Swedish Proverb

  12. #87
    Super Member burchquilts's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by QuiltE View Post
    And I'm sure as she waited to save enough, that she had many pleasant dreams of that coat ... and then oh, the pride in wearing it long after!!

    What a different world today ... the disposable society, seldom thinks about longevity and wear and tear! More so, something that can be worn for a year or two (and for some, just a season) and then toss it! Or hard goods that will do the job for a short time and then onwards to something else.
    My DH & I were just talking about this the other day. Do TV repairmen even exist anymore?
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  13. #88
    Super Member burchquilts's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bearisgray View Post
    I find that even Olfa blades - actually quite a few of them - brand new - straight out of the package - have a 'no cut' spot about three threads wide -and it's always at the same interval - so I'm reasonably sure that the blade has a 'no cut' spot on it
    And is it just me or do the rest of you notice how that thread or two is as strong as steel? I'll feel my cutter skip, think "No biggie" & then when I go to pull the rest of the fabric away, it won't budge!
    (`v)
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    (.(. (..`..♥ rebecca

  14. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by burchquilts View Post
    And is it just me or do the rest of you notice how that thread or two is as strong as steel? I'll feel my cutter skip, think "No biggie" & then when I go to pull the rest of the fabric away, it won't budge!
    Those uncut threads are very tenacious - and just won't snap - they will either pull the material along with it - or if they are willing to break, they create a long pulled thread - on the cut piece, of course.

  15. #90
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by burchquilts View Post
    My DH & I were just talking about this the other day. Do TV repairmen even exist anymore?

    They hang out with the Maytag man!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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  16. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by QuiltnLady1 View Post
    I go for quality at a good price. I use Olfa blades from Joanne's on sale -- I have several Olfa cutters (all more than 7 years old) and working wonderfully (love the 60mm ergonomic for most jobs and the 18mm for ripping) -- the F&P that I won last year, I use for cutting paper because it does not feel good in my hands. I have a couple pairs of Ginghers, 2 of the microserrated blade scissors and the rest Fiskars because they fit my very sore hands the best.

    I try to do quality on a budget -- I find that buying cheap costs too much in the long run because I keep having to replace it.
    There are some things that "cheap" just does not work for (incl paper clips and post it notes). I abandoned my Olfa rotary cutter, as I recall, because there wasn't enough protection from slicing myself along with the fabric. The Fiskars gives me a fighting chance to survive my loss of attention moments, tho I have had it close up twice while I was cutting, recently.

  17. #92
    Super Member nhweaver's Avatar
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    I used to be a "quanity is better than quality" advocate, and have filled up the sewing room/garbage can with cheap thread, cheap rippers, cheap scissors, cheap fabric over the years. For the last few years, I buy quality, on sale of course, I also try not to buy anything "made in China". It seems that my need for "stuff" has been reduced, as when I see the "made in China" sticker, I put it back. The only time it comes home with me is when there is no substitute easily found.
    If life gives you lemons, make a margarita.

  18. #93
    Super Member starshine's Avatar
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    Frugal or Extravagant. First of all frugal does not mean cheap. Frugal means getting a good value, or making good use of what you have, and not being wasteful. I am frugal.
    I look for things on sale, especially if it is something I know I am going to need but don't have to have it immediately. I can take my time and watch for a sale, or if it isn't going to ever be on sale save up for it,similar to the example of the cashmere coat, but most things retail will eventually be on sale. LQS may not mark down fabrics but may offer a percent off, or a free fq as a special. Fabric if it is too thin, or woven to loose it isn't worth putting into a quilt even at fifty cents a yard, as it won't hold up too long. If I am going to invest time in it, then I would want it to last long enough to be of use to recipient. If I need something I'll only need once the least it costs as long as it lasts the one time the better. And if one buys expensive fabric, and uses the leftovers or passes them on, frugal, vs. one who buys cheap fabric and tosses out the leftover strips, and pieces, they are wasteful. Even if they wouldn't be a good use in a time consuming quilt, someone could use them for something, even a teacher for art projects/classes.
    The bells and whistles, whether appliance, vehicle etc. if you would never use them, then to buy it for status is a waste. But if they are things one would use and it makes it a better experience it is not a waste of money.

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