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Thread: Fusible batting??????

  1. #1
    jme
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    Fusible batting??????

    I've never used this stuff before but I picked up a package at the thrift store. So have you used it? What are you're thoughts? Good, bad? Is it tricky to use or hard to quilt? Thanks for all your help!
    JME

    Fabric makes me happy!

  2. #2
    Senior Member omaluvs2quilt's Avatar
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    I used it on some placemats I made with the grandkids for Christmas presents, worked pretty good. Not sure how it would work on a whole quilt though.

  3. #3
    Super Member Judith1005's Avatar
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    Love it!! It's expensive by the yard. I like using it for smaller projects. Parts of stuffed animals, wall hangings. It quilts wonderfully.
    My little shinning stars. Brantley, Kaylynn, and Emmalee

  4. #4
    jme
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    Quote Originally Posted by Judith1005 View Post
    Love it!! It's expensive by the yard. I like using it for smaller projects. Parts of stuffed animals, wall hangings. It quilts wonderfully.

    Thanks, I have a crib quilt I'm working on that I was thinking of using it for.
    JME

    Fabric makes me happy!

  5. #5
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    I've only used the fusible on small projects, like the Wonder Wallet. It worked great ! I would never try it on a quilt, since I love quilt basting spray.

  6. #6
    Super Member Rumbols's Avatar
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    Great question. I have used it on purses, totes, wall hangings, etc. but never in a quilt. Seems to get to stiff for a bed quilt. I am sure there are lots of quilters who have used it for more than I have. I will be watching for their answers too. Thanks for posting.

  7. #7
    Super Member Crqltr's Avatar
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    I like it for small projects, place mats, runners, ect. Not for a quilt tho, gets way to flat and stiff for my liking.

  8. #8
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    I use Hobbs Fusible batting for all my quilts and I love it. It makes putting the quilt sandwich together a pleasure: I can do a lap quilt in an hour! It is easy, drapes nicely and is excellent for machine quilting. It can be re-fused easily and is nice and soft when the quilt is washed. In my last quilt I used two layers for more warmth and am very pleased with the result.
    Maggie in Jerusalem
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  9. #9
    Super Member virtualbernie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rumbols View Post
    Great question. I have used it on purses, totes, wall hangings, etc. but never in a quilt. Seems to get to stiff for a bed quilt. I am sure there are lots of quilters who have used it for more than I have. I will be watching for their answers too. Thanks for posting.
    Are you thinking of fusible fleece? Fleece would be stiff for a bed quilt but fusible batting is different.
    Bernie

  10. #10
    Super Member AnnieH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maggiem View Post
    I use Hobbs Fusible batting for all my quilts and I love it. It makes putting the quilt sandwich together a pleasure: I can do a lap quilt in an hour! It is easy, drapes nicely and is excellent for machine quilting. It can be re-fused easily and is nice and soft when the quilt is washed. In my last quilt I used two layers for more warmth and am very pleased with the result.
    Me too with the Hobbs. Have just finished my second double sized quilt. I can even do it on the kitchen table. Give it a go.
    Annie

  11. #11
    Super Member Ripped on Scotch's Avatar
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    I have used the fusible batting for some baby quilts, wall hangings and smaller stuff. I have not tried it on anything bigger. I have access to a LA so I tend to do anything bigger then that on the LA.

  12. #12
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
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    I did not like it for bed size quilts. Spray basting gave me much better results.

  13. #13
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    I have never used it and have wondered how it would be possible to iron it on a full - queen size quilt.
    Another Phyllis
    This life is the only one you get - enjoy it before you lose it.

  14. #14
    Super Member gramajo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jingle View Post
    I have never used it and have wondered how it would be possible to iron it on a full - queen size quilt.
    Ironing it for a full size quilt was a pain in the rear.

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    I've used the Hobbs fusible on wall hangings and lap quilts. It's wonderful. Once you wash the quilt, the fusible is gone.
    Barb

  16. #16
    Super Member QuiltnLady1's Avatar
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    I have used the Hobbs fusible batting for baby and lap quilts -- love it. Haven't tried it for anything larger.

    A word of warning -- don't iron it if it is wrinkled (ask me how I know -- LOL). It is a mess to clean up (sigh).
    QuiltnLady1

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    I used it for a purse and I liked it . But for my large round Christmas table topper I spray basted and can say that I like it better than the fusible.

  18. #18
    Power Poster joyce888's Avatar
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    I used it on some table runners and really liked it; also plan on using it for mug rugs.
    Joyce

    Four things you can't recover: The stone.....after the throw. The word......after its said. The occasion.....after its missed. The time......after its gone

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    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    some people love it- some people hate it- it is a personal choice- try it out & see how you like it.
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

  20. #20
    jme
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    Thanks for all the helpful info. I love this place!
    JME

    Fabric makes me happy!

  21. #21
    Super Member thepolyparrot's Avatar
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    I love Hobbs Fusible - crawling around on the floor to iron it (TWICE! Once for the quilt top and once for the batting! ACK!) is not fun.

    But I have made a waist-high 8' square basting table out of sawhorses and 2x4"s and 4'x8' sheets of OSB ply split lengthwise and basting is now much easier, whether I'm ironing, pinning or tag-basting. It's still no real joy to baste a quilt, but I try to set up the table and do a bunch of quilts all at the same time, and even though it's a pain in the neck to set up, my knees and back aren't screaming at me for the next week.

    The Hobbs Fusible feels stiff when you've ironed it, but I think that that's actually an advantage when you're free-motion quilting - you can push the quilt around more easily when it's not flopping around, limp.

    And it softens up after only one laundering - I can't tell the difference between a quilt made with fusible and a quilt made with Hobbs Premium or Heirloom after it's been washed. I really love the stuff!

    Connecting Threads has all their batting on sale right now - 30% off and free shipping on orders over $50:
    http://www.connectingthreads.com/too...v--BattingSale

    I wish they made the fusible in the 120x120" size.

  22. #22
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    I did some crib and 1 lap size. Cribs worked very well; I think I won't do anything larger in the future.
    I domake fairly large cribs, smaller through than a lap

  23. #23
    Power Poster mighty's Avatar
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    Have not heard of this, I will have to check it out. Thank you for info.

  24. #24
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    One quilt shop I frequent, only sells the Hobbs Fusible, have not tried it. Since I have to lay my quilts on my basement carpet and have a burn mark on it, have stayed away from it. Maybe I am missing something. I am always happy to get the quilt sandwiched together and start quilting.

  25. #25
    Super Member Helen S's Avatar
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    I'm new to quilting and have made a 24" square wall quilt. I've just used Tailor brand Quilter's Fusible Batting for the first time. (In fact, this is the first quilted item I've ever used ANY batting on and it the fusible batting seemed the easiest choice.

    So far, I've only steamed the quilt top and backing to it. It seems quite stiff and slightly, hmmm, what's the term here? Puckered? Dimpled? all over, front and back. Does the stiffness go away when the quilting is done? Does the quilt have to be washed when finished to remove the glue or does it just get softer and allow the fabric to "fall away" from the batting. Maybe it's just not noticeable when done?

    Thanks!
    Helen

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