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Thread: Hanging Quilts

  1. #1
    Super Member Ruby the Quilter's Avatar
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    I would like to hang some of my quilts. One of the shops I was in used a decorative curtain rod and the rings with little clips to hang the quilt. Will the clips hurt the quilt? How do you hang your quilts?

  2. #2
    Member oz-quilter's Avatar
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    You could sew on a pocket on the back and hang it on a rod with decorative ends.

  3. #3
    Super Member quilterella's Avatar
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    No, the rings will not hurt your quilt, I use them all the time, including using them on a queen size. A sleeve is another option, but, I don't always know I'm going to hang a quilt when I make it, so, I use the rings and curtain rod. If it is a wall hanging or small decorative quilt that is only to be hung, then I use a sleeve or corner pockets for doweling.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by quilterella
    No, the rings will not hurt your quilt, I use them all the time, including using them on a queen size. A sleeve is another option, but, I don't always know I'm going to hang a quilt when I make it, so, I use the rings and curtain rod. If it is a wall hanging or small decorative quilt that is only to be hung, then I use a sleeve or corner pockets for doweling.
    I do this too, with the corner pockets or sleeve, caught in under the binding. That way, the corner pockets need no hand sewing, just fold a square in half and machine into the corners about an 1/8" in from the edge, then the binding covers the raw edge. With the sleeve, I hem the ends, fold in half then stitch the raw edge to the top of the quilt, 1/8" in, the folded part is hand sewn to the back. Bag it up slightly, ie not tight to the quilt, then the rod won't show on the front.

    Regarding the clips, I have a rather large 81" x 81" quilted door curtain hung from them - it hung for about a year in my French house and has now hung for nine months here in England and there's not a mark on it. :-D It's posted here, hanging in France http://www.quiltingboard.com/t-28426-1.htm :-D

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    The easy way is just to get push-pins and carefully work them through the fabric, then into the wall. They won't tear the thread, and will only leave tiny holes in the wall, and are easy to move. You can hang a queen-sized quilt with only 4 pins.

    This is what a lot of quilt shops do to display quilts.

  6. #6
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    i usually put either hanging sleeves or tabs on my quilts - but also skirt/pant hangers with (clothespin clamps) work well. i have a few of these hangers- i can clip 2 or 3 of them across the top of a quilt and hang it over curtain rods/closet rod, or even on the top of doors

  7. #7
    Super Member bisseau's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by quilterella
    No, the rings will not hurt your quilt, I use them all the time, including using them on a queen size. A sleeve is another option, but, I don't always know I'm going to hang a quilt when I make it, so, I use the rings and curtain rod. If it is a wall hanging or small decorative quilt that is only to be hung, then I use a sleeve or corner pockets for doweling.
    I like this idea.

  8. #8
    Super Member ptquilts's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gaigai
    The easy way is just to get push-pins and carefully work them through the fabric, then into the wall. They won't tear the thread, and will only leave tiny holes in the wall, and are easy to move. You can hang a queen-sized quilt with only 4 pins.

    This is what a lot of quilt shops do to display quilts.
    I would not do this - there is a lot of weight to hang from 4 pins. There can be a problem with sagging and stretching. For a wall quilt, sure, but not a bed quilt. I would not put my quilt in a shop that did this. Although I once bought an antique quilt that had been NAILED to the wall for display - had to borrow a hammer to get it down.

  9. #9
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    We use the clips when we go to quilt shows, they work great and have never damaged any quilt of ours.

    Lanny

  10. #10
    Super Member Maggiemay's Avatar
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    I have posted this photo before, but this is how I hang my quilts. I put a pushpin in the wall & hang the dowel on that.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  11. #11
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    I use those clips and haven't had any problems.
    Another thing that I use is used larger sewing machine needles or used long arm needles. If I want to hang a small quilt on a wall (lap sized or smaller) and I don't want to use a quilt hanger I position the quilt where I want it to be and use my old needles as anchors in the quilt. I push the used needles through the quilt at the corners and tap the needles into the wall. If the quilt needs extra support in the middle, I just use more needles. The quilt hangs straight because it is supported. I do take the quilts down every so often and re-hang them. When the machine needles are removed from the wall, there is hardly a mark in the wall and I've never had a quilt damaged. But, I've not used this on a larger sized quilt.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ptquilts
    Quote Originally Posted by gaigai
    The easy way is just to get push-pins and carefully work them through the fabric, then into the wall. They won't tear the thread, and will only leave tiny holes in the wall, and are easy to move. You can hang a queen-sized quilt with only 4 pins.

    This is what a lot of quilt shops do to display quilts.
    I would not do this - there is a lot of weight to hang from 4 pins. There can be a problem with sagging and stretching. For a wall quilt, sure, but not a bed quilt. I would not put my quilt in a shop that did this. Although I once bought an antique quilt that had been NAILED to the wall for display - had to borrow a hammer to get it down.
    I've done it for years, and have seen LOTS of shops do this. It works just fine and doesn't damage or stretch the quilt. But as the saying goes "Chaque a son gout". To each his own.

  13. #13
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    hanging a real quilt for any length of time is never a good thing...the weight alone will eventually put stress/strain on the seams. the binding can not withstand years of hanging from clips either unless you are able to rotate it every few months so it wears evenly.

    I have wooden hangers that have a slot for the binding to fit into and then the front screws down on the quilt. But I only hand smaller wall type quilts, not a huge queen or anything that heavy!

  14. #14
    Super Member Just Me...'s Avatar
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    I use the curtain rods and rings for some quilts and make hanging sleeves for others. Both methods work for me and I have never had a problem with the ring clips hurting my quilts. I have used the push pins before and ended up with small holes in my quilts.

  15. #15
    Super Member Ruby the Quilter's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the good information - now to get the curtain rod hung. First need to get rid of a very old piano that's on the wall. Anyone in the El Paso area want an old piano?

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