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Thread: Has anyone else had this problem?

  1. #1
    Super Member Ariannaquilts's Avatar
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    Has anyone else had this problem?

    I bought some fabric that absolutely was not inexpensive and I have never seen anything fray like this before. The fabric is Lori Whitlock's Happy Day by Riley Blake. I have never bought anything by Riley Blake before and although there are many fabrics that I absolutely love I don't believe I will ever again. I made a baby quilt for my god daughter's grand baby and finished quilting it only to discover that although I made sure there were no loose threads, I have red threads that frayed off somehow! I am so upset about this I don't know what to do? Anyone know any way of fixing this. I couldn't believe the threads coming out all over the place when I cut my binding. I have never even had this happen with fabrics from Joann's.
    Maria
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  2. #2
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    Can you post a picture so we know for sure what you saying?
    Were you using scant 1/4 inch seams?

  3. #3
    Power Poster feline fanatic's Avatar
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    Did you prewash the fabric before using it? I ask because prewashing will preshrink (as long as you dry with heat) and tighten the weave to discourage fraying. I have never had a fabric fray bad except gold lame and that was horrible. Prewashing won't help Lame because it is all synthetic.

  4. #4
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    I am really sorry to hear that as we assume that fabric designed by such a big name as
    Riley Blake would be OK. I think I would contract the seller and tell your experience-that should not happen.

  5. #5
    Super Member SusieQOH's Avatar
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    I've used Riley Blake fabrics and they've been wonderful. How frustrating for you! I agree about contacting the seller or the company. That stuff is expensive!

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    I just finished a quilt that frayed like crazy (it's at the longarmer, now). All fabrics were purchased at a quilt shop. The focus fabric was Moda. I did not prewash. I was surprised that the fabric behaved that way.

    Generally speaking, I'm no longer sure that quilt shop fabric is any higher quality than that found at the chain stores. They usually have prettier fabrics, though.

    bkay

  7. #7
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    I too believe, like bkay, that quality has been lowered as prices have risen......I would definitely let mfgr know that you r not pleased with their product. Perhaps a boycott would help turn this reduced quality situation around....it has worked in other areas.......

  8. #8
    Power Poster Onebyone's Avatar
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    If the red thread is underneath and you can see it in the quilt you can remove it. There is a tool for this.

    https://www.connectingthreads.com/to...c__D81949.html

    Moda increased their thread count and quilters complained it wasn't what they wanted and didn't buy it so Moda went back to the less thread count. It's not Moda's fault, the quilters did this to themselves.
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  9. #9
    Super Member Snooze2978's Avatar
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    I've had some batik fabrics that frayed like crazy and I starch my fabrics before I cut into them. Thought batiks were tighter weaved but not these I had the issue with. Also thought starching would cut down on the fraying too,.....again not so for these fabrics. Don't recall what brand they were though.
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Onebyone View Post
    Moda increased their thread count and quilters complained it wasn't what they wanted and didn't buy it so Moda went back to the less thread count. It's not Moda's fault, the quilters did this to themselves.
    That's interesting! I've noticed how badly some of the Moda fabrics fray, but I wonder why people complained when they tried to improve things.
    Lisa

  11. #11
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    That's disheartening about Moda's lower thread count. I'm glad I have so much of the old stuff.
    aka Gale

  12. #12
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    I have some riley blake fabric (from years ago) and had no fraying problems. Still have some and I used it in my box of strings quilt. Didn't notice a problem. Sorry you are suffering. And I will be on the look out for expensive fabric with loose weave.

  13. #13
    Power Poster Onebyone's Avatar
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    The higher thread count Moda didn't lasts long so if you have some you can tell the difference. If I remember right the new higher thread count was seen as stiffer and didn't have the feel of Moda. Moda went back to regular thread count of the older Moda. People have to be careful what they think they want, they may get it and regret it.
    I believe giving what I can will never cause me to be in need.
    Being cheap is not a badge of honor.
    My heroes are working people, paying their own way, taking care of their children and being decent human beings.

  14. #14
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    I don't buy expensive fabrics and never had that happen.
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    I had one fabric that I used in a quilt, fray like that. I realized early on that I had a problem. My solution was to sew my 1/4 inch seam, then sew a wavy seam inside that seam. I found that sewing a straight seam again let it continue to fray. The wavy seam held the fabric in place better. Did I really worry about ironing all my pieces perfectly? Nope. I felt I was lucky just to keep it together. FYI....I normally use a 2.2 stitch but backed it down to a 2.0 to help stop the fraying. I did have to recut a couple of pieces of fabric due to the fraying before I realized that I had such a big problem. I have Fray Stop but didn't want to take the time to put that on every raw edge.

    Edited to add: Since I was double sewing a lot of the seams, I just finger pressed all the seams instead of my normal pressing with the iron. There was extra bulk but by the time I finished long arming it, no one could tell there ever was a problem. It has been washed a lot of times and has seams that have ripped. I did use a pantograph that didn't leave very much open space so there would be strain on any of my seams. It was a learning curve.
    Last edited by Barb in Louisiana; 07-07-2018 at 04:49 PM.
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  16. #16
    Super Member Nanny's dollface's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Onebyone View Post
    If the red thread is underneath and you can see it in the quilt you can remove it. There is a tool for this.

    https://www.connectingthreads.com/to...c__D81949.html

    Moda increased their thread count and quilters complained it wasn't what they wanted and didn't buy it so Moda went back to the less thread count. It's not Moda's fault, the quilters did this to themselves.

    Wow, what timing to see this post! Thank-you for posting the link to the thread removing tool. I was quilting a gift quilt and low and behold there I see a navy blue thread showing underneath white fabric. Did not want to take out the seam. Just ordered this time saving tool!
    "I may not believe in what you say but will defend your right to say it"- Voltaire

  17. #17
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    I use a very fine point crochet hook, not sure of the number, but the ones that are used to make doilies with the fine, thin thread. The point is so small, you can insert between the weave or insert between the stitches in the seam, reach in and pull the thread out.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barb in Louisiana View Post
    I had one fabric that I used in a quilt, fray like that. I realized early on that I had a problem. My solution was to sew my 1/4 inch seam, then sew a wavy seam inside that seam. I found that sewing a straight seam again let it continue to fray. The wavy seam held the fabric in place better. Did I really worry about ironing all my pieces perfectly? Nope. I felt I was lucky just to keep it together. FYI....I normally use a 2.2 stitch but backed it down to a 2.0 to help stop the fraying. I did have to recut a couple of pieces of fabric due to the fraying before I realized that I had such a big problem. I have Fray Stop but didn't want to take the time to put that on every raw edge.

    Edited to add: Since I was double sewing a lot of the seams, I just finger pressed all the seams instead of my normal pressing with the iron. There was extra bulk but by the time I finished long arming it, no one could tell there ever was a problem. It has been washed a lot of times and has seams that have ripped. I did use a pantograph that didn't leave very much open space so there would be strain on any of my seams. It was a learning curve.
    With knowing what you know now - would you still use that fabric - or would you have replaced it with one that frayed a lot less?

  19. #19
    Super Member coopah's Avatar
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    Fraying is a major problem for me these days. It is time consuming and messy to snip off all the frayed ends after sewing. I buy from the quilt store locally and online. Once in awhile I find what I need at Hobby Lobby. I think it's the general quality overall that is lacking.

    Edited to add: Sometimes I do a "double seam," too, to try to help with the fraying. So far that has worked, but again, more time for something that should only have to be done once.
    Last edited by coopah; 07-08-2018 at 04:29 AM.
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  20. #20
    Super Member ptquilts's Avatar
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    I always just use a pin or needle to pick out stray threads that show through a light piece on the quilt. I often do it when I see them while hand quilting.

  21. #21
    mac
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    Wow, what an interesting thread. I have only had this problem when I use a really loose woven fabric. In the old days, back in the 70's, when it wasn't totally clear what fabric to use for quilting, I did have a problem. Usually I found washing and drying the fabric tightened the weave (more or less). Some tightened more than others and some didn't tighten at all. On my second quilt that I made, I had some problems of seams splitting apart. The fabric had to be really awful, as at that time, I was sewing 5/8" seams. It wasn't until some time later in the 80's that I started using 1/4" seams.

    I would definitely contact the manufacture about this problem. If they don't know that a problem has occurred, they can't fix it and they can't compensate you, either. There may be others in the same boat with this fabric problem for that run of fabric.

  22. #22
    Super Member peaceandjoy's Avatar
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    The worst fraying I have experienced was with licensed fabric (Eric Carle's Brown Bear and Hungry Caterpillar). It is terribly frustrating.

    I have found that careful cutting - squaring up the fabric so that there are not off grain threads to loosen - combined with starch helps a lot when handling fabric. The starch piece isn't going to help once a fabric is washed, though. So if it's in the seam allowance and fraying, once that quilt is washed, the starch won't be there to keep it in place.

    Since you've already quilted it and can't add "second" seam, could you add quilting just to the side of the seams to hold it in place? I don't know what else to suggest to correct the problem you are having in this piece.

    Regardless of what, if anything, you do to try to fix the problem in this quilt, I would contact the manufacturer to let them know. Send them pictures of a piece of the fabric, if you have a scrap, showing the fraying that you had to trim up as well as a picture of the threads that are migrating in the finished quilt.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by bearisgray View Post
    With knowing what you know now - would you still use that fabric - or would you have replaced it with one that frayed a lot less?
    It was a secondary fabric and matched perfectly. The smart thing I do now is look for those loosely woven fabrics and don't let them come home with me. I am a lover of batiks. They are very tightly woven and almost never fray. Most other cottons I have fray to a certain degree and I just deal with it by handling the fabric as little as possible and using the 2.0 seam stitch. I do not pre wash. I did that one time on one piece of fabric and I lost so much fabric due to raveling and like to have never gotten the wrinkles out of the fabric. Never again.

    Edited to add: If I see too much raveling I will backstitch every seam so that it doesn't shred on the edges.
    Last edited by Barb in Louisiana; 07-08-2018 at 06:21 PM.
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