Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 37

Thread: Help - I got the wrong kind of Heat n Bond

  1. #1
    KellyS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    78
    I'm making a tshirt quilt for my son and had been doing fine with the lighter weight product. Saw the heavier weight was less expensive per yard so got that - now I have no idea how to remove it from the back of the shirts I used it on. Only later - too late - did I read don't sew by machine. Have been trying to hand sew it but am about to give up and start all over. Any ideas?

  2. #2
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    MS
    Posts
    3,486
    Blog Entries
    2
    Yes, give up and start over.
    :-) Just teasing you. :-)
    I don't have a clue. I have and probably never will do a t-shirt anything. I am really sorry this has happened. Hope you get some tips and tricks.

  3. #3
    np3
    np3 is offline
    Power Poster np3's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Bakersfield, CA
    Posts
    14,032
    Blog Entries
    7
    I don't know if you can. Maybe someone will have an idea of what to do.

  4. #4
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Outer Space
    Posts
    9,839
    I don't think you can remove it. Maybe take some fabric paint and run a bead along the edges and decorate some how?

  5. #5
    Moderator sharon b's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Northern Indiana
    Posts
    20,411
    Blog Entries
    10
    Have you tried to reheat it and try peeling it off ?

  6. #6
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Out searching for some sunshine :-)
    Posts
    59,092
    Blog Entries
    1
    Well... the good news is once you iron it down? It should remain glued down forever. Sewing it won't be necessary.

    The bad news is, if you try and hand or machine sew through it to quilt, it will probably gunk up your needle. :(

  7. #7
    Moderator littlehud's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    SW Iowa
    Posts
    32,958
    I did this on my T shirt quilt I made for DD. I did finally get it quilted but my name for it is the Quilt from H***

  8. #8
    Super Member Dawn Hendrix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Wilson, NC
    Posts
    1,661
    I will tell you after I ALSO made this mistake using this product.... it does... after 3 years of sitting and being called UGLY names... get easier to sew through....

  9. #9
    KellyS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    78
    Thanks to everyone for your tips and info - really appreciate it - think I'll use a double leather thimble and a plastic canvas needle, it won't be pretty but it will be done!!! Thankfully it's only on a few of the shirts so the majority of it will be ok....hopefully!

  10. #10
    Super Member leiladylei54's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawaii
    Posts
    1,986
    I've used the non-sewable Heat and Bond and then tried to stitch it with my machine. It really gunks up the needle so the only thing you can do is deal with it and keep cleaning your needle every so often (very often). I haven't tried any other way to deal with trying to remove it once you have already bonded it on. I used a zigzag stitch on my banner using it and it seemed like every foot or so, I had to stop and clean the needle. I found that I didn't need to remove the needle on the machine but just take out the the thread and then with another needle, poke the hole of the sewing needle to clear away the gunk. But it was a real pain to do this throughout the whole banner. Now I know better to buy "light" sewable Heat and Bond. Lesson learned.

  11. #11
    KellyS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    78
    That might work, better than poking holes in my fingers! btw have some extra of the heavy duty stuff if anyone wants it, have resisted the urge to burn it in my driveway...haha

  12. #12
    Super Member quilting cat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Lake Stevens, WA
    Posts
    1,897
    The heavy duty is what you use for unsewn iron-on, also called "raw edge applique". I have had designs on sweatshirts last several years of washings without much fraying. I have also zigzagged over the edge of a picture, one side of stitch in the unbonded fabric, and found that greatly reduced the frequency of needle cleaning.

  13. #13
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    193
    You can machine sew with it on the back but have a cotton ball with kitchen grade oil (veg/soy/canola )and wipe your needle every so often to get the glue off of it.

  14. #14
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Posts
    11,196
    Blog Entries
    1
    i found if i have a gauze pad with baby oil, or sewing machine oil on it this can be used to wipe the *gunk* from the needle that builds up while sewing...it is hard to stitch through but lots easier with the machine than with a hand needle. it also stays pretty stiff in the finished project, but it's not the end of the world. the t-s will really hold up now with the heavy interfacing :)
    it makes it a little more difficult to complete, but is still totally do-able.

  15. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    512
    I have made two tee shirt quilts, one was patch work, the other machine appliqued. Used the thin interfacing on the patchwork top and heavier on the appliqued one. This one had all different sizes of emblems to use so I couldn't make a uniform patch. Ironed them onto a background and did the blind stitch around the edges in matching thread. I think acetone, fingernail polish on a piece of an old sock or a cotton ball would take the sticky stuff off your needle. Have some spares on hand and clean them up after you get several gunky. The heavier backing willonly make the quilt stiffer and it too willsoften up with use. I wouldn't even try to remove it, just go for it and get it done. Carol J.

    Carol J.

  16. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    512
    Should have said, fingernail polish remover in the above message, sorry about that.

    Carol J.

  17. #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Spanish Fort, AL
    Posts
    501
    I have a few friends that make lots of t-shirt quilts and I've made a couple myself. I really don't think you should be using heat and bond. You should probably using a really light weight iron-on interfacing that you would use when sewing garments. The idea is just to keep the t-shirt from stretching. Buy a small piece of interfacing and try it on some of the t-shirt scraps; I think you'll find that it's much softer in the quilts and MUCH easier to quilt.

  18. #18
    KellyS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    78
    Thanks again ladies for all the wonderful suggestions - may try one more time to sew it by machine with lots of gunk remover close by - if not will just do by hand.

  19. #19
    Super Member patdesign's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    So. Fla now, Va orig
    Posts
    1,567
    Quote Originally Posted by KellyS
    I'm making a tshirt quilt for my son and had been doing fine with the lighter weight product. Saw the heavier weight was less expensive per yard so got that - now I have no idea how to remove it from the back of the shirts I used it on. Only later - too late - did I read don't sew by machine. Have been trying to hand sew it but am about to give up and start all over. Any ideas?
    Contact the mfgr and ask if it can be removed with something, otherwise you may have to scrap the project. Definitely don't try stitching if the instructions say not to. I stitched thru some adhesive backed trim and spent hours cleaning the adhesive off the needle, bobbin case and internal parts.

  20. #20
    KellyS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    78
    There is a product called Un-Du that can be used - but can't find it anywhere local - may have to look online and pay for shipping?

  21. #21

    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    3
    Try sewing with a jean needle....you will still probably have to clean the needle often, but the jean needle may prove a little easier to sew with....

  22. #22
    Junior Member nantucketsue's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    West Yorkshire ,England
    Posts
    228
    Blog Entries
    1
    Would you be able to put it in really hot wash? I think I read that it is washable at 40 degrees, so if it is hotter maybe it will peel off.

  23. #23
    KellyS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    78
    AWESOME NEWS - went to my local Joann store and they have Duck brand Adhesive Remover it is working so now have several shirts that I have to use this stuff on - you just blot it on let it sit 20-30 secs and then scrape it off - scraper is on top of the bottle. The bad news is that my 50% off coupon expired yesterday... off to scraping...

  24. #24
    rosalyne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    160
    You now have a hanging wall quilt for your son's room so go ahead and start a new quilt You might be able to hand wash and then dry it flat so you can finish sewing it to hang on the wall. If we can sew leather on our machines we can certainly sew thru that. Roz

  25. #25
    Senior Member star619's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Shreveport, LA
    Posts
    855
    Blog Entries
    7
    Have you tried ironing or blowdrying with a with a hot blowdryer & pulling it up as you go? Sometimes that has worked for me. star619

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.