Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 34

Thread: HELP! I tried ironing waxed paper to fabric so I could print. Paper won't iron on! what went wrong?

  1. #1
    ButtercreamCakeArtist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    West Virginia
    Posts
    2,282
    OK! I have been wanting to try the method where you iron waxed paper to fabric, then print on the fabric....well, I can't get the paper to iron onto the fabric. I tried both sides of the waxed paper. I ironed and ironed for a while. The fabric is a stiff-like, muslin(SP?)-like cotton.
    Help! :cry: Thanks!

  2. #2
    Super Member Yvonne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Camarillo, California
    Posts
    1,747
    Miranda,
    Use freezer paper instead. Wax paper won't stick as you've found out. Iron the shiny side of the freezer paper to the cloth. Dull side toward the iron.

    Have fun now!
    :D

  3. #3
    ButtercreamCakeArtist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    West Virginia
    Posts
    2,282
    :oops: Yep, I found that mistake! Thanks for the reply!!!!!!!!!!! I think I'm out of freezer paper, and I wanted to do this so bad TODAY! :roll:
    I am such a goof ball!

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    47
    Miranda, you are not a goofball. I was going to do the same process and managed to bring home about 3 rolls of waxed paper. Each time I would get home and look at my instructions and think well shoot I bought the wrong stuff. Go right back and buy the same thing again!! LOL
    Gay

  5. #5
    Super Member Yvonne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Camarillo, California
    Posts
    1,747
    Nothing ventured, nothing gained! It was worth a try. Who knew? It might have worked. I know what you mean about wanting to do it right now!!! It boils down to "How bad do I want to do it? Am I willing to go to the store?" Often my answer is a resounding "NO!"

    I think you're mighty brave to be running fabric through the printer. I know many have done it (my sister included) but I'm chicken!

    Have fun when you do get your freezer paper.

    (Wax paper is good for melting pieces of crayone between! First grade teacher talking now!)

  6. #6
    ButtercreamCakeArtist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    West Virginia
    Posts
    2,282
    Quote Originally Posted by GayKennedy
    Miranda, you are not a goofball. I was going to do the same process and managed to bring home about 3 rolls of waxed paper. Each time I would get home and look at my instructions and think well shoot I bought the wrong stuff. Go right back and buy the same thing again!! LOL
    Gay
    LOL!!! That sounds like something I would do, too! I just hope I didn't get wax on my iron. It doesn't "look" like it, but...I think I'll run it over a dryer sheet to clean it, I heard that works for cleaning an iron.

  7. #7
    ButtercreamCakeArtist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    West Virginia
    Posts
    2,282
    Quote Originally Posted by Yvonne
    Nothing ventured, nothing gained! It was worth a try. Who knew? It might have worked. I know what you mean about wanting to do it right now!!! It boils down to "How bad do I want to do it? Am I willing to go to the store?" Often my answer is a resounding "NO!"

    I think you're mighty brave to be running fabric through the printer. I know many have done it (my sister included) but I'm chicken!

    Have fun when you do get your freezer paper.

    (Wax paper is good for melting pieces of crayone between! First grade teacher talking now!)
    How bad I want to make something when I don't have the materials is usually where I have to get really creative. I live 8 miles from a 2-lane road! (no, we're not on a dirt road-LOL!) Then, the store is about 10 miles from there...that's Kroger. Wal-Mart is a different story. It takes about 45 minutes to get there and about 40 miles one-way. The roads are curvy around here!
    To get to a craft store such as AC Moore or Michael's...well, we're talking about a 1.5 hour drive.

    I've yet to try the POF. Maybe soon.

    The crayon/wax paper idea is fun. I remember doing that when I was a kid. I think we gathered some fall leaves and put in there, too.

  8. #8
    Norah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    659
    Wax paper ain't what it used to be. It used to actually have visible wax on it. My mom used it to roll out her tender pie dough and it absorbs water so bad, you have to pick the pieces off the crust. :shock: It used to be tough stuff. Freezer paper is the way to go now.

  9. #9
    Super Member mimisharon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Jacksonville, North Carolina
    Posts
    6,014
    Morning Miranda,
    Where are you from in WV? I grew up around Parkersburg a few ( :) ) years ago.

    Sharon

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    398
    wax paper is supposed to clean an iron! :idea: :)

  11. #11
    ButtercreamCakeArtist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    West Virginia
    Posts
    2,282
    susan :lol: That is awesome. Now I have a clean iron and didn't even know it! :D

  12. #12

    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    398
    Yea I love that Iron on seem tape for quick hems and such but it does melt onto the iron if you accidently touch it, Aluminum foil is another quick fix. Iron it on hot to remove any goo or mineral build up from a steam iron esp.

  13. #13
    ButtercreamCakeArtist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    West Virginia
    Posts
    2,282
    hey! guess what?!?!
    I got that fabric out I tried ironing the wax paper to :roll: , ANYWAY, the fabric is a lot stiffer! I didn't really notice it the day I ironed it. This may be a good idea if you need to make your fabric a little stiffer to use it and don't need the fabric as stiff as you would with a stableizer.

    Well, I just wanted to share that with you. maybe it will help someone out!? :?:

    :shock: BTW, I did manage to finally get some freezer paper! LOL!

  14. #14
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    7,657
    Blog Entries
    3
    hmmmm ... very interesting. could be one of those discoveries that gets you into heaven.
    :wink:
    have you tested yet to see if it washes out in cold water?

  15. #15
    Moderator kathy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    on the Texas Coast
    Posts
    4,050
    I think it's the wax from the paper that made it stiff and it aint coming out easily. I don't think it will take a very good print either, because the ink is going to sit on top of the wax and not bond with the fibers.

  16. #16
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    7,657
    Blog Entries
    3
    i agree that trying to print on it would be a waste of time. but if there's a way to wash it out easily, i like the idea of using it as a stiffener.

    i suspect the only way to get it out is to boil it out, as in batik dying. but i live in hope ... LOL

    hmmmm ... i wonder ... if you didn't wash it out at all, would it make it more dust and stain resistant? could be a great thing for quilts meant to hang on walls.

  17. #17
    Moderator kathy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    on the Texas Coast
    Posts
    4,050
    you may be on to something..............quick, call the patent office

  18. #18
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    7,657
    Blog Entries
    3
    with my luck, somebody else already has. LOL

  19. #19
    Super Member vicki reno's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    2,427
    But on the other hand, if you weren't printing on that fabric but needd extra body for appliquing, how would that work?

  20. #20
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    7,657
    Blog Entries
    3
    the same 2 questions remain:

    (1) do need it to wash out for softness when the project is finished?
    (2) if you do, can you get it out without wrecking the quilt with boiling hot water?

    i'll test within the next few days and let you know. (one of these days i have GOT to get a life! i'm always fiddling around testing one thing or another. starting to feel like a lab rat. LOL)

    and if you leave the wax in, can you polish the quilt so it shines like a car?

    ok. i'm clearly losing what little is left of my mind. LOL :shock:

  21. #21
    Super Member Yvonne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Camarillo, California
    Posts
    1,747
    Patrice,
    You're our lab guru! You're no lab rat!!! :lol:

    Have fun now!

  22. #22
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    7,657
    Blog Entries
    3
    The Guru is stumped.

    I cranked my iron up to the highest setting. I ironed with the fabric on top. I ironed with the fabric on bottom. I ironed with the fabric sandwiched between two pieces of waxed paper. I seriously considered ironing while facing west while standing on only one leg while the dog sang to the cat. (The cat wouldn't cooperate, the stubborn, stuck-up cuss.)

    The parts of the paper that got hit with the heat do feel ever so slightly less waxy than the rest, but I can't see or feel any trace of wax on the fabric. It didn't even make my iron plate shiny.

    I used Cut-Rite. I wonder what ButtercreamCakeArtist used ...

    enquiring minds want to know ...

  23. #23
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    7,657
    Blog Entries
    3
    The Guru is stumped.

    I cranked my iron up to the highest setting. I ironed with the fabric on top. I ironed with the fabric on bottom. I ironed with the fabric sandwiched between two pieces of waxed paper. I seriously considered ironing while facing west while standing on only one leg while the dog sang to the cat. (The cat wouldn't cooperate, the stubborn, stuck-up cuss.)

    The parts of the paper that got hit with the heat do feel ever so slightly less waxy than the rest, but I can't see or feel any trace of wax on the fabric. It didn't even make my iron plate shiny.

    I used Cut-Rite. I wonder what ButtercreamCakeArtist used ...

    enquiring minds want to know ...

  24. #24
    ButtercreamCakeArtist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    West Virginia
    Posts
    2,282
    ButtercreamCakeArtist used Cut Rite. I kept turning the paper over and over and over and ironing and ironing. I did that with about 3 pieces. :lol: I was trying to make it stick to the fabric! I feel like an :oops: :oops: idiot. Oh, well. I've been sick, and my head is just not right!

    I got the freezer paper, but I haven't tried it yet, either. I wanted to get some of the Bubble Jet Set before I do. I'm afraid it would just be a waste of ink.

    I'm glad I got all your minds ticking, too! :D

  25. #25
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    7,657
    Blog Entries
    3
    i don't know why you feel like an idiot. it isn't as though somebody gave you the proper instructions then you ignored them. you were brave enough to experiment, then SMART enough to ask when you didn't get the result you hoped for. you should see the results of some of the things i've tried over the years. LOL

    i can't speak for anybody else but the only things I've known how to do from birth are eat, sleep, process and expel the results of eating, and cry. the rest has been learned over time.

    go to Dharma.com for your BJS. while you're there, get a bottle of either Retayne or Dharma Dye Fixative (same chemical, different brands.) also make sure you print on 200-ct 100% cotton muslin or 100% silk. if you're printing with an HP using color ink cartridge #10, 11, or 97, expect to lose a lot of ink in the first rinse (20% fade or more). don't blame yourself - it's the "new" and "improved" ink that causes the problem. don't spend all that extra money on bubble jet rinse. synthrapol (your least expensive solution - you only need 4 caps full in a full washer load. also get mine from Dharma.), woolite, or any super-mild detergent will do.

    after the first rinse, soak your printed sheets for 30 minutes in a solution of around 1/8 cup of the liquid dye fixative for each 2 cups of water. there's nothing about that in the instructions but think about it ... dye base inks ... dye fixative. i do it as an inexpensive extra step for added insurance against fading over time.

    i used to be able to feed fabric through my HP printers easily when ironed to freezer paper. the newer models don't handle it as well. some people swear by full-page labels. i like the sticker project paper (by Avery) better. it's easier for me to get the fabric off without stretching it all out of shape.

    if you are lucky enough to have a Canon printer that uses cartridges with numbers starting with CL, you can skip the first detergent wash and drop them straight into the dye fixative mix. you will lose so little ink you can hardly see the difference.

    end of chapter. in the next installment, dear readers, we'll find out whether it was the butler or the maid ...

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.