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Thread: Home quilting machine and frame

  1. #1
    paintedquilt's Avatar
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    Does anyone have a home quilting machine ie Janome 1600 and a frame. Is so are you happy with it? When you are doing a queen size quilt and you're near the end how much length can you quilt?

  2. #2
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    I would suggest joining the homequiltingsystem list at http://groups.yahoo.com and browsing through their files and posts for information. In general, using a domestic machine with a frame limits available quilting space to just a few inches after a quilt is rolled up.

  3. #3
    Super Member mar32428's Avatar
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    I have both a full size Grace quilting machine and the Janome 1600. I've had good luck with both. I haven't gotten to a full size quilt yet cause I'm still practicing with lap robes etc.

    Yes, you do not have the same space to quilt on as a deep throat long arm machine but you also don't have to pay the high price.

    It takes me a little longer to quilt and I have to figure out my patterns but I love the setup. I tried hand quilting and that's not for me. Also tried quilting on my machine with no frame. That was hard work and no fun wrestling a king size quilt under the throat or over my shoulder. I even tried Flynn's quilter and tho that was better, it still wasn't the answer. I'm in no special hurry and one thing I have at my age is time.

  4. #4
    Power Poster MadQuilter's Avatar
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    I just found out that the Gandquilter machine is like the Janome 1600. I have it with a HandiQuilter frame. Notice I said with, not on. I'm still waiting to refine the setup. To that I want the handi handles (which are out of production, but it looks like I found some) and the quilter's cruise control (which is still in the box).

    The frame is set up on a 4'x8' folding table. I actually never measured how wide I can quilt on it. Normally, I don't go to the larger sizes.

    Like everything else - it takes practice which takes time which I don't have.

  5. #5
    Super Member jljack's Avatar
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    I have a Baby Lock Quilters Pro machine on a New Joy frame, which is probably about what you are looking at. I have no problems with the amount of quilting space usually, but when doing larger quilts I do have to be careful so I get the whole pattern on the available space -- which is around 5" wide, with about 4" really useable space. I like using pantograph patterns, because then you get even pattern overall, or I do my own style of meandering swirly pattern that is OK with varying size loops and swirls. My frame sits on the floor with the machine on a little platform that moves in all directions.

  6. #6
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    For a little more money, you could get a Bailey -- it's a mid-arm machine, with a throat space of 13" or 15". I have a 15", and it gives me a LOT more pattern/quilting space. You can sometimes find a used one for a really good price -- I got mine for only $1300 and that included the stitch regulator (normally over $600 on its own).

    Just something else to keep in mind -- I started with a 9" Juki, and I was very unhappy with the small stitching space. But there are a lot of people that are able to make it work.

  7. #7
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    I have the Bailey 15" on a Grace Pinnacle, which is set at 8' not the full 10', and it seems to be just right. It is now available in a 17" model as well. I also have the Babylock Quilter's Choice Pro, an amazing machine I use now exclusively for piecing and quilting small items, just, for me, it is to short a throat for me to quilt anything large. Now this may just be a personal issue, I know many others have quilted king size quilts on this little workhorse.

  8. #8
    Super Member weezie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mar32428
    I have both a full size Grace quilting machine and the Janome 1600. I've had good luck with both. I haven't gotten to a full size quilt yet cause I'm still practicing with lap robes etc.

    Yes, you do not have the same space to quilt on as a deep throat long arm machine but you also don't have to pay the high price.

    It takes me a little longer to quilt and I have to figure out my patterns but I love the setup. I tried hand quilting and that's not for me. Also tried quilting on my machine with no frame. That was hard work and no fun wrestling a king size quilt under the throat or over my shoulder. I even tried Flynn's quilter and tho that was better, it still wasn't the answer. I'm in no special hurry and one thing I have at my age is time.
    Me, too! (Grace Next Generation frame and 1600 DBX) I've got so many fingers in so many pies, though, that I've had very little time to practice with it. My theory both now and when I bought the frame and machine is that it's gotta be worlds better than trying to quilt a large quilt on any of my other machines (for a variety of reasons that I won't bore you with). I do some hand quilting because I like to do it, but I'm slow at it ... tortoise slow; molasses-in-winter slow. I wouldn't even consider the expense of a long-arm ... for me, it would be a frivolous purchase ... with no way I could justify it, as much as I'd love to have one.

  9. #9
    Super Member mar32428's Avatar
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    I started with meandering stitches too so I could get the feel of how the machine works. My machine sits on a carrier that moves in any direction. I also have the styles that follows a guilt pattern but have only just tried it. I think the best for me will be the pouncer with the chalk. I did find that my years of doing free motion decorative stitching has been a big help. I'm not afraid to move the machine. Also I don't have any quilt police around so if I make a mistake, who knows but me and the cats.

  10. #10
    Senior Member hulahoop1's Avatar
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    I purchased plans for a machine quilting frame (http://www.buildaquiltingframe.com/) and my husband built it for me a year ago. My only regret is that we built it only 8 feet long, so I cannot do anything larger than about 90 inches wide. Initially, I used my Bernina Aurora 430 with the BSR on the frame, but the throat space was too small (or my quilts were too big). For my birthday last spring, I got the Janome 1600p and put it on the frame. The Janome has more throat space. I put a speed regulator on it so I don't have to use the foot pedal. I haven't put on a stitch regulator, and don't plan to. We put handlebars on the back of the sewing machine so I can use pantographs. Our next step, I think is to rig handlebars on the front so I can learn to do more free motion. It has been a terrific setup so far and I have learned bunches and bunches.

  11. #11
    Super Member jljack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maribeth
    I also have the Babylock Quilter's Choice Pro, an amazing machine I use now exclusively for piecing and quilting small items, just, for me, it is to short a throat for me to quilt anything large. Now this may just be a personal issue, I know many others have quilted king size quilts on this little workhorse.
    If I had my choice (i.e. could afford it!!), I would use the Babylock just for piecing, and would get a mid-arm 17". My friend got a Tin Lizzie last year and loves it!!!

  12. #12
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    If I had my choice (i.e. could afford it!!), I would use the Babylock just for piecing, and would get a mid-arm 17". My friend got a Tin Lizzie last year and loves it!!!
    You and me both!!! Some day my ship will come in...Or I will win the lottery.... :D:D:D

  13. #13
    Super Member brushandthimble's Avatar
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    I started with the B-Line studio frame and Brother 1500, now the machine is for sale with the Hinterberg stand up frame. I upgraded 2 years ago to Handiquilter 16 on the B-Line. The HQ frame is still in the box.
    I LOVE my HQ.

  14. #14
    Senior Member kat112000's Avatar
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    I have the Megaquilter by Husqvarna on a Grace Pinnacle frame. I have been enjoying making many different size quilts, but the shorter throat is challenging. I have only had the machine since August and would love to move up to a Tin Lizzie with a deeper throat.

  15. #15
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    Hi,

    I put together the small version viking megaquilter with the gracie next generation frame.

    The viking is about the same as the janome 1600, just different plastic on the front, I think made by the same company.

    The next generation frame is 4 rails, 120" (ten feet) long.

    I made leaders to total 115 inches. That should hold a queen size quilt.

    Your question about length is to turn the long side of your quilt left to right so you don't put so many layers of rolled quilt into the machine throat.

    I can comfortably quilt up to 105 inches left to right, because the bunjee cord tension clamps on the right and left sides of my quilt back bump into the machine carriage when I get to within 3-5 inches of the edge.

    If I have to sneak another inch or two, I unclamp the edge when I get really close and drive with one hand while steadying the quilt edge with the other.

    Not the best, but cheaper than the alternative.

    So far, I really like my machine frame and machine.

    Keep shopping and comparing features!

    Give me a shout if you think I might be of any help.

  16. #16
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    I do! the machine and frame are OK but the 5 in designs are some times a problem the bigger designs wont work that limits your creativity. you need to have fun quilting limits are not fun i would love to have a deep throat machine.i also would like the PC quilter looking for a used one no luck cant even fined a dealer in mo even if the jaomie is a good machine i rally want deeper throat machine

  17. #17
    Senior Member Lucky Lindy's Avatar
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    I have a Janome 1600, and a Grace frame. I think it works great for small quilts, I don't think I would try a queen size. There just wouldn't be enough room on the throat by the time you got to the end. Besides, I'd much rather send it out and have someone else wrestle with a big quilt.

  18. #18
    Shelley Ann's Avatar
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    I am considering a new Husqvarna Saphire 830 machine with a 10" throat. I have a new homemade frame and can't quilt a Baptist Fan design I just marked my latest king sized quilt top with because it's too large for my 6 7/8" Pfaff. The Saphire is only $899, but I don't want to throw money away if it's not going to do the job. Is anyone happy quilting with a 9" or 10" machine on a rolling frame, or is it still too small and frustrating?

  19. #19
    Senior Member kat112000's Avatar
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    My mega quilter is only 9" and it is a pain for bigger quilts. I am seriously looking into a babylock or something similar.

  20. #20
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    i don't do queen or king very often so it pays for me to rent studio time on a long arm instead of struggling with it on my sewing machine setup.

    it costs $20 an hour on a HQ16 and they have all the bells and whistles and i didn't have to lay out the cash for it.

  21. #21
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    I purchased the Gracie quilting frame and the Janome 1600. I am unhappy with the 9" throat because I cannot quilt a whole block and have to roll it up to finish. I regret not getting the Bailey with the 13" throat. This would have enabled me to do an entire 10" block at a time. It's worth a little extra money to get the Bailey. I wish I had. I've heard good things about the Bailey.

  22. #22
    Shelley Ann's Avatar
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    Thank you for the Bailey idea! I have been searching for quite some time for something that is reasonably priced and never came across that. Do you know someone who has one? How did you come across it?

  23. #23
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    I own a Bailey! (and I think I posted in this thread about it already, LOL) It's a 15", and I love it. As I mentioned in my earlier post in this thread, I started with a 9" Juki, and ended up hating it -- you just can't do very complex patterns, especially as you get towards the end of the quilt. I learned about the Bailey on Yahoo Groups:

    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/homequiltingsystems/ (devoted to general home quilting setups)
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Baileyquiltingmachines/ (just for Baileys)

    I've only done one quilt on it so far, but it turned out really well, considering I'm a complete and total newbie to quilting in general. With the 15" throat, I would easily be able to do 8" - 10" patterns. I did a pantograph pattern on my first quilt, because I find the idea of free motion quilting intimidating, and I like having a set pattern to follow. I practiced the same pattern over and over for a few hours before starting, and then did the quilting itself probably in about 5 hours.

    Pros: large throat that allows for larger patterns, very reasonable price for what you get. Relatively easy to use once you get the hang of it (I had some issues initially, but I've got everything straightened out now). Great customer service from Mr. Bailey himself.

    Cons: not a lot of bells and whistles like you would get with a true long arm. Things are a little jerry-rigged together, although they are functional. Extra cost: the stitch regulator -- some people can function fine without it, but I personally could never do quilting without it.

    I bought mine used for a very reasonable price that included the stitch regulator. If you post on the Bailey Yahoo Group in the Database->For Sale or Wanted section that you are looking for one, then people who are selling will contact you (doesn't hurt to do the same in the Home Quilting Systems group, either). There's also a couple of complete systems available for sale in the database as well, but if you're not looking for a frame, that won't be much help to you.

    I'm happy to answer any questions about owning a Bailey -- I'm no expert, of course, but I'm getting the hang of using it now, and am really happy with it.

  24. #24
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    [quote=hulahoop1]I purchased plans for a machine quilting frame (http://www.buildaquiltingframe.com/) and my husband built it for me a year ago. My only regret is that we built it only 8 feet long, so I cannot do anything larger than about 90 inches wide.

    Hulahoop,

    How long would you build it. I too have purchased the plans, and my dh is going to make one for me. Also, what kind of handlebars did you use. I want him to make this as inexpensively as he can, as money is tight.

  25. #25
    Senior Member hulahoop1's Avatar
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    [quote=hsquiltingmom]
    Quote Originally Posted by hulahoop1
    I purchased plans for a machine quilting frame (http://www.buildaquiltingframe.com/) and my husband built it for me a year ago. My only regret is that we built it only 8 feet long, so I cannot do anything larger than about 90 inches wide.

    Hulahoop,

    How long would you build it. I too have purchased the plans, and my dh is going to make one for me. Also, what kind of handlebars did you use. I want him to make this as inexpensively as he can, as money is tight.
    If you've got the room, make it at least 10 feet long. The plans have it made out of 2x4 pine. My husband made mine out of mahogany because he wanted to, I guess. The handlebars are made out of 1-inch pvc sprinkler pipe and they work great!

    I've got a section on my blog that has more info in detail. Go to: http://hulahoop1.blogspot.com/

    Let me know if I can be of further help. Have fun.

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