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Thread: Household items turned quilting notions?

  1. #151
    Junior Member jean knapp's Avatar
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    insead of buying an expensive tool to roll over seams instead of the iron I use the old roller from wall papering days. Its only about 1 1/2 " it was used to roll the seams of wallpaper. Before I found it I used an old caster. Jean

  2. #152
    Super Member Nanjun's Avatar
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    I covered a large coffee can with a wide wall paper border
    to colect my strings and sall scraps . Empty it about once a week.

  3. #153
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    You know when you have a doctors visit and you lay on that table with the paper on. Well that paper is great for paper piecing. They know when my visit is over they rip the paper off and give it to me. Try it, it is great to use.

  4. #154
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    When making a pineapple design, tiny paper pieced item, I use my small wall paper roller, about 1-2 inch size to press the material fold down so you don't have to keep running to the iron.

  5. #155
    tall2's Avatar
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    My sister actually came up with this hint ,but I do use it alot. When making postcards "the embrodery kind" Or " Lables for your Quilts". I cut freezer paper the size of a sheet of paper (8 1/2 x 11), press some thin muslin to it wait for it to cool, then run it thru the printer.. My printer is a ink jet, I have not tried it on any other printer types yet. I use several programs that will type in diffrent styles, makes making them more fun. Also, the sheets usually only work on 2 rounds thru the printer, most of the wax on the paper is gone then.--recycle to make patterns. Oh, and if your printer works with EQ- you can make the design on several copies then sew together...
    barbara

  6. #156
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    Cookie cutters for applique patterns, tic tac box for used and broken needles, pins,

  7. #157
    Super Member featherweight's Avatar
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    Now we are getting a bunch of duplicates.. I guess everyone doesn't read the entire thread before entering their favorite things.

  8. #158
    Super Member jbj137's Avatar
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    All good idas!!!

  9. #159
    Super Member Ripped on Scotch's Avatar
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    Dryer sheets to clean my iron.... I wait till I'm finished for the night and unplug the iron then iron a dryer sheet. it gets all the goo off the iron from steam a seam and things tha tmake it sticky.... plus my husband likes the smell of it.

  10. #160
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bobbin along
    Quote Originally Posted by jprusky
    Would you mind sharing with me your recipe for spray starch using corn starch? If it's an "old family secret" just say so and I'll understand. Thanks. Judy
    I looked it up---I heaping Tpsp corn starch in a pint of cold water. put it in a spray bottle. always shake before using. Add 2 dropps of essential oil if you'd like a nice scent. :lol:
    Thanks for looking it up and posting it. I looks pretty simple.

  11. #161
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    I have an old typewriter table next to my sewing machine for ironing or whatever. I bought it for $10.00 on Craig's list.

  12. #162
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    Quote Originally Posted by tall2
    My sister actually came up with this hint ,but I do use it alot. When making postcards "the embrodery kind" Or " Lables for your Quilts". I cut freezer paper the size of a sheet of paper (8 1/2 x 11), press some thin muslin to it wait for it to cool, then run it thru the printer.. My printer is a ink jet, I have not tried it on any other printer types yet. I use several programs that will type in diffrent styles, makes making them more fun. Also, the sheets usually only work on 2 rounds thru the printer, most of the wax on the paper is gone then.--recycle to make patterns. Oh, and if your printer works with EQ- you can make the design on several copies then sew together...
    barbara
    When I did this, the ink washed off.

  13. #163
    Senior Member neeng's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by neonparrot
    I love my tall 4-drawer metal file cabinet. Painted it to match my sewing room & so organized for patterns, books, class lessons, ideas, print-outs, etc. Labeled the drawers and I use hanging files, plus regular file folders.

    Use deli-papers that I get at Sam's, papers that are used for sandwich wraps. They are thin & about 11x12 inches. Paper clip 5-6 of these sheets together well, with a magic marker pattern you want to use for quilting, underneath all of them. With no thread in your machine, follow the pattern and "sew" these sheets following the lines. Then you have your designs on lots of sheets, and you just place one sheet on top of your quilt and machine sew the quilting design on your fabric. Tear off & throw away. Works great.

    I love my bobbin keepers because I thread loads of bobbins ahead of time, for quilting, machine embroidery, lace making, heirloom sewing & regular sewing. With about an 6" square of styrofoam, I have stuck short, thin wooden skewers in it, and slide on each skewer my filled bobbins, by color and design. With a magic marker I have drawn a line separating some of the skewers, so I know which section of bobbins is for regular sewing, embroidery thread, etc. I have a couple different ones for use with different machines. Holds lots of bobbins.
    Fantastic idea for both the paper quilting patterns and the bobbin holders...will definitely be using these! Thank you (and everyone else on this thread, it is sew helpful).

  14. #164
    Senior Member neeng's Avatar
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    Forgot one. I use canned air (find it at computer/electronics stores) to clean out my bobbin case and especially my serger. Blows out all the tiny stuff that the Q-tips and paintbrushes won't get.
    The one I have is called Dust-off and comes with a long "straw" that lets you get into the tiniest places.

  15. #165
    NanSew's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Quilting Nana
    I use a long magnetic strip my DH got at HD. I think it is used for screw drivers but I use it for my all my sissers It works great.
    Ikia has these.

  16. #166
    Super Member BettyGee's Avatar
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    I use large, 5" high, prescription medicine containers for pens, scissors, hooks and just about anything that is prone to rolling off a table.

    Found a closet organizer at a yard sale for $10.00 that is six shelves high and it makes a perfect place to keep my fabrics. I can see exactly what I have on hand. Although there always seems to be that one fabric I just have to have. Bet many can relate to that.

    Bamboo skewers are perfect for shaping corners.

    The plastic containers that fruits come in are perfect for keeping pre-cut squares organized, the smaller ones are great for keeping small templates safe and together.

    Love this topic, will be watching for more ideas.

    BettyGee in Colorado

  17. #167

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kathy46
    Hi! Don't know if this has been mentioned, but I use a grapefruit spoon to close and open safety pins when I am sandwiching a quilt to be quilted. Works like a charm and less stress on the fingers.
    How exactly do you use the grapefruit spoon.

  18. #168
    Member myothsec's Avatar
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    I use a fabric magazine rack to store all my long tubes of paper like pantos, and rolls of fusible etc. Works great, and hides them all.
    I sanded, and painted a hollow core door and placed it on top of two 36" high bookshelves to make a 36" x 80" cutting table which is exactly the right height to work at. I LOVE IT!
    I purchased strong magnetic tool holders at the hardware store and use them to hold up quilts in progress or once they are finished. Magnets leave no holes!
    I also purchased a 6ft. shade on sale and have attached flannel to it to make it a disappearing design wall.
    I purchased heavy clear vinyl from my WalMart fabric dept, marked the grid on it myself and cut it to fit my Grace frame to align pantos on. $14.00 instead of $70 for pre-gridded vinyl you buy online.
    I purchase my safety pins for basting online from a dry-cleaners wholesale shop - MUCH CHEAPER!
    You can see my studio by going to my site at
    www.belvidere.net/quilt - lots of ideas for you there!

  19. #169
    Senior Member DoxieMom's Avatar
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    Great idea for using old needles. I hate having to make a large hole. I'm going to try this out!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by burnsk
    I use my old machine needles to hang pictures. They are steel so they're strong and they make such a small hole in the wall.

    I use the square kleenex boxes for a thread and scrap catcher. When it's full it's tossed.

  20. #170
    quiltilicious's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tall2
    My sister actually came up with this hint ,but I do use it alot. When making postcards "the embrodery kind" Or " Lables for your Quilts". I cut freezer paper the size of a sheet of paper (8 1/2 x 11), press some thin muslin to it wait for it to cool, then run it thru the printer.. My printer is a ink jet, I have not tried it on any other printer types yet. I use several programs that will type in diffrent styles, makes making them more fun. Also, the sheets usually only work on 2 rounds thru the printer, most of the wax on the paper is gone then.--recycle to make patterns. Oh, and if your printer works with EQ- you can make the design on several copies then sew together...
    barbara
    I've done this with regular fabric and my color laser printer. The laser printer supposedly heat-sets the ink into the fabric. I haven't tried washing any of it yet, but it works great! (I only use the freezer paper once through the printer, however)

  21. #171
    quiltilicious's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cindy Shaw
    Quote Originally Posted by tall2
    My sister actually came up with this hint ,but I do use it alot. When making postcards "the embrodery kind" Or " Lables for your Quilts". I cut freezer paper the size of a sheet of paper (8 1/2 x 11), press some thin muslin to it wait for it to cool, then run it thru the printer.. My printer is a ink jet, I have not tried it on any other printer types yet. I use several programs that will type in diffrent styles, makes making them more fun. Also, the sheets usually only work on 2 rounds thru the printer, most of the wax on the paper is gone then.--recycle to make patterns. Oh, and if your printer works with EQ- you can make the design on several copies then sew together...
    barbara
    When I did this, the ink washed off.
    did you heat-set the ink from the ink jet with an iron? I think you have to do that (I haven't tested this myself)

  22. #172
    Super Member Charleen DiSante's Avatar
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    Saw this idea a while ago and contacted the bird experts. They said to make sure the pieces are no longer than 3 or 4 inches for safety. Great ideas folks!
    Quote Originally Posted by Judiw
    Quote Originally Posted by MaryAlice
    My sewing room is in my basement, so when I needed a second pincushion, I went over to the the kids toy area and grabbed a Furby. Makes a great pin cushion,stands on the table and is small.(the kids are older, they don't mind)

    I discovered that my sewing machine with the expanded base fits perfectly on the keyboard shelf of an old corner computer desk I dont use anymore. Its like having a custom sewing table.

    I use a glass next to my machine to hold cut threads, and squares of batting to hold threads by the longarm. When they are covered, I chuck them. (can you tell I have a thread problem!!)
    I saw an idea for thread and small scraps for bird lovers. Put in a hanging basket and the birds take them for nests. I have been putting mine in a plastic bag hanging by the cutting table to remind me and will do that in the spring.

  23. #173
    Super Member scowlkat's Avatar
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    I bought one of the shoe organizers that hangs on the back of the door and use it to hold rolls of stabilizer and also bought a roll of the exam table paper on ebay and keep it in the organizer.

    I was fortunate to find a drafting table at a cheap price with rollers. I was able to find a cutting mat that was exactly twice as big as the table top so cut it in half and use large binder clips to keep the mat on the top of the table - and have the other half for when the first one wears out! Also can remove the mat and use the table in the tilted position when I am drafting a quilt pattern or using my light box. The best part is being able to wheel it right beside my sewing machine and then wheel it away when it's not needed.

  24. #174
    Member Helen20906's Avatar
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    Use little girl metal hair clips to hold layers together instead of straight pins when finishing my quilt and sewing on the binding.

  25. #175
    Junior Member poultney's Avatar
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    Great ideas! Love them all.

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