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Thread: How can I make shelves myself for my closet?

  1. #1
    Super Member jcrow's Avatar
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    How can I make shelves myself for my closet?

    I am in the process of cleaning out my closet (it is one whole wall) of all my "extra" clothes (which I will never use) and want to put up shelves in it for all my fabric. I see pics of really nice shelving, but I don't think I can afford that. I would like three rows tall of shelves. Any ideas? What kind of wood would I use? How would I make them? I'm not handy with a hammer so it would have to be easy but stable. And I would have to paint them so I don't want to spend too much money on expensive wood. I don't want plywood for sure. Any ideas?
    "Be yourself...everyone else is taken."
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  2. #2
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    You can use pine boards and paint them or buy laminated ones. The store can cut them the size you need, shelves and slats. I would use a wall anchor if not in a stud for the slats. You will need a drill and screw driver rather than a hammer....lol. A level is handy too. More expensive would be to use elfa shelves from container store. Their setup is really easy and wonderful when complete. Good luck.
    Linda

  3. #3
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
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    I bought a wire stand alone shelf unit , and had plexiglass cut for each shelf to cover the wire. I like it as its not afixed to the wall and I can remove it if I ever need to without and additional repair work. I also put the unit on casters so I can roll it out when any major reoraganization needs to happen. It was easy and the most painless.

  4. #4
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
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    Have you considered the wire/metal storage shelving units sold at Target and Walmart and Home Depot? Most have adjustable shelves so you can space them any way you want, they're very easy to put together with a screwdriver, they'd be cheaper in time and money than permanent wooden shelves, you could buy them one at a time to spread out the cost, they don't alter the value of your home, their non-acid surface is safer for fabric storage, they're movable, they fit in closets perfectly, and they come in lots of sizes so you can custom fit your space.
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  5. #5
    Super Member DebraK's Avatar
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    putting it on wheels is a great idea.

  6. #6
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    You don't won't permanent shelves, you can't change your mind later what you want the closet to hold. Get the self assembly utility shelves at Lowe's. They are great. No tools needed and they can be from 2 to 6 shelves high. there is even a corner unit.
    Got fabric?

  7. #7
    Super Member jcrow's Avatar
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    You are all right. I don't want anything permanent. I want shelving that you assemble. I guess I didn't think of that. And I think the adjustable shelves with wire storage would be perfect. If I can get all that on wheels, I'm set. Thanks for the ideas! I was thinking I had to actually build my own shelves. Whew! This is so much better and wiser!
    "Be yourself...everyone else is taken."
    Strong people don't put others down...they build them up."
    "Remember that your instincts are more important than rules"

  8. #8
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    Another simple shelving solution is to use plastic milk crates on their sides! They stack well to give you a wall of storage pretty easily, and lots of cubbies for different purposes. Added bonus, you can turn them the normal way and you have handy carrying bins.

    I'm sure you can can buy the same thing in your USA stores for minimal costs if you don't want the total salvage look!
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  9. #9
    Super Member luvTooQuilt's Avatar
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    Id hit thrift stores, garage and yard sales.. even craigslist for book shelves..

    All my furniture was second hand..My floor to ceiling (all wood) bookcase was only $35..Heavy booger but i love it.. Ive got each of other3 bookcases for less even..
    I did splurge on the 24/48 shoe cubbies from Lowes- they hold my fq and 1930's..
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    and I bought the sterilite drawers on rollers new, on sale a few at a time until i had plenty..
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    Last edited by luvTooQuilt; 05-10-2012 at 06:40 AM.

  10. #10
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    ​Depending on how wide the closet door is, one of the metal kitchen racks that you assemble might work for you.

  11. #11
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    Or you could look at industrial shelving.
    The stuff I use is from the Tennsco line.

    http://www.tennsco-shelving.com/

    It has changed over the years - the last units I purchased have white laminate boards for the shelving and I have the lighter duty units.

    The frames are pounded together with a rubber mallet/hammer. The shelves are adjustable in 1.5 inch increments (I think)

    It's sturdy - The bigger units go together better with two people doing it - one to hold the piece in place and the other to pound - but no nails, screws, etc. are needed. The only other thing necessary might be shims to get them level and floor or carpet protectors.

    Also - the shelves can be adjusted without dismantling the whole thing. And if you ever decided to move, they dismantle fairly easily. (My DH pounded the last ones together - and he wanted them to be SOLID - so it took me a bit of effort to get the shelf support loose - but I did do it) And there would probably be no problem in reselling them if you didn't care for them.

    The cost - I thought reasonable - at least compared to building it ourselves - it is utilitarian, but is available in several colors.

    The last time I looked, various widths and lengths of components were available. The vertical support posts can be cut to whatever length you need, but you would probably be charged for the nearest longer length that is 'standard'
    Last edited by bearisgray; 05-10-2012 at 07:32 AM.

  12. #12
    Super Member GrannieAnnie's Avatar
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    I put heavy plastic (resin maybe) shelves in my closet. Two 5 shelf units are just the perfect size for my former closet----------6' wide. The units I have are a decent depth. If I remember, I paid about $40 for each unit from Home Depot (maybe Lowes??)
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  13. #13
    Junior Member Christine George's Avatar
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    Glass blocks make great shelf supports. When they are on sale they're about $.99 each. Boards and blocks is all you need.

  14. #14
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    I have an armoire and put the clear vinyl on the shelves to protect the fabric from the wood.

  15. #15
    Power Poster joyce888's Avatar
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    I bought the wire shelving from Home Depot and installed it in my sewing room closet. It comes in 12" & 18" deep and it's installed with brackets. There are clips that support it along the back wall. My advice is to be sure you install enough brackets to support the fabric or it will cause the shelf to bow in the center.
    Joyce

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  16. #16
    Super Member raptureready's Avatar
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    I'd just buy a bookshelf from the Goodwill.
    If no one ever experimented we'd all still be making 4 patches.

  17. #17
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    You can even use small bookcases in your closet, look at yardsales, thriftstores, or any store. So what if they don't look pretty the fabric won't care

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