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Thread: How many quilt on reg sewing machine?

  1. #1
    Junior Member mimmy96's Avatar
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    How many quilt on reg sewing machine?

    How many do not have a Long arm machine and just use their reg sewing machine to quilts? Or do a lot that just have a reg machine .. Machine sew the top, but then get them quilted somewhere else? I am getting ready to get a new machine, it will not be a long arm.... I am brand new to quilting and I am just wondering how all this works. I realize larger quilts may not be able to be quilted on a reg sewing machine.. But maybe I am wrong!

  2. #2
    Super Member MaryMo's Avatar
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    I sew on a regular sewing machine, one I've had for 20 years that still works perfectly. I have not quilted a large quilt but have made several smaller projects - mug rugs, placements, dog quilts. I am practicing to machine quilt a lap-sized quilt. Up until now I have either tied those or done a combination of hand quilting and tying. I've read on here of some who have done a regular sized quilt (twin ?) on their regular sewing machine. I'm not that confident yet.
    Make it a scrappy happy day!

  3. #3
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    I quilted on my domestic machine before I got my midarm. My preference is definitely the midarm -- much faster for me, plus much easier for me to move the machine instead of the quilt.

    You can quilt large quilts on a domestic machine by splitting up the batting. Basically you layer the sandwich as usual, but then remove one-third of the batting from each side so there is less bulk under the arm. Marti Mitchell has an entire book out on different methods for quilting large quilts on domestic sewing machines. (Be sure to get more details on how to do the method I described before tackling it; there are a few steps to doing it so that the batting goes back together accurately.)

    A lot depends on finances. Beginning frame setups for quilting start around $2,000. This can be a good investment for someone who would otherwise be sending out a lot of quilts to a longarmer.

  4. #4
    Super Member quiltingfan's Avatar
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    I have quilted several queens on my domestic machine. I only do meander though and have not tried any fancy stuff.

  5. #5
    Super Member woody's Avatar
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    I quilted all my quilts on a regular little Brother sewing machine, (mostly lap or single bed size) took some squishing but definately doable. I have now got a Janome Horizon 7700 which has much more room, so it make it easier. I don't have a frame, if I need to do a large quilt, I put my sewing machine next to my dining table to help support the weight of the quilt. Well worth the time and effort to practice as I just couldn't afford to send my quilt to the longarmers.
    The biggest risk is the one not taken

  6. #6
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    I only quilt on my sewing machine. Right now i'm quilting a king size...not splitting the batting. Its a workout, but it can be done. Once you get past the center 18 inches, it becomes easier.

  7. #7
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    Ooops, one more thing. Just a preference, but i can't wrestle a quilt without using quilting gloves...or rubber tipped gardening gloves.

  8. #8
    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
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    Some quilters do wonders on regular machines and even quilt King size. Now I will do King, but in sections. my machine doesn't have a large throat space and that would really help.

  9. #9
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    I've quilted up to a twin on my Bernina 440 QE with my BSR. I am going to quilt my queen size Spiderweb quilt on it but I will do it in 2 sections and use batting tape for joining the 2 quilted halves.

  10. #10
    Super Member quilts4charity's Avatar
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    I quilt with a midarm on a frame now but did it for many years on my Juki and I never split the batting either...I worked from the middle out, been to some get togethers and still did it this way as you can't take the frame...LOL!!!!!

  11. #11
    Super Member Cybrarian's Avatar
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    Many quilt quilts as large as king size on their domestic sewing machine. There are many books, videos and classes online or face to face to help you learn if you desire to. I do my own quilting, although twin size is the largest I've done. I prefer to make bed runners rather than a queen or king size quilt. That's the beauty of quilting the best way is the way that works for you. HAPPY QUILTING!

  12. #12
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    I have quilted up to a King on my Bernina 150. That being said, if someone gave me a stationary mid-arm or long-arm, I wouldn't turn them away!
    Mark

  13. #13
    Super Member luvTooQuilt's Avatar
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    Kudos to all that can quilt their quilts on a reg machine !!!!

    I send mine out to a longarmer.. Me personally, I do not want to wrestle with a king or queen quilt... I think if i had to I would be turned off on quilting all together..

  14. #14
    Super Member DebraK's Avatar
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    I use both.
    I have chosen to be happy because it is good for my health - Voltaire

  15. #15
    Super Member TerryQuilter's Avatar
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    I quilt on my Janome 6600P, but twin size is about as large as I have done. I am looking into buying a Sweet 16 or Bailey sit down mid arm so I can do larger quilts and so I don't have to do all that scrunching of the quilt. By the time I'm finished with a larger than lap quilt, I have really had a good upper body work out **
    The Trike Riding Quilting Diva

  16. #16
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    I do free motion on my Bernina that is around 30 years old. I quilt from king size down. To quilt the larger quilts you have to "scrunch" and/or roll them to make room. A table or chair behind the machine to hold the bulk of the quilt helps a lot.
    When life gives you scraps, make a quilt.

  17. #17
    Super Member kiffie2413's Avatar
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    I have a Brother PQ1500, has a 9" throat space, but it only does straight stitch...I just got a Janome Horizon 7700, has 11" throat plate, and does a lot of stitches...I haven't had a chance to use it yet, tho...I also have a Grace machine quilt frame, was going to use my 1500 with it, but never have...I just do a meander stipple or and outline stitch about 1/8" away from ditch on 1500..it has a pin feed system, so I don't have to use a walking (ever feed) foot to do the outline stitch...I will say for the price, it has been a great machine...the pin feed makes piecing quilts a breeze, too...Have you checked out Leah Days website? She does all of her fmq on a domestic machines, couple of years ago got the Janome 7700...but still shows quilting on a regular size domestic machine. Here is a link to her site, she has a TON of great info...
    http://daystyledesigns.com/
    Regards,
    Kif
    PS Quilt gloves, or gloves with fingertip grips are a BIG help...also I use the bobbin genies...and a free motion slider..and I also make sure and have tables around so there is not pull and drag on the quilt...here is another link to youtube videos, have great way to make an inexpensive quilting table:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g14govA4pIM
    Last edited by kiffie2413; 02-12-2013 at 04:27 PM. Reason: add links..
    Always do right. This will gratify some people and astonish the rest~Mark Twain

  18. #18
    Super Member JulieR's Avatar
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    I've quilted up through queen size with my regular ol' Singer. I love that thing.

    So yes, it can definitely be done! But like luvTooQuilt, you might not like to do it that way. Before you invest a lot of money in any machine see if you can take it for a test drive -- for a while. Like, a 'borrow one from a friend for a couple of weeks and a few quilts' type of thing.

    Find out what makes you happy, and then do that!

  19. #19
    Senior Member nvb50's Avatar
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    I use my Husqvarna Ruby embroidery machine to do the the sewing and quilting.

  20. #20
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
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    I quilted large quilts on my DSM before I got my longarm. I used the methods in Marti Michell's book, Machine Quilting in Sections, for all but one of them. That one was huge and couldn't be divided up into sections, so I basted it with water soluble thread on a John Flynn frame and then quilted the whole thing in my Bernina 440QE. (That was enough to persuade me to get a longarm, LOL)

  21. #21
    Super Member mom-6's Avatar
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    I have done several throws (approx. 45 x 60) on my Featherweight. Am about to tackle a twin size in the next few weeks. Anything larger that I've done has been hand quilted. Now I have made an extra long adult sized hooded cape out of thermal backed drapery fabric and lined with velvet on it as well. So you can scrunch up a lot more than you would think you could into such a small space.

  22. #22
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    I quilt on a regular machine. I have done up to queen size but know I could do a king with patience, not even using any fancy methods, just a regular sandwich. Quilt as you go does make really intricate work easier though. I have played on a long arm but have no interest. Just another thing to learn.

  23. #23
    Junior Member mimmy96's Avatar
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    Believe it or not.. There is a lady around here that will quilt any size quilt for $20 each... Yes I know, it's unbelievable ..and she does beautiful work! .. The only thing is about an hour and 1/2 from here. And it also takes her about 2 months to get them back to you... But the price and work is wonderful! Buying really do want to do my own work if I can!

  24. #24
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    I have been quilting on my DSM. I am able to rent a Gammill, but money has been tight--rather buy fabric. It costs about the same to send a small quilt to a local lady who does a fabulous job, so sometimes I send them out.
    Sue

  25. #25
    Member KansasGirl's Avatar
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    I quilt on my Husqvarna Viking Sapphire 835, it has the longer throat on it. So far, I have been able to fit some queen sized quilts on it without too much trouble and work! One of these days though, I am going to get a long-arm. Have had the chance to try them out and love, love it! But that is a long way down the road for me. That's amazing that lady will quilt for $20 a quilt! I can't imagine how she covers her own costs for batting and thread and not to mention her time. Leah Day has some great videos on You Tube to help you get started on quilting on your sewing machine. I've learned a lot from that.

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