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Thread: How would you do this?

  1. #1
    Senior Member bigredharley's Avatar
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    How would you do this?

    Got my quilt back from the LA and she "missed" 2 legs of one pinwheel. (She felt AWFUL) Too expensive to send back and forth again, and she has agreed to send me a bobin of the matching thread. BUT, I'm not a FMQuilter, and need to somehow copy what she did with the other blocks and make it match. I've been reading about the saran wrap, which doesn't seem to work - looking for other suggestions.

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    ​Nancy

  2. #2
    Super Member newbee3's Avatar
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    use tracing paper trace the design on paper or use a stencil then either trace it on the quilt or sew thru the tracing paper

  3. #3
    Super Member JulieR's Avatar
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    Is there someone closer that she can recommend to do the fix?

  4. #4
    Super Member Buckeye Rose's Avatar
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    Maybe you could check locally to see if there is a LA who would be willing to load it and do just those two areas. Or check a local guild for a LA. And I would definitely have the original LA (the one who made the ooops) pay for the fix.

  5. #5
    Super Member Dolphyngyrl's Avatar
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    can you do it by hand, it is such a small area would probably not be noticed
    Brother XL-3500i, SQ-9050, Dreamweaver XE6200D, Juki MO-2000QVP

  6. #6
    Senior Member hevemi's Avatar
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    This may sound harsh but no way I would pay someone and end up finishing the work myself. In my opinion a spool of thread does not compensate for her mistake: she should finish the work at HER expense incl. postage fees ,or give you a considerable discount (as to assume you'll have to have s-o else do her work for her; it's none of her business whether you do or not). You're paying for finished quilting, not partly done.

  7. #7
    Power Poster Mousie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hevemi View Post
    This may sound harsh but no way I would pay someone and end up finishing the work myself. In my opinion a spool of thread does not compensate for her mistake: she should finish the work at HER expense incl. postage fees ,or give you a considerable discount (as to assume you'll have to have s-o else do her work for her; it's none of her business whether you do or not). You're paying for finished quilting, not partly done.
    I am basically a non-confrontational person until it comes to the big stuff.
    I totally agree with hevemi, this is the only professional/business-like way this LA-er should handle it.
    Her mistake - her responsibility.
    Of course she didn't mean to do it, but this is business and not friendship etc.
    I know if I were a business person, that is what I would do.
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  8. #8
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    Just trace the feathers onto tissue or golden thread paper and pin to the pinwheels on the quilt. You can sew right through the tissue paper and carefully rip it off after stitching. You might want to put a few straight pins along the blue so the fabric doesn't move as you stitch as there seems to be a little extra fabric in the unquilted half?

  9. #9
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    I agree the LA should pay the shipping expense. It was her mistake. The first thing I would have said was how do you want to pay for the shipping to and from?
    Got fabric?

  10. #10
    Super Member grammy Dwynn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hevemi View Post
    This may sound harsh but no way I would pay someone and end up finishing the work myself. In my opinion a spool of thread does not compensate for her mistake: she should finish the work at HER expense incl. postage fees ,or give you a considerable discount (as to assume you'll have to have s-o else do her work for her; it's none of her business whether you do or not). You're paying for finished quilting, not partly done.
    Totally agree!!!
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  11. #11
    Super Member Pam S's Avatar
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    I agree with everyone else, she should have checked the quilt before she shipped it back to you. It was her mistake and now she should pay the cost of shipping it back to be finished. If she's a true professional who cares about her customers and wants their repeat business, this is what she would do.

  12. #12
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    Thought: Ask her to consider using the cost of shipping it back toward your next project rather than being totally out this cost.

  13. #13
    Senior Member bigredharley's Avatar
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    We all make mistakes, and this is the same pinwheeel quilt where I made one backwards pinwheel, so I don't want to drag it out any longer. She did offer to fix it. And she gave me a good deal on the LA work for as much as she did.

    Just looking for the best way for me to fix it and be done with it. Ah for the days of good old fashioned carbon paper....I'm thinking I could try to Xerox a square then pin it on and stitch through the paper......thoughts?
    ​Nancy

  14. #14
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    Just listen to Tartan. She has the best idea yet. You can do this.

  15. #15
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    Your idea sounds like it might work. Carbon paper would stain the fabric and not come out. Try to get your stitches about the same length as hers. I quilt my own quilts and always check the back for missed areas.
    Another Phyllis
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  16. #16
    Super Member Janice McC's Avatar
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    Ditto...it's the LA's responsibility to finish the job, including covering the shipping.
    Quote Originally Posted by hevemi View Post
    This may sound harsh but no way I would pay someone and end up finishing the work myself. In my opinion a spool of thread does not compensate for her mistake: she should finish the work at HER expense incl. postage fees ,or give you a considerable discount (as to assume you'll have to have s-o else do her work for her; it's none of her business whether you do or not). You're paying for finished quilting, not partly done.

  17. #17
    Super Member quilt addict's Avatar
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    I would trace the pattern onto paper and then make some copies, more than just the two you need for the quilt. Then practice it on some quilt sandwiches on your domestic sewing machine. This way you can adjust to get the stitch length the same and practice the movement needed to get the smooth curves. of the pattern. When you feel confident with your practice ones, do it on the quilt.
    Lisa

  18. #18
    Senior Member bigredharley's Avatar
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    Good suggestion to make several copies and run some practice ones.

    Quote Originally Posted by quilt addict View Post
    I would trace the pattern onto paper and then make some copies, more than just the two you need for the quilt. Then practice it on some quilt sandwiches on your domestic sewing machine. This way you can adjust to get the stitch length the same and practice the movement needed to get the smooth curves. of the pattern. When you feel confident with your practice ones, do it on the quilt.
    ​Nancy

  19. #19
    Power Poster alikat110's Avatar
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    Whatever you do, I wish you luck. That pin wheel quilt is fabulous.

  20. #20
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    You can actually do that by hand and make the stitching look like machine stitching, without any spaces in between. I've done it. They aren't big areas, so that's what I'd do. When it's finished, you won't be able to find any differences between what was done by hand and what was done by machine, if you are careful. Start off with half of the length of thread on one side of the quilt and half on the other side with the needle on it (no knots on either end). Make the first stitch the correct length (to match those already machine stitched), and you end up with both lengths of thread on one side of the quilt. Now switch the needle to the other length of thread and pass it through to the other side of the quilt through the same hole the first thread is hanging by. Continue in this manner, following the mark you made for the quilting, keeping the stitches very uniform in length. The stitches don't interlock between the layers like machine stitches do, but they pass each other figure eight style between the layers. Hope this makes sense.

  21. #21
    Senior Member Sandi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tartan View Post
    Just trace the feathers onto tissue or golden thread paper and pin to the pinwheels on the quilt. You can sew right through the tissue paper and carefully rip it off after stitching. You might want to put a few straight pins along the blue so the fabric doesn't move as you stitch as there seems to be a little extra fabric in the unquilted half?
    I agree with this solution especially if you don't want to send it back and forth. Check with a local LA first and have the LA quilter suggest what to do. She just might offer to do it for free in the hopes she will get your business later
    Creativity is the essence of the soul
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  22. #22
    Super Member applique's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigredharley View Post
    Got my quilt back from the LA and she "missed" 2 legs of one pinwheel. (She felt AWFUL) Too expensive to send back and forth again, and she has agreed to send me a bobin of the matching thread. BUT, I'm not a FMQuilter, and need to somehow copy what she did with the other blocks and make it match. I've been reading about the saran wrap, which doesn't seem to work - looking for other suggestions.

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    I would use a sheet of water soluble stiffener used in embroidery. Trace the design from a finished area, pin in place and stitch. When done trim away the excess and soak to get rid of the remaining stuff.
    Debbie
    Machine It

  23. #23
    Super Member citruscountyquilter's Avatar
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    I agree that the LA should pay to have it shipped and returned to you after she corrects her error. I like using parchment paper like you use in baking to trace designs and sew over for FMQ. It is less fragile than tissue paper, rips away easily and is economical to use. I just pin it in a few places and work in sections.

  24. #24
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    I agree! She should finish the quilt at her expense.

  25. #25
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    A number of years ago I had a window fabrication home based business. I made a mistake on one panel of a drapery project. Unless you looked closely it was not particularly obvious-I did not see it until the customer pointed it out-maybe it had been a 2 AM finish. I insisted that I fix it when she was willing to let it go. It took me three or four hours to fix. She was impressed that I would go the extra mile that she recommended me to her friends and I reaped lots of benefits from the experience. Besides, I could be proud of my work. Would you recommend this LA to others? If she went the extra mile and rectified the error at her expense would you recommend her to others? We all make errors, but in commercial endeavors we should be responsible for them.

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