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Thread: HP Bubble Jet Set 2000

  1. #1
    Senior Member Extreme Quilter's Avatar
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    This is a new product for use on newer models of HP inkjets that use Viera inks. Has anyone tried it and does it promote the vibrancy in colors that it promises to do? Thanks.

  2. #2
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
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    Bubble Jet Set (BJS) 2000 has been around for a few years now. It is a great product. Worth every penny (lowest price is usually at Dahrma Trading Co online)

    I "upgraded" to an HP printer using a Vivera tri-color cartridge #97. I got the worst results i have ever gotten with BJS. The older printers that used 78s and 23s were so much better.

    the HP cartridges in the 10/11 series have a bad reputation (only in regard to whether they work with BJS. i'm not bad-mouthing HP or their printers. work horses; great for lots of things. i just don't use an HP to print my fabric any more. i bought a Canon that uses ChromaLife 100 ink to use instead.)

    if you already have the printer, i'm not suggesting you run out to plunk down hundreds for a new one. i just said all so you would understand that if you don't get results that thrill you to pieces, it isn't the BJS. it's the ink.

    one more hint - use 200 ct, 100% cotton muslin. white is best. you'll greatly increase your chances of success.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Extreme Quilter's Avatar
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    Patrice, I had the same disappointing results before as you did with my HP printer.

    But this new HP Bubble Jet Set 2000 is a new product designed to correct the problem and made specifically for the new Viera inks in HP. I was hoping someone would report fabulous results becaue I do have an HP printer.

    Thanks for your input.

  4. #4
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
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    ooops! i didn't notice the "HP" in front of the BJS. i'm sooooooo sorry. i had no idea they'd developed a version of BJS especially for HP ink.

    shot off my big mouth without the right ammo. that'll teach me.
    :oops:

    i'd say try it. you'd gamble less money in a 5 minute trip through a casino. i doubt the BJS folks would say it works well if it doesn't. i think it was somewhere on (or through) their site that i read about the problems and the specific inks that were causing them.

  5. #5
    community benefactor Knot Sew's Avatar
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    I have a lexmark will that work for fabric?

  6. #6
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
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    almost any inkjet will work. the results vary by printer, ink technology, and the fabric you use. the Bubble Jet Set remains the critical step. You can buy it by the bottle, or you can buy pretreated fabric in sheets or rolls. there are lots of different brands of pretreated fabric. i have never used any of them, so won't say which are good and which aren't. But, since i trust the BJS 2000 from the bottle, i would probably stick to the CJ Jenkins brand of anything related to printing on fabric.

    this article has some information about what to look for in your printer's features

    http://www.cjenkinscompany.com/category_s/21.htm

  7. #7
    Senior Member Extreme Quilter's Avatar
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    Patrice, thanks for the Jenkins site. I'll have to try some of those Miracle Fabric sheets they talk about. I'm not so sure about the claim that they are the only sheets that can be heat set. Wouldn't you think the other sheets could be too? I guess the only way to tell how good their new product, HP BJS, will work on the HP Vivera ink cartridges (mine are #02) is to try it.

  8. #8
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
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    there are not other heat-setable products using inkjet technology on fabric that i know of. it's fairly new from CJJ, too. not even out there for a whole year (i think). i wish they'd sell the heat-setable stuff by the bottle, too, but they don't.

    i don't doubt the fabric sheets are every bit as good as they say. but they are around $1.5 per sheet (counting shipping). yeeps!!!
    treating with bottled BJS costs approximately 35 cents per sheet if you only get the 50 sheets per bottle CJJ estimates and pay roughly $5 per yard for your muslin.

    if i depended on an HP to print my fabric, i'd buy 1 bottle and the smallest pack they sell of the pretreated stuff, then compare. that's the only way to tell whether the expense of pretreated is a value.

    there are 2 things i'm not clear on about the pre-packaged stuff:
    - is the heat-setable also washable? (i emailed, but got an answer that skipped that question.)
    - is the prepackaged/pretreated stuff good for HP inks? (if they had to develop a special do-it-yourself chemical, doesn't it follow they'd need a separate line of the factory treated items?)

    i will admit it. i hope you volunteer to be our laboratory technician. get some. Pleeeeeeeeeeeeeze? i'm really curious to see whether or not i can use both printers. i could crank things out twice as fast. :-)

  9. #9
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    Patrice, the packaged, pretreated fabric sheets are washable only if the instructions say so. Some sheets are dry clean only (ugh). Depends on the company.

    Here's what works best for me. Jacquaard cotton fabric sheets (ten per package at Michael's for $15.99, which I buy at 40% off with my coupon). I increase my saturation, brightness and ink output settings before printing. I air dry as well as heat set with a hot iron not once but several times over and over and over. Then I rinse in synthropol and when the fabric is dry, ironed and ready to be sewn, I spray with Wet Guard to make it water repellant.

    The colors of the other brands of fabric sheets do not come out as vibrant on my HP.

    I think I will try the new HP BJS. It will be less convenient than the sheets but a lot more economical.

  10. #10
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
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    i'm sorry, but i'm giggling as i read your post.

    trust me. the from-the-bottle BJS method is less complicated than what you just described. LOL

    you don't have to, but i prewash my 200-ct muslin in hot water and synthrapol. (man! is that the worst smelling stuff, or what? but you need a little bitty capful in a max washerload. i'm still working off the same gallon i bought about 5 years ago.) the pre-wash is primarily to pre-shrink. the muslin i got from Joanns didn't shrink at all as far as i can tell, but i'll keep doing it anyway, just in case.

    1. prewash
    2. cut to size
    3. pour the BJS into your soak basin. i can't be bothered measuring. i dump whatever i have into the basin.
    4. put the fabric sheets in one at a time until you've either got them all or until the BJS doesn't saturate the top sheet even if you press them all down.
    5. let 'em soak. (go flirt with your husband for a while. hee hee hee)
    6. take them out.
    7. hang them up
    8. iron the dry sheets to freezer paper, or stick them to sheets of sticker paper. (some people swear by the full page labels, but i can't get the fabric off those without permanent distortion of the print. the sticker paper is re-positionable.)
    8. print, then let sit for at least 30 minutes
    9. rinse with the mildest detergent on hand. bubble jet rinse is too expensive. syntrapol, original woolite, and things like that will do just as well.

    wash, cut, slap onto paper, soak, print, rinse, done. tooo easy. (and make sure hubby uses the $1.25 or more you save per sheet to buy you a really nice surprise. ;-) )

    i'm absolutely not criticizing the pretreated, iron setable sheets as a product, and wouldn't try to talk anybody else out of using them. they just aren't for me. you can't just chuck them into your dryer on its highest setting (i checked with CJJ). no way i'm slaving over that iron any more often than i have to. LOL

  11. #11
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    Patrice, lol. I read your instructions and thought the packaged stuff was way simpler! What a pair we make.

    I took a BJS class way back in the dark ages and never got on board with that stuff, but I'm now going to take another look, thanks to you.

    Any opinions on how your BJS projects hold up to repeated washings? Any fading problems?

  12. #12
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
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    well the best quilts always use more than one block, don't they? :wink:

    long-term washability depends on a variety of factors. the most important of these are the fabric and the ink. (yeah. big surprise. LOL)

    for the most part, anything that doesn't fade by the second laundering is there to stay - just like any other fabric you buy. keep in mind, also, that i deliberately put my prints through the most abusive laundering i can come up with before i decide to use them in a quilt.

    i don't make quilts for display. i make them to use. mostly kids' and baby quilts so far. i sometimes make lap size versions of more adult-type quilts. (either as prototypes or because i got bored with it before it got any bigger. LOL)

    some day, i hope to incorporate my own fabrics into things i can sell. i need to know in advance how much they can stand so i can be honest with the customers.

    i can't wait to find out if the new HP formula can match the quality i get from my Canon. no kidding. i'd have them both spitting the stuff out at the same time.

    uh-oh. this is not good. i'm getting that feeling in my tummy and itch in the digits that usually means i'm headed online to get some without waiting to hear from somebody else. RATS!!!!

  13. #13
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    Ruth, I would think a Lexmark would work for fabric printing as long as the fabric is either pretreated with Bubble Jet Set by you or purchased in packs of five or ten sheets per package by various manufacturers (sold at Michael's, JoAnn's, WalMart, etc.). Results will vary from printer to printer so you will need to experiment.

  14. #14
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    Thanks, Patrice. I really must look into a Canon printer when my budget allows.

    Would you recommend using BJS on cotton sateen, which is 200 count all cotton but with a subtle sheen? Comes in all colors.

  15. #15
    Moderator kathy's Avatar
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    what is it that gives the sheen? you gotta make sure there is nothing that is going to keep the ink from penetrating into the fabric

  16. #16
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
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    couldn't say. i've never tried it. not sure i'd see the point though, unless you plan to leave wide expanses of the fabric unprinted. the ink will "unsheen" wherever it goes. it's been a while since i tried printing on color fabric. the results were not impressive. however, you have put a bug in my brain that might cause an itch to try again.

  17. #17
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    Kathy, that is something to consider. It only came to mind because I remember seeing a beautiful art quilt in a magazine where the quilter said she used BJS on white cotton sateen. This particular fabric is not as shiny as chintz. I've seen it at JoAnn's selling for about $8 or $9 a yard.

  18. #18
    Super Member Quilter7x's Avatar
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    This thread is almost four years old, but I recently took a class in printing on fabric. The teacher brought her stuff for us to use. We were all able to print and treat one fabric sheet in class.

    I came home with five sheets of pretreated fabric ready to print on, but don't have the Bubble Jet Rinse she used in class. Has anyone used other products or created their own rinse? Sounds like it's a very important step or the images will fade.

  19. #19
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
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    the first rinse after printing is very important.

    however, you don't have to use Bubble Jet Rinse.

    any super-mild laundry detergent will do. Woolite is often recommended as an alternative.

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